William Butler Yeats: Works (2) - Contents

LifeWorksCriticismCommentaryQuotationsReferencesNotes

Bibliographical details

File 1
Contemp. Editions (Poetry, Plays & Fiction)
Poetry collections [Dublin first edns.]
Poetry collections [London 1st edns.]
Plays [1st editions]
Plays [early collected edns.]
Edited anthologies & collections Fiction [short stories & novels]
Criticism [books & prefaces]
Criticism [selected articles]
A Vision (1925, 1937, &c.)
Autobiographical Writings
Journals & Broadsides
Modern Editions
Collected Poems & Collected Plays
Collected & standard editions
Collected Works - Macmillan Edition
Collected Works - The Cornell Yeats
Variorum editions of the works
Correspondence [letters]
Miscellaneous compilations

File 2
Contents of the editions (original and modern)

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Bibliographical details
Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry (London: Walter Scott 1888). [See editions, infra.] CONTENTS: Introduction. The Trooping Fairies: “The Fairies”, by William Allingham; “Frank Martin and the Fairies”, by William Carleton; “The Priest’s Supper”, by T. Crofton Croker; “The Fairy Well Of Lagnanay”, by Samuel Ferguson; “Teig O’Kane (Tadhg O Cáthán) and the Corpse”, trans. by Douglas Hyde; “Paddy Corcoran’s Wife”, by William Carleton; “Cusheen Loo”, trans. by J. J. Callanan; “The White Trout: A Legend of Cong”, by S[amuel] Lover; “The Fairy Thorn: An Ulster Ballad”, by Sir Samuel Ferguson; “The Legend of Knockgrafton”, by T. Crofton Croker; “A Donegal Fairy”, by Letitia Maclintock. Changelings: The Brewery of Egg-Shells”, by T. Crofton Croker; “The Fairy Nurse”, by Edward Walsh; “Jamie Freel and the Young Lady, A Donegal Tale”, by Letitia Maclintock; “The Stolen Child”, by W. B. Yeats. The Merrow: “The Soul Cages”, by T. Crofton Croker; ““Flory Cantillon’s Funeral”, by T. Crofton Croker. The Solitary Fairies [Lepracaun; Cluricaun; Far Darrig]: “The Lepracaun, or Fairy Shoemaker”, by William Allingham; “Master and Man”, by T. Crofton Croker; “Far Darrig in Donegal”, by Letitia Maclintock. The Pooka: The Piper and the Puca”, by Douglas Hyde; “Daniel O’Rourke”, by T. Crofton Croker; “The Kildare Pooka”, by Patrick Kennedy; “The Banshee: How Thomas Connolly Met the Banshee”, by J. Todhunter; “A Lamentation for the Death of Sir Maurice Fitzgerald”, trans by Clarence Mangan; “The Banshee of the Mac Carthys”, by T. Crofton Croker. Ghosts: “A Dream”, by William Allingham; “Grace Connor”, by Letitia Maclintock; “A Legend of Tyrone”, by Ellen O’Leary; “The Black Lamb”, by Lady Wilde; “Song of the Ghost”, by Alfred Percival Graves; “The Radiant Boy”, by Mrs. Crow; “The Fate Of Frank M’Kenna”, by William Carleton. “Witches, Fairy Doctors: Bewitched Butter (Donegal)”, by Letitia Maclintock; “A Queen’s County Witch [Dublin University Magazine, 1839]; “The Witch Hare”, by Mr. and Mrs. S. C. Hall; “Bewitched Butter (Queen’s County)” [Dublin University Magazine, 1839 ]; “The Horned Women”, by Lady Wilde; “The Witches’ “Excursion”, by Patrick Kennedy; “The Confessions of Tom Bourke”, by T. Crofton Croker; “The Pudding Bewitched”, by William Carleton. Tír-na-n-Og: “The Legend of O’Donoghue”, by T. Crofton Croker; “Rent-day” [n.a.] ; “Loughleagh (Lake Of Healing)” [Dublin and London Magazine, 1825]; “Hy-Brasail - The Isle of the Blest”, by Gerald Griffin; “The Phantom Isle”, by Giraldus Cambrensis. Saints, Priests: The Priest’s Soul”, by Lady Wilde; “The Priest of Coloony”, by W. B. Yeats; “The Story of the Little Bird”, by T. Crofton Croker; “Conversion of King Laoghair’s Daughters; “King O’Toole and His Goose”, by S[amuel] Lover. The Devil: The Demon Cat”, by Lady Wilde; “The Long Spoon”, by Patrick Kennedy; “The Countess Kathleen O’Shea [[n.a.; London Irish newspaper]; “The Three Wishes”, by W. Carleton. Giants: “The Giant’s Stairs”, by T. Crofton Croker; “A Legend of Knockmany”, by William Carleton. Kings, Queens, Princesses, Earls, Robbers: “The Twelve Wild Geese”, by Patrick Kennedy; “The Lazy Beauty and Her Aunts”, by Patrick Kennedy; “The Haughty Princess”, by Patrick Kennedy; “The Enchantment of Gearoidh Iarla”, by Patrick Kennedy; “Munachar and Manachar”, trans. by Douglas Hyde; “Donald and his Neighbours” [Hibernian Tales]; “The Jackdaw: The Story of Conn-eda, or the Golden Apples of Lough Erne”, by Abraham M’Coy, trans. by Nicholas O’Kearney. Notes: Gods of the Earth; Sir Samuel Ferguson; Cusheen Loo; Legend of Knockgrafton [with music]; Stolen Child; Solitary Fairies; Banshee’s Cry [mus. notation by Mr. & Mrs. Hall]; Omens; A Witch Trial; T’yeer-na-n-Oge; The Ganconer or Gancanagh; Father John O’Hart; Shoneen and Sleiveen; Demon Cat; A Legend of Knockmany; Some Authorities on Irish Folk-Lore.

[See copy of 1888 Edn. in RICORSO Library, “Irish Classics > W. B. Yeats”, via index or direct.]

Editions - Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry (London: Walter Scott; NY: Thom. Whitaker; Toronto: W. J. Gage 1888), xviii, 326pp.; Do. [rep.] (London: Walter Scott [1893], xviii, 326pp.; Do. [Scott’s Library, 37] (London: Walter Scott [1906]), vxii, 326pp.; Do., as Irish Fairy Tales (London: T. Fisher Unwin 1892); Do., as Irish Fairy and Folk Tales (NY: A. L. Burt [1899]); Do., as Irish Folk Stories and Fairy Tales, ed. William Butler Yeats [Grosset’s Universal Library] (NY: Grosset & Dunlap [1957]), 297pp. [21 cm.]; Do., as Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry, with a foreword by Kathleen Raine [2nd Edn.] (Gerrards Cross: Colin Smythe 1973), xix, 389pp.; Do. [US edn. of Colin Smythe edn.] (NY: The Macmillan Press 1973), xx, 389pp.; Do. with a foreword by Kathleen Raine, and a list of sources by Mary Helen Thuente [3rd Edn.] (Gerrards Cross: Colin Smythe 1988), xxvi, 441pp. [incorp. Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry, 1888; Irish Fairy Tales, 1892; also 5 stories from Irish Fairy and Folk Tales, 1899 - t.p.verso; Bibl., [xvii-xxi]; Do. [4th Edn.] (Gerrards Cross: Colin Smythe 1992), and Do. [5th Edn.] (Gerrards Cross: Colin Smythe 1995).

See NY Edn. 1881
Fairy and Folk Tales of the / Irish Peasantry. Edited and / Selected by W. B. Yeats // The Walter Scott Publishing Co., Ltd. / London and Felling-on-Tyne. / New York: 3 East 14th Street [n.d.] T.p. verso blank [iv]. Inscribed / to my mystical friend / G. R. [v]; Contents [vii-viii.] (Digital version of copy in NYPL available at Google Books - online; accessed 10.01.2012.

Rep. editions ill. [mus.; incls. Butler’s Fairy and folk tales of the Irish peasantry (NY 1888) and Irish fairy tales (London 1892); Do. [3rd & 4th edns.], with a foreword by Kathleen Raine (1992, 1995), xxvi, 448pp. [incl. T. C. Croker, William Carleton, Patrick Kennedy, Nicholas O’Kearney, Lady Wilde, et al., as well as trans. from Irish collected by Hyde, poems by Mangan, Allingham. Ferguson, et al.; see contents];

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Representative Irish Tales [1891], ed. W. B. Yeats [facs. rep. of 1st edn., as infra] with Foreword by Mary Helen Thuente (Gerrards Cross: Colin Smythe 1979; rep. 1991), 364pp. CONTENTS: Vol. I - Maria Edgeworth, Castle Rackent [entire excepting Glossary]. John & Michael Banim, “The Stolen Sheep” (from A Bit O’ Writing, 1838); Banims, “The Mayor of Wind-Gap” (sep. scenes from The Mayor of Wind-Gap, 1834). William Carleton, “Wildgoose Lodge” (from Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry, 1830-33, prev. rep. in Stories from Carleton; note deletion of add. paras. of information on background); Carleton, “Condy Cullan and the Gauger” (prev. as “Condy Cullen or the Exciseman Defeated”, in Barney Brady’s Goose; The Hedge School, the Three Tasks, and other Irish Tales [n.d., n.p.; personal copy of W. B. Yeats], also publ. as “Condy Cullen, or the Irish Rake”, in Tales and Sketches, 1845); Carleton, “The Curse” (excerpt from “Party Fight and Funeral”, in Traits and Stories ); Carleton, “The Battle of the Factions” (from Traits and Stories). Vol. II - Samuel Lover, “Barny O’Reirdon, the Navigator” (from Legends and Stories of Ireland, 1st ser. 1831); Lover, “Paddy the Piper” (from Legends and Stories of Ireland, 1st ser. 1831; admitted in a note by Lover to be by a friend). William Maginn, “Father Tom and the Pope” (printed anon. in Blackwood’s, 43, May 1838, pp.614-17; actually by Samuel Ferguson as made known in Mary Ferguson’s Sir Samuel Ferguson and the Ireland of his Day, 1895; episode of the kissing of Pope’s housekeeper here omitted - see further under Maginn, supra). T. C. Croker, “The Confessions of Tom Bourke” (from Fairy Legends and Folk Tales ... [ &c .], Vol. I, 1825; prev. rep. in Fairy and Folk Tales, 1888). Gerald Griffin, “The Knight of the Sheep” (from Tales of My Neighbourhood, 1835); “The Death of the Huntsman” (excerpt from The Collegians, 1825); Charles Lever, “Trinity College” (excerpt from Charles O’Malley, 1841). Charles Kickham, “The Pig-Driving Peelers” (excerpt from For the Old Land, 1886). Rosa Mulholland, “The Hungry Death” (unpub. and sent to Yeats by Father Russell). Anon., “The Jackdaw” (orig. in The Royal Hibernian Tales, C. M. Warren c.1829; prev. rep. in Fairy and Folk Tales, 1888); “Darby Doyle’s Visit to Quebec” (Dublin Penny Journal, 1 No. 24, 8 Dec. 1832.) [Notes from Thuente, ‘A List of Sources’, in Gerrards Cross rep. edn., 1979, pp.21-23.

1st edition: Representative Irish Tales, compiled, with an introduction and notes by W. B. Yeats [Knickerbocker Nuggets], 2 vols. (NY: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, [1891]), v., 339pp.; 15 cm. [bound in light blue, blue and gold patterned cloth over boards; deep blue cloth shelfback; stamped in gold on covers and spine; top edge gilt and trimmed; catalogued as Wade 215.] Note: contains stories and excerpts by [Carleton and nine other Irish authors, incl. Maria Edgworth whose Castle Rackrent is given in its entirety.

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The Celtic Twilight. Men and women, dhouls and faeries, &c. (London: Lawrence & Bullen 1893), xii, 212pp., ill. [1 pl.; 16.4cm.; printed in London by Richard Clay Sons]; Do. as The Celtic Twilight [rev. & enl. edition] (London: A. H. Bullen 1902), [2], x, 234 [2]pp., ill. [1 pl., port. by John Butler Yeats, 1896; 19.3cm. ‘Reprinted with additions 1902’, p.iv.] See details of the 1893 Edition - infra; also those of the 1902 Edition - infra.

