William Carleton: Works

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RICORSO Library of Irish Classics
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From Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry (1830, & edns.)*
Introduction (1843 Edn.)
“Ned M’Keown”
“The Three Tasks”
“Shan Fadh’s Wedding”
“Lough Derg Pilgrim”
“The Battle of the Factions”
“The Hedgeschool”
“Wildgoose Lodge”
Novels of William Carleton

*Chiefly taken from Collier’s 3-vol. edition. of the Works (NY 1881) - available at the Gutenberg Project [online] - and here re-formatted for RICORSO. Each stories will appear in a new window. For a full list of works by Carleton available at Gutenberg, with active links, see attached.

See Traits and Stories - Sundry Editions - as attached

See also English Novels 1830-36: A Bibliography of British Fiction (Cardiff) - viz., CARLETON, William, 1830: 37; 1833: 15; 1834: 17, 18 - online.]

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General Listing
Fiction
  • Father Butler [and] The Lough Dearg Pilgrim (Dublin: William Curry 1829), iv, 302pp. [see details];
  • [anon.,] Traits and Stories of The Irish Peasantry, 2 vols. (Dublin: William Curry 1830), xii, 275pp. & 304pp., 12°. [see contents];
  • Popular Tales and Legends of the Irish Peasantry, ed. by Samuel Lover [incls. Carleton’s “Alley Sheridan” [prev. National Magazine, Nov. 1830], and “Laying a Ghost” [prev. in ibid., Jan. 1831];
  • Fardorougha the Miser; or, The Convicts of Lishnamona (Dublin: Curry 1839), x, 468pp. [prev. in Dublin University Magazine, Feb. 1837, IX, 50, p.212ff., to Feb. 1838, XI, 61, p.250ff.];
  • The Fawn of Springvale, The Clarionet, and Other Tales, 3 vols. (Dublin: William Curry 1841), viii, 367pp, 351pp., 328pp. [Vol. 1: Preface, “Jane Sinclair” (prev. in Dublin University Magazine, Sept. 1836, VIII, 45, [p.334ff.] to Dec. 1836, VIII, 48, [pp.702-21]), “Lha Dhu”. Vol. 2: “The Clarionet”, “The Dead Boxer” [prev. in Dublin University Magazine, Dec. 1833, II, 12 p.671ff.]. Vol. 3: “The Misfortunes of Barney Bradley” [prev. in Dublin University Magazine, Jan. 1841, XVII, 97, p.80ff. to May 1841, XVII, 101, pp.585-98.], and “Resurrection of Barney Bradley” [prev. in Dublin University Magazine, Feb. 1834, III, 12, p.177ff.];
  • Art Maguire; or, The Broken Pledge: A Narrative [Parlour Library of Ireland] (Dublin: James Duffy 1845), xi, 252pp.
  • Parra Sastha; or, The History of Paddy-Go-Easy and His Wife Nancy [Parlour Library of Ireland] (Dublin: James Duffy 1845), xvi, 198pp.;
  • Rody the Rover; or, the Ribbonman [Parlour Library of Ireland] (Dublin: James Duffy 1845), iv, 260pp., 12º [called 3rd vol. in the series acc. Preface dated 30 Aug. 1845], and Do. [4th Edn.] (Dublin: James Duffy 1845), vii, 244pp. [COPAC lists as Duffy’s Library of Ireland];
  • Characteristic Sketches of Ireland and the Irish, with S[amuel] Lover & Mrs Hall (Dublin: Hardy & Sons 1845), 288pp. [incls. “The Horse Stealers” [prev. in Traits ... &c., 1833]; “Owen McCarthy” [prev. as “The Landlord and the Tenant”, in National Magazine, April 1831]; “Squire Warnock” [prev. as “Laying the Ghost”, in Pop. Tales, 1834]; “The Abduction” (as “Alley Sheridan”, in Popular Tales); “Sir Turlough” [poem; prev. in National Magazine, Nov. 1830];
  • Tales and Sketches illustrating the Character, Usages, Traditions, Sports and Pastimes of the Irish Peasantry [later issued as Tales and Stories of the Irish Peasantry ] (Dublin: James Duffy 1845), ix, 393pp. [see details];
  • Valentine McClutchy, The Irish Agent, or Chronicles of Castle Cumber Property, 3 vols. (Dublin: James Duffy 1845), xii, 300, 318, & 336pp., with plates by Phiz;
  • The Black Prophet: A Tale of Irish Famine [The Parlour Library, No. 1] (London & Belfast: Simms & McIntyre 1847), xi, 455pp. [see details].
  • The Emigrants of Ahadarra, A Tale of Irish Life (London & Belfast: Simms & McIntyre 1848), vii, 309pp.
  • The Tithe Proctor, A Novel, Being a Tale of the Tithe Rebellion in Ireland (London: Simms & McIntyre 1848), xvi, 288pp. [pub. with The Hand and Word by Gerald Griffin];
  • Red Hall; or, The Baronet’s Daughter, 3 vols. (London: Saunders & Otley, 1852), and Do., 3 vols. in 1 (London: Saunders & Otley 1854), 308, 316, 319pp., 12°[/19.8cm. [reiss. as The Black Baronet, Duffy 1856 - as infra];
  • The Squanders of Castle Squander, 2 vols. (London: Illustrated London Library, 1852), ill. [10 pls. being wood-engravings by Wm. Meason & T. Williams after Francis William Topham], [8°/19.6cm]; Do. [another edn.] ( London: Henry Lea, [1860?]), iv., 414pp. [BL copy inscribed Olivia J. Power, Woodlands, April 1860]; Do. [another edn.] (London 1857) [copy in Oxford UL], and Do. [another edn.] (London: Ward, Lock & Tyler [1876]), 414pp.;
  • Willie Reilly and His Dear Coleen Bawn: A Tale Founded upon Fact, 3 vols. (London: Hope & Co. 1855) [orth. title sic; prev. in the Independent, London, Dec. 1850-Jan 1851; see editions, infra];
  • The Silver Acre and Other Tales (London: Ward, Lock & Co. 1862), 238pp., 8° [short fiction from the 1850s];
  • The Black Baronet, or the Chronicles of Ballytrain (Dublin: James Duffy 1857) [reiss. of Red Hall, or The Baronet’s Daughter, 1852];
  • The Evil Eye; or, The Black Spectre - A Romance (Dublin: James Duffy 1860), viii, 517pp., ill. [13 woodcuts from drawings by Edmund Fitzpatrick], 8º. [add. t.p., with woodcut], and Do. [another edn.] (Duffy 1864) [TCD Lib & Nat. Lib. of Scotland]; Do. [another edn.] (London: George Routledge and Sons 1896), 192pp. [author’s copyright edn.;incls. pref. to first & second edns.; printed in double-columns, with colour plate front., half-title, and title-page.]
  • The Double Prophecy; or, Trials of the Heart (Dublin: James Duffy 1862) [prev. in Duffy’s Hibernian Magazine];
  • Redmond Count O’Hanlon, the Irish Rapparee (Dublin: James Duffy 1862; rep. 1886);
  • The Poor Scholar, Frank Martin and the Fairies, the Country Dancing Master, and Other Irish Tales (Dublin: James Duffy [1869]), 252pp., 15cm. [see details]; Do., as Dominick: The Poor Scholar, by William Carleton [Carleton’s Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry, Pt. 9 (London: Ward, Lock & Co. [1881]), [91]pp., ill. [22cm]; and Do. as The Poor Scholar (Dublin: Wm. Dawson & Sons Ltd. [1930]), [4], 167, [5]pp. [18.3cm].
  • Tubber Derg, or The Red Well; Party Fight and Funeral; Dandy Kehoe’s Christening, and Other Irish Tales (Dublin: James Duffy 1869), 256pp., 16cm. [see details];
  • Neal Malone, and Tubber Derg [Carleton’s Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry], 10 (London: Ward, Lock & Co. [1881]), [70]pp., ill., 22 cm.
  • The Red-haired Man’s Wife (Dublin Sealy [&c.]; London: Simpkin 1889);

Also: ‘The Late John Banim’, in The Nation, 23 Sept. 1843, pp.794-95 [see Banim > Commentary > Carleton, supra.]