Digital editions on Internet

Internet Archive

The Celtic Twilight / Men and Women, Dhouls and Faeries. / by / W. B. Yeats / with a frontispiece by J. B. Yeats [1st edn.] (London: Lawrence and Bullen 1893), xii, 212pp., front. [pl.; 16.4cm.; printed by Richard Clay & Sons. “Time Drops in decay”; CONTENTS [pp.ix-x]; “This Book”; “A Teller of Tales”; “Belief and Unbelief”; “A Visionary”; “Village Ghosts”; “A Knight of the Sheep”; “The Sorcerers”; “The Last Gleeman”; “Regina, Regina Pigmeorum, Veni”; “Kidnappers”; “The Untiring Ones”; “The Man and His Boots”; “A Coward”; “The Three O’Byrnes and the Evil Faeries”; “Drumcliff and Rosses”; “The Thick Skull of the Fortunate”; “The Religion of the Sailor”; “Concerning the Nearness Together of Heaven, Earth, and Purgatory”; “The Eaters of Precious Stones”; “Our Lady of the Hills”; “The Golden Age”; “A Remonstrance with Scotsmen for Having Soured the Disposition of Their Ghosts and Faeries”; “The Four Winds of Desire”; “Into the Twilight”. [For further details, incl. variations between the preface (i.e., “This Book”) in the First and Second Editions, see Editorial Notes attched to The Celtic Twilight (1902 Edn.) in RICORSO Library, > “Irish Classics” > Yeats > - via index or direct.]

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The Celtic Twilight / by W. B. Yeats [rev. & enl.] (London: A. H. Bullen, Cecil Court, St. Martin’s Lane, London W.C. / MMCII [1902]), [2], x, 234 [2]pp., 1 pl. [frontis. port. of W. B. Yeats, by John B. Yeats, dated 1896; 19.3cm.]; t.p. [p.v]; ‘reprint of 1893 Edition with additions’ [p.iv]. CONTENTS [pp.ix-x]: “Time drops in decay …” [untitled poem; vi]; “The Host” [i.e., “The Hosting of the Sidhe” [poem, vii]. “This Book” [1]; “A Teller of Tales” [4; part publ. in Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry, 1888, Introduction]; “Belief and Unbelief” [8; previously in part in FFTIP; final para. deleted in 1902 Edn.]; “Mortal Help” [12; first publ. in “New Chapters of the Celtic Twilight”, in the Speaker, 19 April 1902 - being 5th of 6 stories in 4th of 5 essays]; “A Visionary” [15; first publ. as “An Irish Visionary” in National Observer, ed. W. E. Henley, 3 Oct. 1891]; “Village Ghosts” [23]; “‘Dust hath closed Helen’s Eye’” [35; first publ. in The Dome, Oct. 1899; title from “In Time of Pestilence”, a poem of Thomas Nashe; the para. ‘When I was in a nothern town ...’ added in 1902]; “A Knight of the Sheep” [50; prev. as “An Impression”, in Speaker, 21 Oct. 1893; title from Griffin’s, “The Knight of the Sheep” in Tales of My Neighbourhood, 1835; signifies a strong farmer - cf. Gl. ridire caorach]; “An Enduring Heart” [56; first publ. in “New Chapters of the Celtic Twilight”, in the Speaker, 19 April 1902 - being 2nd of 2stories in 5th of 5 essays, and an add. story on the knight of the sheep]; “The Sorcerers” [61; additional sentence in 1902 edition]; “The Devil” [69; first publ. in “New Chapters of the Celtic Twilight”, in the Speaker, 19 April 1902 - being 3rd of 6 stories in 4th of 5 essays]; “Happy and Unhappy Theologians” [71; first publ. in “New Chapters of the Celtic Twilight”, in the Speaker, 15 Feb. 1902 - being 2nd essay of 5]; “The Last Gleeman” [79; National Observer, 6 May 1893]; “Regina, Regina Pigmeorum, Veni” [79; ftn. of 1924 edn. explains that this was an incantation used by [William] Lilly, astrologer, in Windsor Forest; based on personal events described in a letter to Richard Le Gallienne, [15] Oct. 1892 - Coll. Letters, I, p.321; a second note on ‘trance’ added in 1924 but deleted in subsequent editions; also printed in Irish Home Reading Magazine, May 1894]; “‘And Fair, Fierce Women’” [97; first publ. in “New Chapters of the Celtic Twilight”, in the Speaker, 19 April 1902 - being 4th of 6 stories in 4th of 5 essays]; “Enchanted Woods” [101; first publ. in “New Chapters of the Celtic Twilight”, in the Speaker, 18 Jan. 1902 - being 1st essay of 5]; “Miraculous Creatures” [109; first publ. in “New Chapters of the Celtic Twilight”, in the Speaker, 26 April 1902 - being 1st of 2 stories in 5th of 5 essays]; “Aristotle of the Books” [112; first publ. in “New Chapters of the Celtic Twilight”, in the Speaker, 19 April 1902 - being 6th of 6 stories in 4th of 5 essays]; “The Swine of the Gods” [113; first publ. in “New Chapters of the Celtic Twilight”, in the Speaker, 19 April 1902 - being 2nd of 6 stories in 4th of 5 essays]; “A Voice” [115; first publ. in “New Chapters of the Celtic Twilight”, in the Speaker, 19 April 1902 - being 1st of 6 stories in 4th of 5 essays]; “Kidnappers” [117]; “The Untiring Ones” [130; prob. by oral sources - indicated by transcription of Cailleach Bérri (or Beare), as noted by Robert Welch (Yeats, Irish Folklore [... &c.] 1993)]; “Earth, Fire and Water” [135; first publ. in “New Chapters of the Celtic Twilight”, in the Speaker, 15 March 1902 - being 3rd of 3 stories in 3rd of 5 essays]; “The Old Town” [137; first publ. in “New Chapters of the Celtic Twilight”, in the Speaker, 15 March 1902 - being 1st of 3 stories in 3rd of 5 essays]; “The Man and His Boots” [141]; “A Coward” [143]; “The Three O’Byrnes and the Evil Faeries” [145; prev. as in “Irish Fairies”, in Leisure Hour, Oct. 1890]; “Drumcliff and Rosses” [148]; “The Thick Skull of the Fortunate” [160; 2nd. sect. commencing ‘I wrote all this years ago ...’, added 1902]; “The Religion of a Sailor” [163]; “Concerning the Nearness Together of Heaven, Earth, and Purgatory” [165]; “The Eaters of Precious Stones” [167]; “Our Lady of the Hills” [169; first pub. in the Speaker, 11 Nov. 1893]; “The Golden Age” [173]; “A Remonstrance with Scotsmen for having soured the Disposition of their Ghosts and Faeries” [176]; “War” [183; first publ. in “New Chapters of the Celtic Twilight”, in the Speaker, 15 March 1902 - being 2nd of 3 stories in 3rd of 5 essays]; “The Queen and the Fool” [186]; “The Friends of the People of Faery” [195]; “Dreams that have no Moral” [208]; “By the Roadside” [231; first publ. in An Claidmeamh Soluis, 13 July 1901]; “Into the Twilight” [poem, 235].

[ See a full-text version of the 1902 Edition, with annotations relating to its variance from the 1893 Edition, in RICORSO Library > “Irish Classics” > W. B. Yeats - via index or direct. ]

[Note: The above listing has been annotated with reference to Robert Welch, ed., Irish Folklore, Legend and Myth (Penguin 1993) - vide Notes [392ff.] square-brackets denote initial page-numbers of the stories, each beginning after on an unnumbered page following a separate a t.p. with a blank verso (also unnumbered). Asterisks denote items first published in 1902 edition - some having previously appearing in journals as indicated in the details given after page numbers.

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The Celtic Twilight, introduced by Kathleen Raine [prev. 1893, 1902; compiled by Raine to her own taste] (Gerrards Cross: Colin Smythe 1981). CONTENTS: Introduction by Kathleen Raine [7]; “Time drops in decay” [untitled poem; 30]; The Host [31]; This Book [32]; A Teller of Tales [34]; Belief and Unbelief [36]; Mortal Help* [38]; A Visionary [40]; Village Ghosts [43]; “Dust hath closed Helen’s Eye”* [49]; A Knight of the Sheep [56]; An Enduring Heart* [59]; The Sorcerers [62]; The Devil* [65]; Happy and Unhappy Theologians* [67]; The Last Gleeman [71]; Regina, Regina Pigmeorum, Veni [77]; “And Fair, Fierce Women” [81]; Enchanted Woods* [83]; Miraculous Creatures* [87]; Aristotle of the Books* [88]; The Swine of the Gods* [89]; A Voice* [90]; Kidnappers [91]; The Untiring Ones [97]; Earth, Fire and Water* [100]; The Old Town* [101]; The Man and His Boots [103]; A Coward [104]; The Three O’Byrnes and the Evil Faeries [105]; Drumcliff and Rosses [107]; The Thick Skull of the Fortunate [115]; The Religion of a Sailor [117]; Concerning the Nearness Together of Heaven, Earth and Purgatory [118]; The Eaters of Precious Stones [119]; Our Lady of the Hills [120]; The Golden Age [122]; A Remonstrance with Scotsmen for having soured the Disposition of their Ghosts and Faeries [124]; War* [127]; The Queen and the Fool* [129]; The Friends of the People of Faery* [135]; Dreams that have no Moral* [141]; By the Roadside* [153]; Appendix: The Four Winds of Desire [155]; Into the Twilight [verse; 160]. Asterisks mark - given in her edition - mark stories added in the 1902 edition.

Illustrations by Jean Townsend: Queen Maeve and Knocknarea [3]; The white cat [44]; The devil [66]; The queen of the little people [78]; The tale of the bride stolen by the faeries [94]; “I sat trembling and turning the corpse until midnight.” [110]; The man in armour in the churchyard [113]; “That love, when limbs are interwoven” [131]; The kisses of Aengus and his messenger 133]; The fish and those who ate it [142]; The princess, Jack, the serpent and the bully [148]. Note: Asterisks denote items first included in 1902 edition (though first published in literary jourrnals, &c.).

See also The Celtic Twilight [being one section] in the Macmillan reprint collection The Secret Rose (1959, as infra) - being a selection from Mythologies (1959, as infra) combining The Celtic Twilight (1893, 1902) with The Secret Rose (1897) and Stories of Red Hanrahan (also 1897). This edition cites The Celtic Twilight (1893) in its subtitle but actually contains all of stories of the 1902 edition along with footnotes from that edition with some others specifically dated 1924 which were first printed in Early Poems and Stories (1925). Neither the prefixed verses nor the preface (“This Book”) of the 1893 or 1902 editions are included in this edition, which also omits “The Four Winds of Desire” [see note].

Note: “The Four Winds of Desire” is erroneously listed as part of the contents of the 1902 edition in Robert Welch, ed., Writings on Irish Folklore, Legend and Myth, by W. B. Yeats (Penguin 1993), Appendix [pp.456-58], p.458. That piece is, however, included in the 1981 re-set edition introduced by Kathleen Raine and issued by Colin Smythe (The Celtic Twilight, Gerrards Cross: 1981, 160pp.). Raine’s edition is based on the 1893 and 1902 editions combined whilst incorporating notes from the editions of 1902 and 1924 (i.e., that one included in Early Poems, 1924). As she explains: ‘The present edition contains the text of the earlier version (1893) but with the additions of the later stories also - those dated 1902 in the second edition.’ (p.7.) This allows for the inclusion of “The Four Winds of Desire”, here given as ‘Appendix’ (p.155.).

“The Four Winds of Desire” is properly excluded from the digital version given at Sacred Texts website, which contains a page-by-page table of contents up to p.235 [see online; accessed 25.10.2010]. Note, however, a discrepancy between the pagination in that edition - which includes 12 [pp.[1]-xii] pages of prefatory material with a body of 235 pages (pp.[1]-235]) - and the pagination listed for the 1902 volume in the catalogues of several major libraries list in COPAC (i.e., x, 234pp.)

Note: The Celtic Twilight is largely reprinted in Mythologies (London: Macmillan & Co. 1959), pp.5-141. Viz., A Teller of Tales [5]; Belief and Unbelief [7]; Mortal Help [9]; A Visionary [11]; Village Ghosts [15]; ‘Dust hath closed Helen’s Eye’ [22]; A Knight of the Sheep [31]; An Enduring Heart [34]; The Sorcerers [37]; The Devil [41]; Happy and Unhappy Theologians [42]; The Last Gleeman [47]; Regina, Regina Pigmeorum, Veni [54]; ‘And Fair, Fierce Women’ [57]; Enchanted Woods [670]; Miraculous Creatures [65]; Aristotle of the Books [66]; The Swine of the Gods [67]; A Voice [68]; Kidnappers [70]; The Untiring Ones [77]; Earth, Fire and Water [80]; The Old Town [81]; The Man and His Boots [83]; A Coward [85]; The Three O’Byrnes and the Evil Faeries [86]; Drumcliff and Rosses [8]; The Thick Skull of the Fortunate [95]; The Religion of a Sailor [97]; Concerning the Nearness Together of Heaven, Earth and Purgatory [98]; The Eaters of Precious Stones [100]; Our Lady of the Hills [101]; The Golden Age [104]; A Remonstrance with Scotsmen for having Soured the Disposition of Their Ghosts and Faeries [106]; War [110]; The Queen and the Fool [112]; The Friends of the People of Faery [117]; Dreams that have no Moral [125]; By the Roadside [138]; Into the Twilight [verse; 141]. (For full contents of Mythologies, 1959, see infra.)

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The Secret Rose (London: Lawrence & Bullen 1897), xii, 265pp., 19cm., ill. [7 lvs. of pls. incl. front. by J. B. Yeats; book design by Althea Gyles, and dedicated to “A.E.” [i.e., George Russell] Printed by Richard Clay & Sons, Limited [of] London and Bungay; t.p. in black and red ink. [Wade A.21.]
Cf. COPAC details & listing of the contents of the 1897 1st Edition:
  • “The Binding of the Hair”
  • “The Wisdom of the King”
  • “Where There is Nothing, There is God”
  • “The Crucifixion of the Outcast”
  • “Out of the Rose”
  • “The Curse of the Fires and of
     the Shadows”
  • “The Heart of the Spring”
  • “Of Costello, the Proud, of Oona the
     daughter of Dermott and of the
     Bitter Tongue”
  • “The Book of the Great Dhoul and
      Hanrahan the Red”
  • “The Twisting of the Rope and Hanrahan
      the Red”
  • “Kathleen the Daughter of Hollihan and
      Hanrahan the Red”
  • “The Curse of Hanrahan the Red”
  • “The Vision of Hanrahan the Red”
  • “The Death of Hanrahan the Red”
  • “The Rose of Shadow”
  • “The Old Men of the Twilight”
  • “Rosa Alchemica”

Copies are held in university libraries at Aberdeen, Durham, Edinburgh, London Library, Manchester, Newcastle, Reading, TCD, Univ. of London, ULRLS, York and Oxford, and the National Trust. [See online.]

Note: “The Tables of the Law” and “The Adoration of the Magi”, also intended for inclusion, were excluded by the publisher and printed privately in 1897 [printed by Bullen without publisher's name but with his sign]; a regular edition appeared in 1905 [published by Elkin Matthews].

Note also: The above stories are reproduced in this order in G. J. Watson, ed. & intro., W. B. Yeats / Short Fiction (Penguin 1995), pp.77-198, together with “Red Hanhrahan” - a later tale which he treats as a vehicle for ideas developed in the contemporary preparation of A Vision [to which are affixed “The Tables of the Law” and “The Adoration of the Magi”]. For full contents of the Short Fiction (1995), see infra.

Further printings ...
  • The Secret Rose [another edition] (London: Elkins Mathews 1904), incls. “The Tables of the Law” and “Adoration of the Magi”;
  • The Secret Rose (Dublin: Maunsel 1905), xi, 265pp., ill. by J[ohn] B. Yeats. CONTENTS: “To the Secret Rose”; “The Crucifixion of the Outcast”; “Out of the Rose”; “The Wisdom of the King”; “The Heart of the Spring”; “The Curse of the Fires and of  the Shadows”; “The Old Men of the Twilight”; “Costello, the Proud, of Oona the daughter of Dermott and of the Bitter Tongue”; [identical except for t.p. - i.e., cancelled title leaf; for sale in Ireland only; 20cm.; copies held in BL, Liverpool UL &c.];
  • The Secret Rose; Rosa Alchemica; The Tables of the Law; The Adoration of the Magi; John Sherman; and Dhoya[,] being the seventh volume of the collected works in verse and prose of William Butler Yeats (Stratford-on-Avon: Shakespeare Head Press [i.e., Bullen] MCMVIII [1908] ), [6], 299 p, [3] p., plate [frontis.]; 23cm.
  • The Secret Rose [another edn.] (Bullen 1913) [as 1897];
  • The Secret Rose (London: Macmillan 1927), vii, 182pp., ill. by Norah McGuinness [2 lvs. of pls., some col.; 23 cm.; “Stories of Red Hanrahan” rewritten with the help of Lady Gregory.]
  • Do., as Mythologies (London: Macmillan 1959, 1978, 1982 &c.), vii, 261pp. [Contents: The Celtic Twilight; The Secret Rose; Stories of Red Hanrahan; Rosa Alchemica; The Tables of the Law; The Adoration of the Magi; Per amica silentia lunae.];
  • The Secret Rose: Stories by W. B. Yeats: A Variorum Edition, ed. Phillip L. Marcus, Warwick Gould & Michael J. Sidnell (Cornell UP 1981), xxxiv, 271pp., and Do. [2nd Edn., rev. & enl.] London: Macmillan 1992), xlvii, 297pp., ill., ports.;
  • The Secret Rose: Stories by W. B. Yeats, ed. by Warwick Gould, Phillip L. Marcus & Michael J. Sidnell [2nd edn., rev. & enl.] (London: Macmillan 1992), xlvii, 297pp.
Translations
  • Die chymische Rose, trans. by Herberth E. Herlitschka ((Hellerau: Jakob Hegner 1927), 220pp. [copy in TCD Lib. & Leeds].
  • Les histoires de la rose secrête, trans. [...] sous la direction de Jacqueline Genet [Centre de littérature, linguistique et civilisation des pays de langue anglaise de l'Université de Caen] (Presses universitaires de Lille 1984), 164pp.

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See also ...

Early Poems and Stories of W. B. Yeats (London: Macmillan 1925) contains The Secret Rose [pp.317-94] and Stories of Red Hanrahan (1897 [i.e., incl. in The Secret Rose], ‘rewritten in 1907 with Lady Gregory’s Help’) [pp.397-459]; Rosa Alchemica [“The Tables of the Law” and “The Adoration of the Magi” - with contents listed only at the front [viz., p.x], and without the dedication to “AE” prev. given in the 1897 edition.

Contents section devoted to The Secret Rose [317-94, with sep. t.p.; with epigraphs on verso, p.317-18]:

“To the Secret Rose” [319]
“The Crucifixion of the Outcast” [321]
“Out of the Rose” [334]
“The Wisdom of the King” [344]
“The Heart of the Spring” [352]
“The Curse of the Fires and of the Shadows” [360]
“The Men of the Twilight” [369]
“Costello the Proud, McDermott’s Daughter, and the Bitter Tongue” [376]

Note: The stories of the original volume have been somewhat reordered in this collection while those associated with Red Hanrahan have been allocated a separate section (though sharing the same date of publication - viz., 1897). Moreover, two stories in The Sacred Rose have been omitted here: “The Binding of the Hair” and “Where There is Nothing, There is God”. For full contents of this volume - including early poetry collections - see infra. See also the dedication to Ashe King (pp.v-vi), and the closing bibliographical “Notes” (pp.527-28), both given in full under Quotations, infra.

See full-text version, in RICORSO Library, via index or attached.
 
Mythologies (Macmillan 1959, 1978, 1982, &c.), 369pp. - contains The Celtic Twilight, The Secret Rose, Red Hanrahan, Rosa Alchemica, “Tables of the Law”, “Adoration of the Magi”, Per Amica Silentia Lunae; Do. [another edn.; based on 1925 Edn.] (Kessinger 2003), 376pp. - available at Google Books [online; accessed 12.03.2012.] See full contents, infra.
W. B. Yeats / Short Fiction, ed., with an introduction and notes by G. J. Watson (London: Penguin Books 1995) [xliii, 264pp.] - CONTENTS [v]; Acknowledgements [vii]; A textual and Editorial Introduction [ix-xv]; Abbreviations [xvii]; Introduction [xix-xliii]; John Sherman (1891) [1]; Dhoya (1891) [65]; The Secret Rose with The Tables of the Law and The Adoration of the Magi (1897) [77]; from Stories from Red Hanrahan (1905) [221]; Appendices - I. Yeats and Ireland’s Legendary History [231]; II. Glossary of Yeats’s Place Names [239]; Notes [239]. (See full contents, infra.)

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Stories of Red Hanrahan [orig. 1897 - followed by a new edition re-written with Lady Gregory] (Dun Emer Press 1904 [actually 1905]), [8], 58, [6]pp., ill. by wodcuts [‘rewritten in 1907 with Lady Gregory’s Help’; ltd. ed. of 500 copies; 21cm.] - CONTENTS: “Red Hanrahan”; “The Twisting of the Rope”; “Hanrahan and Cathleen the Daughter of Hoolihan”; “Red Hanrahan’s Curse”; “Hanrahan’s Vision”; “The Death of Hanrahan”. [Note all the stories prev. printed before revision in The Secret Rose (1897) except “Red Hanrahan”, which is new.]

Red Hanrahan, and The Secret Rose, illustrated and decorated by Nora McGuinness (London: Macmillan & Co. 1927), vii, 182pp., 8°/23cm, [selections; 2 lvs. of pls. incl. front; some col. ills.]

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The Works of William Blake, […] Poetic, Symbolic, and Critical Edition / Ed. with lithographs of the illustrated “Prophetic books”, and a memoir and interpretation by Edwin John Ellis and William Butler Yeats, 3 vols. (London: Bernard Quaritch 1893) [ltd. edn. 500; Wade 218], and Do. [NY: AMS Press 1973].

See Gerald Eades Bentley & Martin K. Nurmi, A Blake Bibliography: Annotated List of Works, Studies, and Blakeana (Minnesota UP 1964) - cites items by Yeats:

294. The Works of William Blake, Poetic, Symbolic, and Critical. Ed. with Lithographs of the Illustrated “Prophetic Books,” and a Memoir and Interpretation by Edwin John Ellis and William Butler Yeats. In Three Vols. London, 1892. “The Memoir” is Vol. I, pp.1-72. “The Literary Period” is Vol. I, pp.175-232. “The Symbolic System” is Vol. I, pp.235-420. “Interpretation and Paraphrased Commentary” is Vol. II, pp.3-301. “Blake the Artist” is Vol. II, pp.405-435. All of Blakes works are in Vol. III. There are 296 plates. / The lithographs include complete facsimiles of Thel, Vision of the daughters of Albion, The Song of Los, America, Europe, Mitlon (45 plates), and Jerusalem, in all of which the quality is poor. /

 

[With comments:] On May 3rd 1900 Yeats wrote: ‘The writing of this book is mainly Ellis’s. The thinking is as much mine as his. The biography is by him. He wrote and trebled in size a biography of mine. The greater part of the “symbolic system” is my writing; the rest of the book was written by Ellis working over short accounts of the books by me, except in the case of the “literary period”, the account of the minor poems, and the account of Blake’s art theories which are all his own except in so far as we disucssed everything together.” See Hazard Adams [Blake and Yeats: The Contrary Vision (Ithaca NY: Cornell UP 1955], no. 610, p.47. / The enthusiasm and comprehensiveness of this work are of considerable historical importance, but the reproductions are unreliable, the transcriptions inaccurate, the biography surprisingly fictional, and the criticism and interpretation throughout colored by the editor’s peculiar preconceptions. The work is likely to prove useful only to adepts in both Blake and Yeats. (p.74.)

[ See also notes from The Works ... &c. and other editions of Blake made by Yeats, in RICORSO Library > “Authors” > Yeats - as attached. ]

Also lists -

240A. The Poems of William Blake. Ed. W. B. Yeats. London, 1893. B. London & NY. [1905] The Muses Library. C. Mr William Butler Yeats introduces the Poetical Works of William Blake. London. 1910. Books that Marked Epochs. D. Poems of William Blake. NY. [1920] Modern Library. [See 294.] The introductions are pp.xv-liii in A; pp.xi-lxix in B; pp.xi-xlix in C; pp.xi-xli in D. Yeats’s introduction is incorporated int no.f208, in Japanese. (p.69.)
[...]

Note: NLI Catalogue listing Yeats’s vellum bound copy of his edition of Blake is described in Wade as item, 218: with manuscript note in ink on front flyleaf of volume 1, in W. B. Yeats's own hand ‘The writing of this book ... [etc.]’, signed ‘WBY, May 1900’; also manuscript annotations and revisions in Yeats’s own hand throughout all three volumes; binder's ink stamp to verso of front free endpaper in all three volumes: ‘Bound by Mudie’; 3 volumes: illustrations, portraits, facsimiles; 27 cm. Bibl. A descriptive catalog of W. B. Yeats's library, Edward O'Shea. - New York; London: Garland, 1985. page 34. Provenance: YL 220 - From the Library of W. B. Yeats.