 
Works published by James Duffy (Dublin)*
  • Art Maguire; or, The Broken Pledge: A Narrative [Parlour Library, No. 1] (Dublin: James Duffy 1845), xi, 252pp.
  • Parra Sastha; or, The History of Paddy-Go-Easy and His Wife Nancy [Parlour Library, No. 2] (Dublin: James Duffy 1845), xvi, 198pp.;
  • Rody the Rover; or, the Ribbonman [Parlour Library, No. 1] (Dublin: James Duffy 1845), iv, 260pp., 12º [called 3rd vol. in the [Parlour] series in the Preface, dated 30 Aug. 1845]; Do. [4th Edn.] (Duffy 1845), vii, 244pp.;
  • Tales and Sketches illustrating the Character, Usages, Traditions, Sports and Pastimes of the Irish Peasantry (Dublin: Duffy 1845), ix, 393pp. [later issued as Tales and Stories of the Irish Peasantry] - see details;
  • Valentine McClutchy, The Irish Agent, or Chronicles of Castle Cumber Property, 3 vols. (Dublin: Duffy 1845), xii, 300, 318, & 336pp., ill. [with plates by Phiz];
  • The Black Baronet, or the Chronicles of Ballytrain (Dublin: Duffy 1856 [1857]) [reiss. of Red Hall; or, The Baronet’s Daughter, 1852];
  • The Evil Eye, or The Black Spectre (Dublin: Duffy 1860);
  • The Double Prophecy, or Trials of the Heart, 2 vols. (Dublin 1862), rep. from Irish American (NY), and Duffy’s Hibernian Magazine;
  • Redmond Count O’Hanlon, the Irish Rapparee (Dublin: James Duffy 1862; rep. 1886);
  • Tubber Derg, or, The Red Well: Party Fight and funeral, Dandy Kehoe’s Christening, and Other Irish Tales (Dublin: Duffy n.d.), 256pp. [Cathach 1996-97].
  • The Poor Scholar, Frank Martin and the Fairies, the Country Dancing Master, and Other Irish Tales (Dublin: James Duffy [1869]), 252pp., 15cm. [Contains “The Poor Scholar”; “Mickey M’Rorey, the Irish Fiddler”; “Buckram Back, the Country Dancing Master”; “Mary Murray, the Irish Match Maker”; “Bob Pentland, or the Gauger Outwitted”; “The fate of Frank M’Kenna”; “The Rival Kempers”; “Frank Martin and the Fairies”; “A Legend of Knockmany”.
*The listing given here is compiled from RICORSO records based on COPAC.
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Poetry
  • “Retrospections”, signed “Wilton”, in Christian Examiner (Sept. 1828);
  • “Willy Reilly”, in Ballad Poetry of Ireland, ed. Charles Gavan Duffy (Dublin: The Nation 1845);
  • “Farewell”, in The Nation (18 Dec. 1858);
    [… et. al.]
Drama
  • Irish Manufacture, or Bob McGawley’s Project (Theatre Royal, 25 March 1841), of which the prologue only was printed, in The Warder (April 3 1841).
Autobiography (editions)
  • David J. O’Donoghue, The Life of William Carleton: being his autobiography and letters [...], completed by David O’Donoghue, intro. by Mrs Cashel Hoey, 2 vols. (London: Downey & Co. 1896) [i.e., Vol. I: Carleton’s autobiography to 1828; Vol. 2: biography by O’Donoghue] [see details];
  • The Life of William Carleton [...], completed by David O’Donoghue [... &c.] [Ireland, from the Act of Union, 1800, to the death of Parnell, 1891, No. 44; facs. of 1896 1st Edn.], 2 vols. (NY: Garland Publishing Co. 1979) [same pag. as 1896],
  • The Autobiography of William Carleton, with a preface by Patrick Kavanagh [Fitzroy Editions] (London: MacGibbon & Kee 1968), 238pp., port.
  • The Autobiograpy of William Carleton [first pub. as The Life of William Carleton, 1896, Vol. 1], with a foreword by Benedict Kiely (Belfast: White Row Press 1996), 248pp. [details.]
 
Sundry reprints
Ireland Since Parnell, ed. Robert Lee Wolff - Garland Facsimile Ser.
  • The Black Prophet: A Tale of the Irish Famine [facs. of 1847 edn.] (NY: Garland Publ. 1979);
  • Father Butler [and] The Lough Dearg Pilgrim: Being Sketches of Irish Manners [facs. of 1829 edn.] (NY: Garland Publ. 1979);
  • Tales of Ireland [fac. of 1834 edn.] (NY: Garland 1979);
  • Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry [facs. rep.] (NY: Garland 1979);
  • Valentine McClutchy, The Irish Agent (NY: Garland, 1979), xii, 468pp.
Trashface (Dublin)
  • An Essay on Irish Swearing [rep.] (Dublin: Trashface [2008]), 53pp. [Bibl. note pp51-53; orig. in Traits and Stories of the Irish peasantry, Ser. 2, Vol. 1 (Dublin: Wakeman 1833) [later incorporated into “The Geography of an Irish Oath”.
The Echo Library
  • Willy Reilly (Teddington 2007)
Song
  • Willy Reilly, and his dear Cooleen Bawn. - The Dear Irish Maid.-The Extermination ballad.- Rocking the Cradle. - The Bargee Heroes [all songs] (Dublin [1865]) [copy held in British Museum].