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Works on Blake relating to Yeats held in the National Library of Ireland - Catalogue [online]; accessed 21.04.2015.
  • The Works of William Blake: Poetic, Symbolic, and Critical, ed. with lithographs of the illustrated “Prophetic books”, and a memoir and interpretation by Edwin John Ellis and William Butler Yeats; in three volumes (London: Bernard Quaritch 1893) [Yeats's vellum bound copy; Wade, 218; manuscript note in ink on front flyleaf of Vol. 1, in W. B. Yeats’s hand [‘The writing of this book [... &c.]’], signed ‘WBY, May 1900’; MS annotations and revisions in Yeats’s own hand throughout all three volumes [YL 220].
  • S. Foster Damon, William Blake: His Philosophy and Symbols (London: Constable & Co. 1924), xv, 487pp., ill.; 27 cm. [YL 463; see note].
  • Poems of William Blake [Modern Library] (NY: Boni and Liveright 19[--]), xli, 278pp. 17cm.; Wade 222] Another copy from Padraig O Broin Collection [LO 8290].
  • Poems of William Blake (London & New York: G. Routledge [1905]), xlix, 277pp.
  • Poetical Works of William Blake, [ed and intro. by] Wiliam Butler Yeats [Books that Marked Epochs ser., Vol. 2.] (London: George Routledge 1910), xlix, [2], 277pp.; 16.1 cm.
  • Poems of William Blake [Muses’ Library] (London & New York: George Routledge & Sons; E.P. Dutton & Co. [q.d.]).
  • Frederick Tatham, ed., The Letters of William Blake: Together with a Life, edited from the original manuscripts with an introduction and notes by Archibald G. B. Russell; with 12 illustrations (London: Methuen [1905]), xlvii, 237, 40pp., ill. [ills., ports., folded facs.; 23 cm.; with author’s inscription on front flyleaf: ‘W.B. Yeats / gratefully / from Archie Russell / 24 October 1906’ [YL 203].
  • Ideas of Good and Evil, by W. B. Yeats. (London: A. H. Bullen 1903), vii, 341pp., 20cm. [Wade No. 44; LO 9427 from the Joseph Campbell Collection; also a signed presentation copy from the author to Annie Horniman as LO 9372; another inscribed to ‘George Pollexfen from his nephew, W. B. Yeats, 1903’ as LO 9643, with a bookplate of J. O. Edwards.]
  • A Lexical Concordance to the Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley: An attempt to classify every word found therein according to its signification compiled and arranged by F.S. Ellis (London: Bernard Quaritch, 1892),  xi, 818pp.; 28cm. [YL 628]

[Note that Bernard Quaritch was friendly with Edward Fitzgerald, author of The Rubai'yat of Omar Khayyam, and issued a collection of letters exchanged between them in 1924. Horace Quaritch was his successor in the firm.]

  •  MS letter from Yeats to Quaritch enquiring about a possible review by Richard Le Gallienne (publ. May 1893) and addressed Lonsdale House, St Lawrence Rd., Clontarf [MS 41,882 /1-2]
Also by Damon:
  • S. Foster Damon, A Blake Dictionary: The Ideas and Symbols of William Blake (Brown UP 1965), xii, 460, ill. [NLI] - being reformulation of the William Blake: His Philosophy and Symbols (1924) [orig. as unaccepted Harvard thesis]. See also reprint of Blake Dictionary, ed. Morris Eaves (Brown UP 2013) - online.

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Poems of William Blake, ed. & intro. by W. B. Yeats (editions of 1893, 1910, 1920, &c.)
1.
First edition: [Yeats solo,] ed., The Poems of William Blake [The Muses’ Library] ((London: Lawrence & Bullen 1893), and Do. (New York: Scribner 1893), liv., 252pp., ill. [pl. port.] [Contents: Introduction; Poetical sketches; Songs of innocence; Songs of experience; Ideas of good and evil; The prophetic books; Prose fragments.]
2.
Another edn. as The Poems of William Blake, edited by W. B. Yeats [The Muses’ Library] (LondonG. Routledge & Sons [1905]), xlix, 277pp. [ill., port.], 8° [Query date]
3.
Mr. William Butler Yeats introduces the Poetical Works of William Blake (London: George Routledge & Sons. Ltd. 1910), xlix, [1], 277, [7]pp., 15cm. [spine in calf; gold line; boards in cloth] Titlepage: Mr William Butler Yeats introduces the Poetical Works of William Blake, born in 1757, died in 1827 as the second volume in the series of “Books that marked Epochs”, published in the year 1910 by GEORGE ROUTLEDGE […, &c.] (reiss. of Muses' Library Edn. of 1905.)
CONTENTS. Introduction, xi-xlix; Poetical Sketches 3-44 [incls. King Edward the Third, pp.17-44]; Songs of Innocence [47-62]; Songs of Experience [65-85]; Ideas of Good and Evil [89-144]; The Prophetic Books [147-236]; Prose Fragments [239]; Notes [261]. Notes: Includes bibliographical references. See also Do. [another edn.]
4.
Another edn. as The Poems of William Blake (NY: E. P. Dutton & Co [1910]), xlix, [1], 277, [7]pp., 15cm. [rep. of Routledge 1910 edn.]
5.
Another edn., as Poems of William Blake, edited by William Butler Yeats [The Modern Library] (NY: Boni & Liveright 1920), xli, [1], 278pp., 17 cm. [rep. of 1920 edn.]
 
Another edn., as Poems of William Blake, edited by W. B. Yeats [The Muses' Library] (Harvard UP 1969).
 
Collected poems / William Blake, edited by W.B. Yeats; with a new introduction by Tom Paulin (London & NY: Routledge 2002), xliii, 256pp. [21 cm]. (See extracts from Yeats’s Introduction in Ricorso Library, “Major Authors”, infra.)

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Editions of “The Tables of the Law” & “The Adoration of the Magi” (1897, 1904, 1908, &c.)
 

Short view: “The Tables of the Law” and “The Adoration of the Magi”, 1897; rep. in 1904, incl. in Works, Vol. 7 (1908); incl. in Poems and Stories (1925); incl. in Works of W. B. Yeats, Vol. VII (1908); afterwards in Mythologies (1959); also in Watson, ed., Short Fiction, Penguin 1995.

1.
The Tables of the Law [and] The Adoration of the Magi ([London:] [priv. edn.:] [Bullen] 1897 [in Roman]), 47pp. [110 numbered copies; shows Lawrence & Bullen’s device but not the name; printed by R. Clay & Sons. London & Bungay; carmine red buckram; spine with golden letters, title given horizontally as “The Tables of Law” with author’s name below ditto, on two lines - i.e., W. B. / Yeats; notice on title verso says ‘originally intended to follow “Rosa Alchemica” in The Secret Rose.’]
2.
The Tables of the Law [and] The Adoration of the Magi [Vigo Cabinet Series, No. 17] (London: Elkin Mathews [Vigo St.] 1904), 60, ivpp. [17cm.]; both stories printed ‘some years previously’ - Pref.; printed by R. Folkard & Son; Wade 25; pref. includes remarks on Joyce as ‘a young man in Ireland the other day, who liked them very much’; COPAC records a copy owned by Forrest Reid.]
3.
[The Tables of the Law. The Adoration of the Magi, in] The Collected Works of William Butler Yeats, Vol. 7 (Stratford-on-Avon: Shakespeare Head Press 1908), 229pp. [Contents: The Secret Rose. Rosa Alchemica. The Tables of the Law. The Adoration of the Magi. John Sherman and Dhoya, being the seventh volume of the collected works in verse & prose of William Butler Yeats imprinted at the Shakespeare Head Press Stratford-on-Avon MCMVIII [1908].
 

The Tables of the Law [and] The Adoration of the Magi (Stratford-on-Avon: Shakespeare Head Press 1914), 35pp. [pp.1-22; pp.25-35; ltd. edn. of 510 copies; green board cover with title The Tables of the Law / The Adoration of the Magi / by W. B. Yeats [all caps, justified]; printed A. H. Bullen; Wade 26 - copy No. 17 held in Senate House, Univ. of London; No. 41 in TCD Library; copy No. 311 held in California Univ. Libraries - available at Gutenberg Project - online];

[As single works, e.g., “Tables of the Law”, [4], 35, [1]pp.; 19 cm.]
4.
[The Tables of the Law. The Adoration of the Magi, in] Mythologies (London: Macmillan 1959) - containing The Celtic Twilight, The Secret rose, Stories of Red Hanrahan. Rosa Alchemica, The tables of the law. The adoration of the Magi. Per amica silentia lunae.

Also included in Watson, ed., Short Fiction (Harmonsworth: Penguin 1995).

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Ideas of Good and Evil (London: A. H. Bullen 1903), 341pp. – CONTENTS: What Is ‘Popular Poetry’? [1]; Speaking To the Psaltery [16]; Magic [29]; The Happiest of the Poets [70]; The Philosophy of Shelley’s Poetry [90]; At Stratford-on-Avon [142]; William Blake and the Imagination (1908) [168]; William Blake and his Illustrations to the Divine Comedy [176]; Symbolism In Painting [226]; The Symbolism of Poetry [237]; The Theatre [257]; The Celtic Element In Literature [270]; The Autumn of the Body [296]; The Moods [306]; The Body of the Father Christian Rosencrux [308]; The Return of Ulysses [312]; Ireland And the Arts [320]; The Galway Plains [333]; Emotion of Multitude [339]. (See full-text version in RICORSO Library > "Irish Classics" > Yeats - via index or as attached.

Early Poems and Stories of W. B. Yeats (London: Macmillan 1925) contains The Secret Rose [pp.317-94] and Stories of Red Hanrahan (1897 [i.e., incl. in The Secret Rose], ‘rewritten in 1907 with Lady Gregory’s Help’) [pp.397-459]; “Rosa Alchemica”, “The Tables of the Law” and “The Adoration of the Magi”; Contents, p.x], and without the dedication to “AE” in the. 1897 edition.
CONTENTS (pp.vii-x)
   
    THE WANDERINGS OF USHEEN (1889) [1]
    CROSSWAYS (1889)—
  • The Song of the Happy Shepherd. 57
  • The Sad Shepherd. 60
  • The Cloak, the Boat, and the Shoes. 62
  • Anashuya and Vijaya. 65
  • The Indian Upon God. 70
  • The Indian To His Love. 72
  • The Falling of the Leayes. 74
  • Ephemera. 75
  • The Madness of King Goll. 77
  • The Stolen Child. 80
  • To An Isle In the Water. 83
  • Down by the Salley Gardens. 84
  • The Meditation of the Old Fisherman. 85
  • The Ballad of Father O’Hart. 86
  • The Ballad of Moll Magee. 88
  • The Ballad of the Foxhunter. 91
    THE ROSE (1893)—
  • To the Rose Upon the Rood of Time. 99
  • Fergus and the Druid. 101
  • Cuchulain’s Fight With the Sea. 104
  • The Rose of the World. 109
  • The Rose of Peace. 110
  • The Rose of Battle. 111
  • A Faery Song I13
  • The Lake Isle of Innisfree. 114
  • A Cradle Song. 115
  • The Pity of Love. 116
  • The Sorrow of Love. 117
  • When you Are Old. 118
  • The White Birds. 119
  • A Dream of Death. 120
  • A Dream of a Blessed Spirit. 121
  • Who Goes With Fergus?. 122
  • The Man Who Dreamed of Faeryland. 123
  • The Dedication of a Book of Stories Selected From the Irish Novelists. 126
  • The Lamentation of the Old Pensioner. 128
  • The Ballad of Father Gilligan 129
  • The Two Trees. 132
  • To Ireland In the Coming Times. 134
    THE CELTIC TWILIGHT (1893)—
  • A Teller of Tales. 139
  • Belief and Unbelief. 141
  • Mortal Help. 143
  • A Visionary. 145
  • Village Ghosts. 150
  • “Dust Hath Closed Helen’s Eye”. 159
  • A Knight of the Sheep. 171
  • An Enduring Heart. 175
  • The Sorcerers. 179
  • The Devil. 184
  • Happy and Unhappy theologians. 185
  • The Last Gleeman. 192
  • Regina, Regina Pigmeorum, Veni. 201
  • “And Fair, Fierce Women”. 205
  • Enchanted Woods. 209
  • Miraculous Creatures. 216
  • Aristotle of the Books. 219
  • The Swine of the Gods. 219
  • A Voice. 221
  • Kidnappers. 223
  • The Untiring Ones. 232
  • Earth, Fire and Water. 236
  • The Old Town. 238
  • The Man and His Boots. 241
  • A Coward. 243
  • The Three O’Byrnes and the Evil Faeries. 245
  • Drumcliff and Rosses. 247
  • The Thick Skull of the Fortunate. 256
  • The Religion of & Sailor. 259
  • Concerning the Nearness Together of Heaven, Earth, and Purgatory. 261
  • The Eater, of Precious Stones,. 263
  • Our Lady of the Hills. 265
  • The Golden Age. 268
  • A Remonstrance With Scotsmen for Having Soured the Disposition of their Ghosts and Faeries. 270
  • War. 275
  • The Queen and the Fool. 278
  • The Friends Op the People of Faery. 285
  • Dreams That Have No Moral. 295
  • Bt the Roadside. 312
  • Into the Twilight. 315
    THE SECRET ROSE (1897)—
  • To the Secret Rose. 319
  • The Crucifixion of the Outcast. 321
  • Out of the Rose. 334
  • The Wisdom of the king. 344
  • The Heart of the Spring. 352
  • The Curse of the Fires and of the Shadows. 360
  • The Old Men of the Twilight. 369
  • Proud Costello, MacDermot’s Daughter and the Bitter Tongue. 376
    STORIES OF RED HANRAHAN—
  • Red Hanrahan. 397
  • The Twisting of the Rope. 413
  • Hanrahan and Cathleen, the Daughter of Hoolihan. 424
  • Red Hanrahan’s Curse. 430
  • Hanrahan’s Vision. 440
  • The Death of Hanrahan. 448
    ROSA ALCHEMICA—
  • Rosa Alchemica. 465
  • The Tables of the Law. 498
  • The Adoration of the Magi 517
    NOTES 527

See RICORSO digitised variorum of The Secret Rose - editions of 1897 & 1925 - in RICORSO Library > Irish Classics > W. B. Yeats - via index or attached.

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Essays and Introductions (1961). - CONTENTS: Introduction, pp.vii-xi; ESSAYS, I: Ideas of Good and Evil, What Is Popular Poetry? [3]; Speaking To The Psaltery [13]; Magic [18]; The Happiest of The Poets [53]; The Philosophy of Shelley’s Poetry [65]; At Stratford-on-Avon [96]; William Blake and the Imagination [111]; William Blake And His Illustrations to the Divine Comedy [116]; Symbolism in Painting [146]; The Symbolism of Poetry [153]; The Theatre [165]; The Celtic Element in Literature [173]; The Autumn of The Body [189]; The Moods [195]; The Body of the Father Christian Rosencrux [196]; The Return of Ulysses [198]; Ireland and the Arts [203]; The Galway Plains [211]; Emotion of Multitude [215] II: The Cutting of an Agate, Certain Noble Plays of Japan [221]; The Tragic Theatre [138]; Poetry and Tradition [246]; Discoveries [261]; Preface to the First Edition of The Well of The Saints [298]; Preface to the first edition of John M. Synge’s Poems and Translations [306]; J. M. Synge and the Ireland of His Time [311]; John Shawe-Taylor [343]; Art and Ideas [346]; Edmund Spenser [356]. LATER ESSAYS AND INTRODUCTIONS. Gitanjali [387]; Bishop Berkeley [396]; My Friend’s Book (A.E.’s Songs and Fountains ) [412]; Prometheus Unbound [419]; An Indian Monk [426]; Louis Lambert [438]; The Holy Mountain [448]; The Mandukya Upanishad [474]; Parnell [486]; Modern Poetry [491]; A General Introduction for My Work [509] An Introduction for My Plays [527-30; END]. Ill. [frontispiece Portrait of Yeats by John Butler Yeats, NGI]; photo port. of Yeats by Howard Coster, facing p.385].

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Mythologies (London: Macmillan 1959; rep. 1962, 1978, 1982, 1984, 1989 [...]), vii, 368pp, ill. [front. port.] CONTENTS [pp.vi-vii]:

The Celtic Twilight - “A Teller of Tales” [5]; “Belief and Unbelief” [7]; “Mortal Help” [9]; “A Visionary” [11]; “Village Ghosts” [15]; “‘Dust hath closed Helen’s Eye’” [22]; “A Knight of the Sheep” [31]; “An Enduring Heart” [34]; “The Sorcerers” [37]; “The Devil” [41]; “Happy and Unhappy Theologians” [42]; “The Last Gleeman” [47]; “Regina, Regina Pigmeorum, Veni” [54]; “‘And Fair, Fierce Women’” [57]; “Enchanted Woods” [670]; “Miraculous Creatures” [65]; “Aristotle of the Books” [66]; “The Swine of the Gods” [67]; “A Voice” [68]; “Kidnappers” [70]; “The Untiring Ones” [77]; “Earth, Fire and Water” [80]; “The Old Town” [81]; “The Man and His Boots” [83]; “A Coward” [85]; “The Three O’Byrnes and the Evil Faeries” [86]; “Drumcliff and Rosses” [8]; “The Thick Skull of the Fortunate” [95]; “The Religion of a Sailor” [97]; “Concerning the Nearness Together of Heaven, Earth and Purgatory” [98]; “The Eaters of Precious Stones” [100]; “Our Lady of the Hills” [101]; “The Golden Age” [104]; “A Remonstrance with Scotsmen for having Soured the Disposition of Their Ghosts and Faeries” [106]; “War” [110]; “The Queen and the Fool” [112]; “The Friends of the People of Faery” [117]; “Dreams that have no Moral” [125]; “By the Roadside” [138]; “Into the Twilight” [verse; 141].
The Secret Rose (1897; rev. 1907); [“To the Secret Rose” (verse); 145]; “The Crucifixion of the Outcast” [147]; “Out of the Rose” [157]; “The Wisdom of the King” [165]; “The Heart of the Spring” [171]; “The Curse of the Fires and the Shadows” [177]; “Where There is Nothing, There is God” [184]; “The Old Men of the Twilight” [191]; “Proud Costello, MacDermott’s Daughter, and of the Bitter Tongue” [196-210].

Stories of Red Hanrahan (1897; rev. 1907): “Red Hanrahan” [213]; “The Twisting of the Rope” [225]; “Hanrahan and Cathleen, the Daughter of Houlihan” [234]; “Red Hanrahan’s Curse” [238]; “Hanrahan’s Vision” [246]; “The Death of Hanrahan” [253].

Rosa Alchemica, The Tables of the Law, and The Adoration of the Magi (1897): Rosa Alchemica” [267]; “The Tables of the Law” [293]; “The Adoration of the Magi” [308].
Per Amica Silentia Lunae (1917): Prologue” [319]; “Ego Dominus Tuus” [321]; “Anima Hominis” [325]; “Anima Mundi” [343]; “Epilogue” [367-69; signed May 11 1917; another edn. 1925]. (Available in large part at Google Books - online; accessed 12.03.2012.)

Summary (COPAC on Mythologies): ‘This is Yeats the enchanted storyteller alongside Yeats the mystical visionary. “Rosa Alchemica” and “Per Amica Silentia Lunae” tell of his own esoteric imaginings and “Stories of Red Hanrahan” are tales of the supernatural he drew from the Irish folk tradition. Also cites Kirkus review: ‘The Celtic fondness of finding truth not in fact but in beauty is never so clearly manifest as in the works of William Butler Yeats. In this collection which consists of Irish myths, concisely retold by the author and of mystical-aesthetic speculations hinging on Rosacrucianism, Spiritualism, and occult Oriental studies, the reader is provided both with a clue to the mythology of Yeat’s works and to the workings of the poet’s mind, a mind which wove a gossamer web from out of the rough world of everyday Ireland and the fantastic universe of wild eyed fairies. Striving constantly for lack of sophistication, Yeats, himself, exposes a highly sophisticated mind, one which shifts at will from level to level of reality, taking as his companions such heterogeneous man as Aristotle, Hanrahan, and Dawson. In his retelling of the traditional Celtic stories (to which the bulk of this book is dedicated) Yeats demonstrates his prodigious ability to use an unembellished prose diction to the highest poetic effect, a talent which not only marks him as a uniquely gifted poet, but which has had a profound influence on the entire world of modern poetry. Despite a chronic tendency to mystify, the speculations of which the latter part of this collection are composed should provide a key to the work, the goals and the world of Yeats, “that dolphin torn, that gong tormented sea”. A volume of essays to follow.’ (See online; accessed 17.11.2011)

[Note: the author of summary and review are not given in COPAC. These show an ambitious, sympathetic and deeply considered grasp on the contents, literary treatment and the thematic organisation of the collection.]

See also Mythologies (London: Macmillan 1925, 1934); and Do. [2nd. edn. with additional plays] (1952) - reissued as Mythologies (1959) - as supra. See Do. [another edn.] ([Dublin:] Gill & Macmillan Dec. 1990) at Google Books - online.

[See remarks on editions of Mythologies and its antecedent, Early Poems and Stories (1925) - under Quotations, supra.]

Mythologies, ed. Warwick Gould & Deirdre Toomey [Variorum Edition] (London: Palgrave Macmillan 2005), cx, 545pp. [24cm]. CONTENTS: The Celtic Twilight; The Secret Rose; Stories of Red Hanrahan; Rosa Alchemica; The Tables of the Law; The Adoration of the Magi.

Mythologies [1st Touchstone Edn.] (NY: Simon & Schuster 1987, 1998), vii, 368pp. [25cm.] CONTENTS: The Celtic Twilight; The Secret Rose; Stories of Red Hanrahan; Rosa Alchemica; The Tables of the Law; The Adoration of the Magi; Per Amica Silentia Lunae.  

See also The Collected Works of William Butler Yeats in Verse and Prose of William Butler Yeats [Vol. 7]: “Rosa Alchemica”; “The Tables of the Law”; “The Adoration of the Magi”; John Sherman and Dhoya [Vol.7] (Imprinted at the Shakespeare Head Press Stratford-on-Avon, MCMVIII [1908]). 

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The Secret Rose and Other Stories [selected from Mythologies, 1959] (Dublin: Gill & Macmillan [n.d.]) [after Macmillan Edn. of 1959], 261pp. [title derived from the Shakespeare Head edition and not to be confused with The Secret Rose (1897) - listed in Works 1, supra.] CONTENTS. The Celtic Twilight: A Teller of Tales [5]; Belief and Unbelief [7]; Mortal Help [9]; A Visionary [11]; Village Ghosts [15]; “Dust Hath Closed Helen’s Eye” [22]; A Knight of the Sheep [31]; An Enduring Heart [34]; The Sorcerers [37]; The Devil [41]; Happy and Unhappy theologians [42]; the Last Gleeman [47]; Regina, Regina Pigmeorum, Veni [54]; “And Fair, Fierce Women” [57]; Enchanted Woods [60]; Miraculous Creatures [65]; Aristotle of the Books [66]; The Wine of the Gods [67]; A voice [68]; Kidnappers [70]; The Untiring Ones [77]; Earth, Fire and Water [80]; The Old Town [81]; The man and his Boots [83]; A Coward [85]; The Three O’Brynes and the Evil Fairies [86]; Drumcliff and Rosses [88]; The Thick Skull of the Fortunate [95]; The Religion of a Sailor [97]; Concerning the Nearness Together of Heaven, Earth and Purgatory [98]; The Eaters of Precious Stones [100]; Our Lady of the Hills [101]; The Golden Age [104] A Remonstrance with Scotsmen for Having Soured the Disposition of their Ghosts and Faeries [106]; War [11]; The Queen and the Fool [112]; The Friends of the People of Faery [117]; Dreams that Have No Moral [125]; By the Roadside [138]; Into the Twilight [141]. The Secret Rose (1897): To the Secret Rose [poem; 145]; The Crucifixion of the Outcast [147]; Out of the Rose [157]; The Wisdom of the Kind [165]; The Heart of the Spring [171]; The Curse of the Fires and of the Shadows [177]; Where There is Nothing, There is God [184]; The Old Men of the Twilight [191]; Proud Costello, MacDermot’s Daughter, and the Bitter Tongue [196]. Stories of Red Hanrahan (1897): Red Hanrahan [213]; The Twisting of the Rope [225]; Hanrahan and Cathleen, the Daughter of Houlihan [234]; Red Hanrahan’s Curse [238]; Hanrahan’s Vision [246]; The Death of Hanrahan [253].

Note: The contents of The Celtic Twilight as given here are appear in the table of contents under the title The Celtic Twilight (1893) but are actually those of The Celtic Twilight (1902) excepting for the Appendix entitled “The Four Winds of Desire” (listed by Robert Welch [ed.] in W. B. Yeats: Writings on Irish Folklore, Legend, and Myth, Penguin 1993, [Appendix,] pp.487-89, and given as text in Kathleen Raine, intro., The Celtic Twilight, Gerrards Cross: Colin Smythe, 1981, p.155-59.