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Bibliographical details
Father Butler
[and] The Lough Dearg Pilgrim (Dublin: William Curry 1829), iv, 302pp. [the latter pp.201-320 - prev. pub. in Christian Examiner as “A Pilgrimage to Patrick’s Purgatory”, April-May 1828 [with Intro., pp.268-69 - omitted from reps.]; Do. [2nd edn.] (Dublin: William Curry Jun. and Company, 8 Upper Sackville-street. MDCCCXXXIX [1839]), 229pp., ill. Brooke [in which “Fr. Butler”, pp.1-152, and “Lough Derg Pilgrim”, pp.153-299; printed Dublin: John S. Folds, 5 Bachelors Walk] - available at Google Books - online [accessed 24.11.2011].

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Synopsis

Traits and Stories … &c. [var. early editions]
Traits and Stories (Dublin: Curry 1830) [1st Series] details
Traits and Stories (Dublin: Wakeman 1833) [2nd Series) details
Traits and Stories (Dublin: Wakeman 1836) [4th edn.] details
Traits and Stories (Dublin: Curry; London: Orr 1843-44) [def. edn.] details
   
Sundry later editions
Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry (London: Routledge 1852) details
Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry (Dublin & London 1862) details
Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry (London: 1853, 1881) details
Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry (NY: P. J. Collier 1881) details
Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry (London: [1871]) details
Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry ed. M. Harmon (1973) [discont.] details
Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry, ed. Barbara Hayley, 2 vols. (1979) details
Note the 1836 edition of the two series published jointly in 5 vols. is not yet listed here [15.10.2010]. For an Outline Bibliography of the chief editions of the Traits and Stories - see attached.
Other collections & editions
Tales of Ireland (1834) details
Tales and Sketches ... (1845) details
The Irishman at Home (1849) details
Irish Life and Character ([1860]) details
Amusing Irish Tales (1889) details
Carleton’s Stories of Irish Life (1918) details
Collected Works
The Works of William Carleton (New York 1881) details
Autobiography
The Life of William Carleton, 2 vols. (1896) details
The Autobiography of William Carleton (1996 Edn.) details


A National Treasure: Signed copy of Traits & Stories (1843) presented to Mrs. James Duffy

Binding

Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry, 2 vols. (Dublin: Curry MDCLXLIII [1843]), in raised green Morocco with Irish ornamentation and gilding, signed by author, ‘21 Aug. 1844’ and ded. ‘To Mrs. James Duffy as a mark of respect from the author / W’Carleton / Fond present - August 21st 1844’ is held in private library of Herbert Bell, Esq., Belfast. [Cell phone photo by BS.]

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Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry

Contemporary editions

  • Traits and Stories (Dublin: Curry 1830) [1st Series; see details];
    Traits and Stories (Dublin: Wakeman 1833) [2nd Series; see details];
  • Traits and Stories (Dublin: Wakeman 1836) [4th edn.; see details];
  • Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry, 5 vols. (London: Baldwin & Craddock 1836);
  • Traits and Stories of The Irish Peasantry: A New Edition (Dublin; Curry; London: Orr 1843-44) [called definitive; published from same sheets as the same sold separately by month in 23 parts, 1842-44];

Later editions

  • Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry / A New Edition [i.e., edn. of 1843-44] (London: George Routledge & Co. 1852) [see details], and Do. (1853, 1854, 4th edn.; 1856, [5th edn.- see details]; 1862 [see details]);
  • Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry, ed. D. J. O’Donoghue, 4 vols. (London: Dent 1896);
  • Carleton’s Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry (London: Ward, Lock & Co. 1856; rep. [1881]) [see details];
  • Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry (London: [1871]) [see details]
  • Carleton’s Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry (London: Ward, Lock & Co. [1881]) [see details]
  • “Traits and Stories of The Irish Peasantry”, in The Works of William Carleton [3 vols.] (NY: P. F. Collier Publ. 1881) [see details].
  • Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry ed. M. Harmon (1973) [series discontinued; see details.]
  • Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry, ed. Barbara Hayley, 2 vols. (1979) [see details]
Modern editions
  • Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry, ed. & intro. by Anthony Cronin [as] The Courtship of Phelim O’Toole: Six Irish Tales [from Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry] (1962);
  • Robert Lee Wolff, ed., Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry [facs. rep.], 2 vols. (NY: Garland 1979);
  • Maurice Harmon, ed. & intro., Wildgoose Lodge and Other Stories (Cork: Mercier Press 1973), 119pp. [being Vol. 1 of discontinued series; see other volumes, infra];
Standard Edition
  • Barbara Hayley, ed., & intro., Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry, Vols. I & II [facs. rep. of 1843-44 edn.] (Gerrards Cross: Colin Smythe 1990), 427pp. [Vol. II is available at Google Books - online.]