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The Collected Plays of W. B. Yeats [with plays additional to the 1934 edition] (London: Macmillan 1952, 1960), 705pp. CONTENTS: Preface to the Fitst Edition (1934) [v]; Contents [vi]; The Countess Cathleen (1892), ded. ‘To Maud Gonne’ [1]; The Land of Heart’s Desire (1894), ded. ‘To Florence Farr’ [51]; Cathleen Ni Houlihan (1902) [73]; The Pot of Broth (1904) [ 89]; The King’s Threshold (1904) [105]; The Shadowy Waters (1911) [145]; Deirdre (1907) [169]; At the Hawk’s Well (1917) [205]; The Green Helmet (1910) [221]; On Baile’s Strand (1904) [245]; The Only Jealousy of Emer (1919) [279]; The Hour-Glass (1914) [297]; The Unicorn From The Stars (1908) [325]; The Player Queen (1922) [385]; The Dreaming of The Bones (1919’)[431]; Calvary (1920) [447]; The Cat and the Moon (1926) [459]; Sophocles’ King Oedipus (1928) [473]; Sophocles’ Oedipus At Colonus (1934) [519]; The Resurrection (1931) [577]; The Words upon the Window-Pane (1934). 595]; A Full Moon in March (1935) [619]; The King of the Great Clock Tower (1935) [631]; The Herne’s Egg (1938) [643]; Purgatory (1939) [679]; The Death of Cuchulain (1939) [691]; [FRONTISPIECE: W. B. Yeats, from a drawing by J. S. SARGENT, R.A

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The Collected Plays of W. B. Yeats, as Vol. 2 of The Collected Works of W. B. Yeats (Macmillan/Scribner), ed. Ann Saddlemyer (Basingstoke: Palgrave [Macmillan] 2001), 959pp., 22cm. [with music scores]. CONTENTS: Preface; Abbreviations. PART ONE: An Introduction for My Plays (1937); The Countess Cathleen (1892); The Land of Heart’s Desire (1894); Cathleen Ni Houlihan (1902); The Hour-Glass [in prose] (1903); The Pot of Broth (1904); The King’s Threshold (1904); On Baile’s Strand (1904); Deirdre (1907); The Unicorn from the Stars (1908); The Green Helmet (1910); The Shadowy Waters (1911); The Hour-Glass [in verse] (1914); Four Plays for Dancers (1921); At the Hawk’s Well (1917); The Dreaming of the Bones (1919); The Only Jealousy of Emer (1919); Calvary (1920); The Player Queen (1922); Sophocles’ King Oedipus (1928); Sophocles’ Oedipus at Colonus (1934); Wheels and Butterflies [More Plays for Dancers] (1934); The Cat and the Moon (1917); Fighting the Waves (1930); The Words Upon the Window-Pane (1930); The Resurrection (1931); The King of the Great Clock Tower (1934); A Full Moon in March (1935); The Herne’s Egg (1938); Purgatory (1938); The Death of Cuchulain (1939). PART TWO - ADDITIONAL PLAYS: Diarmuid and Grania (1901) Where There Is Nothing (1902). Appendices - A: Yeats’s Notes for the Unpublished Edition de Luxe and the Dublin Edition; Notes to Appendix A; B: Music for the Plays; Notes to Appendix B; Explanatory Notes; Textual Notes. [Note: plays additional to those in the 1934 & 1959 editions: Additional to those in the 1934, 1959 editions: Four Plays for Dancers (1921); Wheels and Butterflies [More Plays for Dancers] (1934); Fighting the Waves (1930). Plays with variant dates in the 1959 Edition: The Cat and the Moon (1926 [1959 sic]), The Words Upon the Window-Pane (1934 [1959 sic]), The King of the Great Clock Tower (1935 [1959 sic]), and Purgatory (1939 [1959 sic]).

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Richard J. Finneran, ed., [W. B. Yeats] The Collected Poems of W. B. Yeats [3rd edn.] (London: Macmillan 1983, 1984, &c.) [“W. B. Yeats: The Poems: Revised” on cover]; issued along with Editing Yeats’s Poems: A Reconsideration (1983), controversially follows the poem-order of 1933 Edn., sectioned into lyrical, narrative, and dramatic poems rather than chronological order of the original collections, followed in the 1950 edition; also incl. poems rejected from the canon by Yeats himself [i.e., in 1950 edn.] Note that A. N. Jeffares, A New Commentary to the Poems of W. B. Yeats (Macmillan 1984) is keyed into this edition as well as the Macmillan edition of 1950.]

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Denis Donoghue, transcribed & ed., Memoirs: Autobiography - A First Draft [&] Journal [by W. B. Yeats] (London: Macmillan 1972), pp.318. CONTENTS: Autobiography [for the years 1887-90, written in 1916-17 [pp.19-135]; Journal [pp.137-280]. Appendices: ‘Occult Notes and Diary, &c.’ [281]; ‘A Symbolic Artist and the Coming of Symbolic Art’ [287]; ““Althea Gyles”’ [287]; ‘William Sharp” [William Sharp by Elizabeth A. Sharp; 288]; ‘Gosse, Lady Gregory and Yeats’ [letters; 280]; ‘Proceedings of the American Society for Psychical Research [1911; 292]; ‘Key Passages from the Journal published in Estrangement and The Death of Synge ’ [2 cols.; 303; Index, 305. Note: ‘In the present volume errors of spelling and punctuation have been silently corrected’; ‘Yeats never mastered those skills’ and ‘readers of of a practical text do not take much pleasure in the editorial sic.’ (Intro., p.15.)

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Robert Welch, ed., with intro. & notes, W. B. Yeats / Writings on Irish Folklore, Legend and Myth [by W. B. Yeats] (Penguin Books 1993), 458pp.; Acknowledgements [xi]; A Textual and Editorial Note [xiii]; Abbreviations [xvii]; Introduction [xix]. CONTENTS: I: ‘Introduction to Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry (1888) [1]; 2: ‘The Irish Fairies’, from Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry (1888) [8]; 3: ‘Irish Fairies, Ghosts, Witches’, from Lucifer (1889) [19]; 4: ‘Scots and Irish Fairies’, from the Scots Observer (1889) [26]; 5: ‘Irish Wonders’, from the Scots Observer (1889) [30]; 6: ‘Village Ghosts’, from the Scots Observer (1889) [34; 7: ‘Kidnappers’, from the Scots Observer (1889) [39]; 8: ‘Columkille and Rosses, from the Scots Observer (1889) [44]; 9 ‘Bardic Ireland’, from the Scots Observer (1890) [50]; 10: ‘Tales from the Twilight’, from the Scots Observer (1890) [55]; 11: ‘Irish Fairies’, from the Leisure Hour ([Oct.] 1890) [60]; 31: ‘The Thick Skull of the Fortunate’, from The Celtic Twilight (1893) [127]; 32: ‘The Religion of a Sailor’, from The Celtic Twilight (1893) [129]; 33: ‘Concerning the Nearness Together of Heaven, Earth, and Purgatory’, from The Celtic Twilight (1893) [131]; 34: ‘The Eaters of Precious Stones’, from The Celtic Twilight (1893) [132]; 35: ‘The Golden Age’, from The Celtic Twilight (1893) [133]; 36: ‘The Evangel of Folk-Lore, from the Bookman (1894) [135]; 37: ‘The Tribes of Danu’, from the New Review (1897) [138]; 38: ‘The Prisoners of the Gods’, from the Nineteenth Century (1898) [155]; 39: ‘The Broken Gates of Death’, from the Fortnightly Review (1898) [172]; 40: ‘The Celtic Element in Literature’, from Cosmopolis (1898) [189]; 41: ‘Celtic Beliefs about the Soul’, from the Bookman (1898) [201]; 42: ‘The Academic Class and the Agrarian Revolution’, from the Daily Express (1899) [203]; 43: ‘A Note on “The Hosting of the Sidhe”’, from The Wind Among the Reeds (:1899) [208]; 44: ‘A Note On “The Host of the Air”’, from The Wind Among the Reeds (1899) [212]; 45: ‘A Note On “The Valley of the Black Pig”’, from The Wind Among the Reeds (1899) [216]; 46: ‘Ireland Bewitched’, from the Contemporary Review (1899) [219]; 47: ‘Dust Hath Closed Helen’s Eye’, from the Dome (1899) [240]; 48: ‘Maeve and Certain Irish Beliefs’, from Beltaine (1900) [147]; 49: ‘Irish Fairy Beliefs’, from the Speaker (1900) [250]; 50: ‘Irish Witch Doctors’, from the Fortnightly Review (1900) [253]; 51: ‘To D. P. Moran’s Leader’ (1900) [275]; 52: ‘The Fool of Faery’, from the Kensington (1901) [280]; 53: ‘By The Roadside’, from An Claidheamh Soluis (1901) [285]; 54: ‘New Chapters of the Celtic Twilight’, I’, from The Speaker (1902) [288]; 55: ‘New Chapters of the Celtic Twilight, II’, from The Speaker (1902) [291]; 56: ‘New Chapters of the Celtic Twilight, III’, from The Speaker (1902) [295]; 57: ‘New Chapters of the Celtic Twilight, IV’, from The Speaker (1902) [299]; 58: ‘New Chapters of the Celtic Twilight, V’, from The Speaker (1902) [305]; 59: ‘Away’ [308; prev. publ. in Fortnightly Review, April 1902 - being 6th and final item arising from his folklore collaboration with Lady Gregory]; 60: Preface to Lady Gregory’s Cuchulain of Muirthemne (1902) [327]; 61: ‘Dreams that have No Moral’, from The Celtic Twilight (1902) [335]; 62: ‘Poets and Dreamers’, from the New Liberal Review (1903) [344]; 63: ‘A Canonical Book’, from the Bookman (1903) [348]; 64: Preface to Lady Gregory’s Gods and Fighting Men (1904) [352]; 65: ‘Witches And Wizards And Irish Folk-Lore’, from Lady Gregory’s Visions and Beliefs in the West of Ireland (1920) [364]; 66: ‘Compulsory Gaelic: A Dialogue’, from the Irish Statesman (1924) [374]; 67: Introduction to The Midnight Court (1926) [384]; 68: ‘The Great Blasket’, from the Spectator (2 June 1933) [389]; NOTES [392]; GLOSSARY [448]; APPENDIX: Contents of the 1893 and 1902 Editions of The Celtic Twilight [456].

 

John Frayne, ed., Uncollected Prose by W. B. Yeats, 2 vols. (London: Macmillan 1970 & 1975), Contents - under RICORSO Bibliography > “Scholars” [Frayne, Uncoll. Prose, Vol. 1 as attached; Vol. 2 - as attached.] Note: pagination refers to Frayne’s edition not the original publications.
  • ‘The Poetry of Sir Samuel Ferguson - I’ (Irish Fireside, Oct. 9, 1886), p.81
  • ‘The Poetry of Sir Samuel Ferguson - II’ (Dublin University Review, Nov. 1886), p.87.
  • ‘The Poetry of R. D. Joyce‘’ (Irish Fireside, Nov. 27, Dec. 4, 1886), p.104.
  • ‘Clarence Mangan’ (Irish Fireside, March 12, 1887), p.114.
  • ‘Miss Tynan’s New Book [review of Shamrocks]’ (Irish Fireside, July 9, 1887), p.119.
  • ‘The Prose and Poetry of Wilfred Blunt [review of Love Sonnets of Proteus]’ (United Ireland, Jan. 28, 1888), p.122.
  • ‘Irish Fairies, Ghosts, Witches, &c.’ (Lucifer, Jan. 15, 1889), p.130.
  • ‘Irish Wonders [review of D. R. McAnally’s Irish Wonders’ (Scots Observer, March 30, 1889), p.138.
  • ‘William Carleton [review of Red-Haired Man’s Wife’ (Scots Observer, Oct. 19, 1889), p.141.
  • ‘Popular Ballad Poetry of Ireland’ (Leisure Hour, Nov. 1889), p.146.
  • ‘Bardic Irelard [review of S. Bryant’s Celtic Ireland’ (Scots Observer, Jan. 4, 1890), p.162.
  • ‘Carleton as an Irish Historian’ (Nation, Jan. 11, 1890), p.166.
  • ‘Tales from the Twilight [review of Lady Wilde’s Ancient Cures]’ (Scots Observer, March 1, 1890), p.169.
  • ‘Poetry and Science in Folk-Lore’ (Academy, Oct. 11, 1890), p.173.
  • ‘Irish Fairies’ (Leisure Hour, Oct. 1890), p.175.
  • ‘An Exhibition at William Morris’s [review]’ (Providence Sunday Journal, Oct. 26, 1890), p.182.
  • ‘Irish Folk Tales [review of D. Hyde’s Beside the Fire]’ (National Observer, Feb. 28, 1891), p. 186.
  • ‘Plays by an Irish Poet [review of J. Todhunter’s A Sicilian Idyll]’ (United Ireland, July 11, 189I), p.190.
  • ‘Clarence Mangan’s Love Affair’ (United Ireland, Aug. 22, 1891), p.194.
  • ‘A Reckless Century (Irish Rakes and Duellists)’ (United Ireland, Sept. 12, 1891), p.198.
  • ‘Oscar Wilde’s Last Book [review of Lord Arthur Savile’s Crime]’ (United Ireland, Sept. 26, 1891), p.202.
  • ‘The Young Ireland League’ (United Ireland, Oct. 3, 1891), p.206.
  • ‘A Poet We Have Neglected [review of W. Allingham’s collected poems]’ (United Ireland, Dec. 12, 1891), p.[?]
  • ‘The New “Speranza” [on Maud Gonne]’ (United Ireland, Jan. 16, 1892), p.212.
  • ‘Dr. Todhunter’s Irish Poems [review of The Banshee [United Ireland, Jan. 23, 1892), p.215.
  • ‘Clovis Huges on Ireland’ (United Ireland, Jan. 30, 1892), p.218.
  • ‘The Irish Intellectual Capital: Where Is It?’ (United Ireland, May 14, 1892), p.222.
  • Young Ireland [review of Duffy’s Young Ireland] (The Bookman, Jan. 1897) 33.
  • Mr. John O’Leary [review of O’Leary’s Recollections of Fenians and Fenianism (The Bookman, Feb. 1897), p.35.
  • The ’98 Centenary (United Ireland, March 20, 1897), p.37.
  • Mr. Arthur Symons’ New Book [review of Amoris Victima] (The Bookman, April, 1897), p.38.
  • Miss Fiona Macleod [review of Macleod’s [William Sharp’s] Spiritual Tales, Tragic Romances and Barbaric Tales (The Sketch, April 28, 1897), p.42.
  • The Treasure of the Humble [review of Maeterlinck’s The Treasure of the Humble (The Bookman, July, 1897), p.45.
  • Mr. Standish O’Grady’s Flight of the Eagle [review] (The Bookman, Aug. 1897), p.47.
  • Aglavaine and Selysette [review of Maeterlinck’s Aglavaine and Selysette (The Bookman, Sept. 1897), p.51.
  • The Tribes of Danu (The New Review, Nov. 1897), p.54.
  • Three Irish Poets [article on A.E. Nora Hopper and Lionel Johnson] (The Irish Homestead, Dec. 1897), p.70.
  • The Prisoners of the Gods (Nineteenth Century, Jan. 1898), p.74.
  • Mr. Lionel Johnson’s Poems [review of Ireland, with Other Poems (The Bookman, Feb. 1898), p.88.
  • Mr. Rhys’ Welsh Ballads [review] (The Bookman, April, 1898), p.91.
  • The Broken Gates of Death (Fortnightly Review, April, 1898), p.94.
  • Le Mouvement Celtique: Fiona Macleod [article with a review of The Laughter of Peterkin ( L’Irlande Libre, April I, 1898), p.108.
  • ‘A.E.’s Poems [review of The Earth Breath (The Sketch, April 6, 1898), p.111.
  • Le Mouvement Celtique: 11 - M. John O’Leary (L’Irlande Libre, June I, 1898), p.113.
  • Mr. Lionel Johnson and Certain Irish Poets (Dublin Daily Express, Aug. 27, 1898), p.115.
  • Celtic Beliefs About the Soul [review of Meyer’s and Nutt’s translation of The Voyage of Bran (The Bookman, Sept. 1898), p.118.
  • The Poetry of ‘A.E.’ (Dublin Daily Express, Sept. 3, 1898), p.121.
  • The Poems and Stories of Miss Nora Hopper (Dublin Daily Express, Sept. 24, 1898), p.124.
  • John Eglinton and Spiritual Art (Dublin Daily Express, Oct. 29, 1898), p.128.
  • A Symbolic Artist and the Coming of Symbolic Art (The Dome, Dec. 1898), p.132.
  • Important Announcement -Irish Literary Theatre (Dublin Daily Express, Jan. 12, 1899), p.137.
  • The Irish Literary Theatre (Dublin Daily Express, Jan. 14, 1899), p.139.
  • High Crosses of Ireland (Dublin Daily Express, Jan. 28, 1899), p.142.
  • Notes on Traditions and Superstitions (Folk-Lore, March, 1899), p.145.
[...; cont.]
[...; cont.]

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George J. Watson, ed., W. B. Yeats / Short Fiction (London: Penguin Books 1995) [xliii, 264pp.] - CONTENTS [v]; Acknowledgements [vii]; A Textual and Editorial Introduction [ix-xv]; Abbreviations [xvii]; Introduction [xix-xliii]; John Sherman (1891) [1]; Dhoya (1891) [65]; The Secret Rose with The Tables of the Law and The Adoration of the Magi (1897) [77] - The Binding of the Hair [83]; The Wisdom of the King [88]; Where There is Nothing, There is God [94]; The Crucifixion of the Outcast [99]; Out of the Rose [107]; The Curse of the Fires and of the Shadows [115]; The Heart of the Spring [119]; Of Costello the Proud, of Oona the Daughter of Dermott and of the Bitter Tongue [124]; The Book of the Great Dhoul and Hanrahan the Red [138]; The Twisting of the Rope and Hanrahan the Red [145]; Kathleen the Daughter of Houlihan and Hanrahan the Red [151]; The Curse of Hanrahan the Red [155]; The Vision of Hanrahan the Red [160]; The Death of Hanrahan the Red [165]; The Rose of Shadow [171]; From Stories from Red Hanrahan (1905) [219] - Red Hanrahan [221]; Appendices: I. Yeats and Ireland’s Legendary History [231]; II. Glossary of Yeats’s Place Names Notes [239].

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Yeats’s Vision Papers, gen. ed. George Mills Harper, gen. ed. [assisted by Mary Jane Harper, et al.] (London: Macmillan 1992-2001) - Vol. I: The Automatic Script (5 November 1917-18 June 1918), ed. Steve Adams, Barbara Frieling & Sandra Sprayberry (London: Macmillan/Iowa UP 1992), xiii,596pp.; Vol. II: The Automatic Script (25 June 1918-29 March 1920), ed. Adams, Frieling & Sprayberry (London: Macmillan/Iowa UP 1992); Vol. III: Sleep and Dream Notebooks & Vision Notebooks 1 & 2 [Card File], ed. Robert Martinich & Margaret Mills Harper (London: Macmillan/Iowa UP 1992), xiii, 444pp., ill. [facs.]; Vol. IV: George Mills Harper & Margaret Mills Harper, assisted by Richard W. Stoops, Discoveries of Michael Robartes Version B [“the great wheel” and “the 28 embodiments”] (London: Macmillan/Palgrave 2001), xiv, 276pp., ill. 24cm. Note: The Vision Papers incorporate over 3,600pp. of original MSS made at 450 sittings over 20 months.

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The Poems of William Blake, ed. William Butler Yeats (Bullen 1893; rep. Routledge 1905, &c.)

[ Not to be confused with the Works of William Blake, ed. Edwin Ellis & Yeats, 3 vols. (London: Bernard Quaritch 1893). ]

  • The Poems of William Blake [The Muses’ Library] (London: Lawrence & Bullen; New York: Scribner 1893), liv., 252pp., 27cm. [Contents: Poetical sketches; Songs of innocence; Songs of experience; Ideas of good and evil; The prophetic books; Prose fragments; Wade 219; O’Shea 208 - NLI copy from WBY’s library has his errata and a long note in ink - see note];
  • Do. [rep. as] Mr William Butler Yeats introduces the Poetical Works of William Blake (London: George Routledge & Sons. Ltd. 1905), xlix, 277pp., ill. [port.], 8°;
  • Do. [rep.] [Books That Marked Epochs, No. 2] (London: George Routledge; New York: E. P. Dutton & Co 1910), xlix, 277pp.;
  • Do. [Modern Library] (NY: Boni & Liveright [1920]), xli, 278pp. [17 cm];
  • Do. [rep. of 1920 Edn.] (NYThe Modern Library 192[?]),xli, [1], 278pp., 17cm.
  • Do. [Muses’ Library] (Harvard UP 1969);
  • Do. [Muses’ Library] ([London: 1972);
  • Do., as Collected Poems [rep. edn.], with a new introduction by Tom Paulin (London: Routledge 2002), xliii, 256pp. [21 cm].
See citation in A Blake Bibliography by G. E. Bentley & Martin K. Nurmi (Minnesota 1964) - as infra.

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The Works of William Blake (London: Bernard Quaritch 1893): annotations in Yeats’s hand dated 1900 in the flyleaf give information about the preparation of the book and the parts played by Yeats and Ellis (“The writing of this book ...”). A PS to this reads: ‘The Works is full of misprints. There is a good deal here & there in the biography etc with which I am not in agreement. I think that some of my own constructive symbolism is put with too much confidence. It is mainly right [this] part[s] should be used rather as an interpretative hypothesis than as a certainty. The circulation of the Zoas, which seems to me unlike anything in traditional symbolism, is the chief cause of uncertainty, but most that I have written on the subject is at least part of Blake’s plan. There is also uncertainty about the personages who are mentioned by him too seldom to make one know them perfectly; [v] him [v.] their characters. / WBY May. 1900 [n.d.]

Note: Yeats wrote a marginal note in his own library copy of The Works of William Blake, 3 vols. (Bernard Quaritch 1893), which he edited with Ellis: ‘my authority for Blake’s Irish extraction was R. Carter Blake who claims to be descended from a branch of that family that settled in Malaga and entered the arms [?] trade there. WBY’. The note has been transcribed by Edward O’Shea in his Descriptive Catalogue of W. B. Yeats’s Library (Garland 1985). The library is held in the National Library of Ireland. (See Edward O’Shea, A Descriptive Catalog of the Library of W. B. Yeats, Garland 1985, p. 34; item 220 [Wade 218].)

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The Cutting of the Agate (NY: Macmillan 1912)
CONTENTS [with page links to the Gutenberg Project Text Edition - available online]
    page
Thoughts on Lady Gregory’s Translations
  I. Cuchulain and his Cycle 1
  II. Fion and his Cycle 12
Preface to the First Edition of the Well of the Saints 36
Discoveries
  Prophet, Priest and King 49
  Personality and the Intellectual Essences 56
  The Musician and the Orator 61
  A Guitar Player 63
  The Looking-glass 65
  The Tree of Life 67
  The Praise of Old Wives’ Tales 71
  The Play of Modern Manners 73
  Has the Drama of Contemporary Life a Root of its Own? 76
  Why the Blind Man in Ancient Times was made a Poet 79
  Concerning Saints and Artists 85
  The Subject Matter of Drama 89
  The Two Kinds of Asceticism 94
  In the Serpent’s Mouth 97
  The Black and the White Arrows 99
  His Mistress’s Eyebrows 100
  The Tresses of the Hair 103
  A Tower on the Apennines 104
  The Thinking of the Body 106
  Religious Belief Necessary to Religious Art 109
  The Holy Places 113
Poetry and Tradition 116
Preface to the First Edition of John M. Synge’s Poems and Translations 139
J. M. Synge and the Ireland of his Time 146
The Tragic Theatre 196
John Shawe-Taylor 208
Edmund Spenser 213

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The Macmillan/Scribner Collected Works of W. B. Yeats
William H. O’Donnell, The Collected Edition of the Works of W. B. Yeats, Vol. 6: ‘Prefaces and Introductions: Uncollected Prefaces and Introductions by Yeats to works by other authors and the anthologies edited by Yeats’] (Basingstoke: Macmillan 1988), xxi, 370pp., ill. [4pp. of pls.; 23 cm.] - CONTENTS: Introduction [and headnotes] to Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry; “William Carleton” in Stories from Carleton; Introduction to Representative Irish Tales; Introduction to Irish Fairy Tales; “William Allingham 1824-1889” in The Poets and the Poetry of the Century; “Ellen O’Leary 1831-1889” in The Poets and the Poetry of the Century; preface to The Works of William Blake - Poetic, Symbolic and Critical; introduction to Poems of William Blake; Modern Irish Poetry reprinted from A Book of Irish Verse Selected from Modern Writers; “Lionel Johnson”, “AE”, “Nora Hopper” and “Althea Gyles”, reprinted [from] A Treasury of Irish Poetry in the English Tongue; thoughts on Lady Gregory’s translations prefaces to Cuchulain of Muirthemne and Gods and Fighting Men by Lady Gregory; preface to Love Songs of Connacht Being the Fourth Chapter of the Songs of Connacht [by Douglas Hyde]; untitled introduction to Poetry and Patriotism by Lionel Johnson in Poetry and Ireland: Essays by W. B.Yeats and Lionel Johnson; preface to Deirdre of the Sorrows [by] J. M. Synge; introduction to Selections from the Writings of Lord Dunsany [1912]; preface to The Post Office by Rabindranath Tagore; untitled preface to Shingu Gikyoku Zenshu (collected plays of J. M. Synge); introduction to The Happy Prince and Other Fairy Tales by Oscar Wilde; preface to Early Memories - Some Chapters of Autobiography by J. B.Yeats; preface to An Offering of Swans and Other Poems by Oliver Gogarty; preface to Axel by Jean Marie Matthias Philippe August Count de Villiers de l’Isle-Adam; introduction to The Midnight Court by Brian Merriman; prefatory letter to the Medici Society in Songs of Innocence by William Blake; “What we did or tried to do” - “The Coinage of Saorstat Eireann”; preface to Wild Apples by Oliver Gogarty; “Anglo-Irish Ballads” by F.R. Higgins and W.B.Yeats in Broadsides - a Collection of Old and New Songs; introduction to Selections from the Poems of Dorothy Wellesley; introduction to The Lemon Tree by Margot Ruddock; “Music and Poetry” by W. B. Yeats and Dorothy Wellesley in Broadsides - a Collection of Irish and English Songs.
 