See also Tess Hurson, ed., Inside the Margins: A Carleton Reader (Belfast: Lagan Press 1992), 207pp.

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  • [...]
 

 

 

 

 

See also Barbara Hayley, Carleton’s Traits and Stories and the Nineteenth-Century Anglo-Irish Tradition (Gerrards Cross: Colin Smythe 1983), xiv, 432pp. - or view the Outline Chronology of Traits and Stories edns. derived from same, attached];

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Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry [anon.], with Etchings by W. H. Brooke, Esq., in Two Volumes [2 vols.; later to be known as Series 1] (Dublin: William Curry, Jun. and Company, 9, Upper Sackville Street, 1830), xii, 275pp. & 304pp., 12°.
Contents
Vol. 1: List of Contents, p.[v]) - followed by a Preface dated ‘Dublin, 1st March, 1830’, pp.[vii]–xii; .“Ned M’Keown”, pp.[1]–42;“The Three Tasks, or the Little House under the Hill”, pp.[43]–92; “An Irish Wedding”, pp.[93]-156; “Larry M’Farland’s Wake”, pp.[157]-216; “The Battle of the Factions. By a Hedge Schoolmaster”, pp.[217]-275.
Vol. 2: “Funeral, and Party Fight”, pp.[1]-108; “The Hedge School”, pp.[109]-210; “The Station”, pp.[211]–304 [prev. in Christian Examiner, Jan.-April-June 1829]. Printer’s mark in Vol. I reads: ‘Dublin: Printed by P. D. Hardy, Cecilia Street’.

Preface: ‘[…] The reader may finally believe that these volumes contain probably a greater number of facts than any other book ever published on Irish life’ (p.xi.) Carleton affirms that he ‘has studiously avoided local idiom, and that intolerable Scoto-Hibernic jargon which pierces the ear so unmercifully - but has preserved every thing Irish, and generalized the phraseology, so that the book, wherever it may go, will exhibit a truly Hibernian spirit’ (p.xi).

 

Note: COPAC also lists Traits and stories of the Irish peasantry / [By William Carleton] With etchings by W.H. Brooke ... In two volumes ... (Dublin: William Curry, Jun. and Company ... 1830), 2 vols. in 1, pls, 17.2cm. [sole copy in TCD Lib.], and Do. 2nd edn. (Dublin: Curry [... &c.] 1832), viii, 567pp., pls., 16 cm. [QUB Lib.]

 

Second and further series

Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry. Second Series. In Three Volumes. [3 vols.] (Dublin: William Frederick Wakeman. Sold in London, by W. Simpkin and R. Marshall, and by R. Groomsbridge, 6, Panyer-Alley, Paternoster-Row, 1833); Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry [2nd edn.] (1834); Do., [3rd edn.] (1835); Do. [1st American edn.] (Philadelphia & Baltimore 1833); Do. [collected with 1st ser.] (London & Dublin 1836); Do. [definitive edn.] (Dublin & London 1843–44); Do. (London 1852); Do. (London 1853); Do. (London 1853–55) - and at least 6 more edns. to 1870. French trans. of “Wildgoose Lodge”, in Romans irlandais: scenes de la vie champêtre (1861). Germans trans. as Skizzen Erzählungen aus dem Leben des Irishen Landvolks (1837).

 
—See English Novels 1830-36: A Bibliography of British Fiction (Cardiff) - online.]

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Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry. Second Series. In Three Volumes. [3 vols.] (Dublin: William Frederick Wakeman. Sold in London, by W. Simpkin and R. Marshall, and by R. Groomsbridge, 6, Panyer-Alley, Paternoster-Row, 1833), with ... etchings, and engravings on wood, by W. H. Brooke Vol. I [anon.], viii, 471pp.; Vol. II: 475p; Vol. III: 448p., 12° boards [31s. 6d.; var. 15s.]; Vol. 1, p.[iii], and Preface, pp.[v]–viii; Lists of contents (1p.) precede main text in Vols. 2 & 3. [First noticed Dec 1832; copies held in 7 libraries; Magazine notices from April 1830.]