John P. Frayne & Madeleine Marchaterre, eds., The Collected Works of W. B. Yeats, Volume IX: ‘Early Articles and Reviews Uncollected Articles and Reviews Written Between 1886 and 1900’ (NY: Scribner’s & Sons 2004), 672pp. - CONTENTS: 1. ‘The Poetry of Sir Samuel Ferguson - I’, The Irish Fireside, 9 Oct. 1886; 2. ‘The Poetry of Sir Samuel Ferguson - II’, The Dublin University Review, Nov. 1886; 3. ‘The Poetry of R. D. Joyce’, The Irish Fireside, 27 Nov. and 4 December 1886; 4. ‘Clarence Mangan (1803-1849)’, The Irish Fireside, 12 March 1887; 5. A fragment of ‘Finn MacCool’ from The Gael, 23 April 1887; 6. ‘The Celtic Romances in Miss Tynan’s New Book’ (review of Shamrocks), The Gael, 11 June 1887; 7. ‘Miss Tynan’s New Book’ (review of Shamrocks), The Irish Fireside, 9 July 1887; 8. ‘The Prose and Poetry of Wilfred Blunt’ (review of Love Songs of Proteus), United Ireland, 28 Jan. 1888; 9. ‘Irish Fairies, Ghosts, Witches, etc.’, Lucifer, 15 Jan. 1889; 10. ‘Irish Wonders’ (review of D. R. McAnally’s book), The Scots Observer, 30 March 1889; 11. ‘John Todhunter’, The Magazine of Poetry (Buffalo), April 1889 86; 12. ‘William Carleton’ (review of Red-Haired Man’s Wife), The Scots Observer, 19 Oct. 1889; 13. ‘Popular Ballad Poetry of Ireland’, The Leisure Hour, Nov. 1889; 14. ‘Bardic Ireland’ (review of S. Bryant’s Celtic Ireland), The Scots Observer, 4 Jan. 1890; 15. ‘Tales from the Twilight’ (review of Lady Wilde’s Ancient Cures), The Scots Observer, 1 March 1890; 16. ‘Irish Fairies’, The Leisure Hour, Oct. 1890; 17. ‘Irish Folk Tales’ (review of D. Hyde’s Beside the Fire), The National Observer, 28 Feb. 1891; 18. ‘Gypsy Sorcery and Fortune Telling’ (review of G. E. Leland’s book), The National Observer, 18 April 1891; 19. ‘Plays by an Irish Poet’ (review of J. Todhunter’s A Sicilian Idyll), United Ireland, 11 July 1891; 20. ‘Clarence Mangan’s Love Affair’, United Ireland, 22 Aug. 1891; 21. ‘A Reckless Century. Irish Rakes and Duellists’, United Ireland, 12 Sept. 1891; 22. ‘Oscar Wilde’s Last Book’ (review of Lord Arthur Savile’s Crime), United Ireland, 26 Sept. 1891; 23. ‘The Young Ireland League’, United Ireland, 3 Oct. 1891; 24. ‘A Poet We Have Neglected’ (review of W. Allingham’s collected poems), United Ireland, 12 December 1891; 25. ‘Poems by Miss Tynan’ (review of Ballads and Lyrics), Evening Herald (Dublin), 2 Jan. 1892; 26. ‘The New ‘Speranza’ (article on Maud Gonne), United Ireland, 16 Jan. 1892; 27. ‘Dr. Todhunter’s Irish Poems’ (review of The Banshee), United Ireland, 23 Jan. 1892; 28. ‘Clovis Hugues on Ireland’, United Ireland, 30 Jan. 1892; 29. ‘Sight and Song’ (review of M. Field’s book), The Bookman, July 1892; 30. ‘Some New Irish Books’ (review of books by G. Savage-Armstrong, W. Larminie, and R. J. Reilly), United Ireland, 23 July 1892; 31. ‘Dublin Scholasticism and Trinity College’, United Ireland, 30 July 1892; 32. ‘A New Poet’ (review of E. J. Ellis’s Fate in Arcadia),The Bookman, Sept. 1892; 33. ‘“Noetry” and Poetry’ (review of G. Savage-Armstrong’s collected poems), The Bookman, Sept. 1892; 34. ‘Invoking the Irish Fairies’, The Irish Theosophist, Oct. 1892; 35. ‘Hopes and Fears for Irish Literature’, United Ireland, 15 Oct. 1892; 36. ‘The Death of Oenone’ (review of Tennyson’s poems), The Bookman, December 1892; 37. ‘The Vision of MacConglinne’ (review of K. Meyer’s edition), The Bookman, Feb. 1893; 38. ‘The Wandering Jew’ (review of R. Buchanan’s poem), The Bookman, April 1893; 39. ‘A Bundle of Poets’ (review of A. H. Hallam’s poems, etc.), The Speaker, 22 July 1893; 40. ‘The Writings of William Blake’ (review of L. Housman’s selection), The Bookman, Aug. 1893; 41. ‘The Message of the Folk-lorist’ (article, and review of T. F. Dyer’s The Ghost World), The Speaker, 19 Aug. 1893; 42. ‘Two Minor Lyrists’ (review of poems by J. D. Hosken and Fenil Haig [F. M. Ford]), The Speaker, 26 Aug. 1893; 43. ‘Old Gaelic Love Songs’ (review of D. Hyde’s Love Songs of Connacht), The Bookman, Oct. 1893; 44. ‘The Ainu’ (review of B. D. Howard’s Life with Trans-Siberian Savages), The Speaker, 7 Oct. 1893; 45. ‘Reflections and Refractions’ (review of C. Weekes’s poems), The Academy, 4 Nov. 1893; 46. ‘Seen in Three Days’ (review of E. J. Ellis’s poem), The Bookman, Feb. 1894; 47. ‘A Symbolical Drama in Paris’ (review of Villiers de L’Isle-Adam’s Axël), The Bookman, April 1894; 48. ‘The Evangel of Folk-lore’ (review of W. Larminie’s West Irish Folk Tales), The Bookman, June 1894 49. ‘A New Poet’ (review of AE’s Homeward, Songs by the Way), The Bookman, Aug. 1894; 50. ‘Some Irish National Books’ (review of books by M. MacDermott, E. M. Lynch, and C. O’Kelly), The Bookman, Aug. 1894; 51. ‘An Imaged World’ (review of E. Garnett’s prose poems), The Speaker, 8 Sept. 1894; 52. ‘The Stone and the Elixir’ (review of F. E. Garrett’s translation of H. Ibsen’s Brand), The Bookman, Oct. 1894; 53. ‘Battles Long Ago’ (review of S. O’Grady’s The Coming of Cuculain), The Bookman, Feb. 1895; 54. ‘An Excellent Talker’ (review of O. Wilde’s A Woman of No Importance), The Bookman, March 1895; 55. ‘Dublin Mystics’ (review of AE’s Homeward, Songs by the Way, 2nd ed., and J. Eglinton’s Two Essays on the Remnant), The Bookman, May 1895; 56. ‘The Story of Early Gaelic Literature’ (review of D. Hyde’s history), The Bookman, June 1895; 57. ‘Irish National Literature, I: From Callanan to Carleton’, The Bookman, July 1895; 58. ‘The Three Sorrows of Story-telling’ (review of D. Hyde’s translation), The Bookman, July 1895; 59. ‘Irish National Literature, II: Contemporary Prose Writers’, The Bookman, Aug. 1895; 60. ‘That Subtle Shade’ (review of A. Symons’s London Nights), The Bookman, Aug. 1895; 61. ‘Irish National Literature, III: Contemporary Irish Poets’, The Bookman, Sept. 1895; 62. ‘Irish National Literature, IV: A List of the Best Irish Books’, The Bookman, Oct. 1895; 63. ‘The Life of Patrick Sarsfield’ (review of J. Todhunter’s biography), The Bookman, Nov. 1895 64. ‘The Chain of Gold’ (review of S. O’Grady’s book), The Bookman, Nov. 1895; 65. ‘William Carleton’ (review of Carleton’s autobiography), The Bookman, March 1896; 66. ‘William Blake’ (review of R. Garnett’s book), The Bookman, April 1896; 67. ‘An Irish Patriot’ (review of Lady Ferguson’s biography of Sir Samuel Ferguson), The Bookman, May 1896; 68. ‘The New Irish Library’ (review of books by R. A. King, J. F. Taylor, and C. G. Duffy), The Bookman, June 1896; 69. ‘William Carleton’ (review of Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry), The Bookman (New York), Aug. 1896; 70. ‘Greek Folk Poesy’ (review of L. Garnett’s collection), The Bookman, Oct. 1896; 71. ‘The Well at the World’s End’ (review of W. Morris’s romance), The Bookman, Nov. 1896; 72. ‘Miss Fiona Macleod as a Poet’ (review of Macleod’s [William Sharp’s] From the Hills of Dream), The Bookman, December 1896; 73. ‘Young Ireland’ (review of C. G. Duffy’s book), The Bookman, Jan. 1897; 74. ‘Mr. John O’Leary’ (review of O’Leary’s Recollections of Fenians and Fenianism), The Bookman, Feb. 1897; 75. ‘Mr. Arthur Symons’ New Book’ (review of Amoris Victima), The Bookman, April 1897; 76. ‘Miss Fiona Macleod’ (review of Macleod’s [William Sharp’s] Spiritual Tales, Tragic Romances and Barbaric Tales), The Sketch, 28 April 1897; 77. ‘The Treasure of the Humble’ (review of Maeterlinck’s book), The Bookman, July 1897; 78. ‘Mr. Standish O’Grady’s Flight of the Eagle’, The Bookman, Aug. 1897; 79. ‘Bards of the Gael and the Gall’ (review of G. Sigerson’s book), The Illustrated London News, 14 Aug. 1897; 80. ‘Aglavaine and Sélysette’ (review of Maeterlinck’s play), The Bookman, Sept. 1897; 81. ‘The Tribes of Danu’, The New Review, Nov. 1897; 82. ‘Three Irish Poets’ (article on AE, Nora Hopper, and Lionel Johnson), The Irish Homestead, December 1897; 83. ‘The Prisoners of the Gods’, The Nineteenth Century, Jan. 1898; 84. ‘Mr. Lionel Johnson’s Poems’ (review of Ireland, with Other Poems), The Bookman, Feb. 1898; 85. ‘Mr. Rhys’ Welsh Ballads’, The Bookman, April 1898; 86. ‘The Broken Gates of Death’, The Fortnightly Review, April 1898; 87. ‘Le Mouvement Celtique: Fiona Macleod’ (article with a review of The Laughter of Peterkin), L’Irlande Libre, 1 April 1898; 88. ‘AE’s Poems’ (review of The Earth Breath), The Sketch, 6 April 1898; 89. ‘Le Mouvement Celtique: II. M. John O’Leary’, L’Irlande Libre, 1 June 1898; 90. ‘Celtic Beliefs About the Soul’ (review of Meyer’s translation of The Voyage of Bran), The Bookman, Sept. 1898; 91. ‘John Eglinton and Spiritual Art’, The Daily Express (Dublin), 29 Oct. 1898, reprinted in Literary Ideals in Ireland, 1899; 92. ‘A Symbolic Artist and the Coming of Symbolic Art’, The Dome, December 1898; 93. ‘High Crosses of Ireland’, The Daily Express (Dublin), 28 Jan. 1899; 94. ‘Notes on Traditions and Superstitions’, Folk-lore, March 1899; 95. ‘The Irish Literary Theatre’, Literature, 6 May 1899 96. ‘The Dominion of Dreams’ (review of Macleod’s book), The Bookman, July 1899; 97. ‘Ireland Bewitched’, The Contemporary Review, Sept. 1899; 98. ‘The Literary Movement in Ireland’, The North American Review, December 1899, reprinted in Ideals in Ireland, 1901. Copy Texts, Emendations, and Notes; Copy Texts Used in This Edition; Emendations to the Copy Texts; Notes; Index. [See Simon and Schuster Publ. Inc., online; accessed 27.06.2010; or see in table-format > RICORSO Bibliography, “Scholars” > J. P. Frayne, as attached.]


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