CONTENTS [1833]: Vol. 1: “The Midnight Mass”, pp.[1]–150; “The Donagh; or, the Horse Stealers”, pp.[151]–208 [prev. in the National Magazine, Dec. 1830]; “Phil Purcel, the Pig-Driver. An Outline”, pp.[209]–264; “An Essay on Irish Swearing”, pp.[265]–306 [later incorp. with seq.]; “The Geography of an Irish Oath”, pp.[307]–471. Vol. 2: “The Lianhan Shee, an Irish Superstition”, pp.[1]–55 [prev. in Christian Examiner, Nov. 1830]; “The Poor Scholar”, pp.[57]–298; “Wildgoose Lodge”, pp.[299]–336; “Tubber Derg; or, the Red Well”, pp.[337]–475. Vol. 3: “Denis O’Shaughnessy Going to Maynooth”, pp.[1]–254 [prev. in Christian Examiner (Sept.-Dec. 1831)]; “Phelim O’Toole’s Courtship”, pp.[255]–433; “Notes” pp.[435]–488. Also, a list of works ‘Lately Published, by William Frederick Wakeman, 9, D’Olier-Street, Dublin’ (4pp.). Printer’s marks in Vols. 2 and 3 read: ‘Dublin: Printed by P. Dixon Hardy, Cecilia-Street’.

Note - COPAC also lists edn. of 1834: Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry. Second series. 2nd edn. (Dublin William Frederic Wakeman 1834), 3 vols. [ fronts., ills., pls.; 16 cm. CONTENTS: Vol. 1: The Midnight Mass. The Donagh; or, The Horse-stealers. Phil Purcell, the Pig-driver. The Geography of an Irish Oath. An Essay on Irish Swearing. Vol. 2: The Lianhan Shee. The Poor Scholar. Wildgoose Lodge. Tubber Derg; or, The Red Well.-v. 3. Denis O'Shaughnessy going to Maynooth. Phelim O'Toole's Courtship. [Copies in Cambridge UL and QUB Lib.]

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Traits and stories of the Irish peasantry ... [Third edn., corr.; i.e., Second series; 3 vols. in 2] (Dublin: William Frederick Wakeman; sold in London by W. Simpkin and R. Marshall, and by R. Groombridge 6 Panyer-Alley, Paternoster Row, 1833), viii, 471, 475, 448pp., 8°. [Available at Google Books online - copy in Oxford UL; last accessed 05.11.2011; another copy at Princeton UL at Google Books online]; note orth. Phil Purcell [sic].

Preface: ‘It is to be wished that Prefaces were abolished. There is something peculiarly Irish about them. An author writes a book, and proceeds from story to story and from incident to incident, as the case may be, and imagines, when he has concluded, that the work is finished. He never was more mistaken in his life: for, at the moment when he fancies that the labour over, comes the Bookseller to remind him of the Preface. He is accordingly compelled to resume his pen and end his book at the beginning.
 With respect to the contents of this Second Series, the Author has only to observe, that the volumes constituting the First Series had an excellent sale, considering that they were of Irish manufacture. They are now getting into a third edition, and much of their success may probably be ascribed to the fact of their never having been puffed; for no man excites more notice than he who runs counter to the fashion’ (p.[v]).
[...]
‘This Preface, like every other human work, expect the improvement of Ireland, must come to a close. It was written on compulsion: it was to have been serious - it was to have given a touching dissertation upon Irish character - it was to have been elaborate philosophical, and what not - all within the compass of four pages! [p.vvi]
[...]
‘When this work was nearly ready for publication, a calamitous fire reduced the printer’s establishment to ashes. The Traits and Stories unhappily shared the same fate: the first edition went off brilliantly in the course of one night. Had the book appeared as it was then printed, it would have rivalled any thing coming from the first houses of London. It was again put through the press in a hurry, and under circumstances highly disadvantageous; and yet its typographical execution is certainly creditable to the country.’ (pp.vii–viii). [Available at Google Books - online.]

Note - COPAC also lists 3rd edn. as Traits and stories of the Irish peasantry / [by William Carleton.] With ... etchings, and engravings on wood, by W.H. Brooke. Third edn., corr. (Dublin, 1834), 2 vols.; 8°.

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Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry / by William Carleton; with illustrations by W. H. Brooke, Esq., A.R.H.A. [Fourth edition], 5 vols. (Dublin: William F. Wakeman; London: Baldwin and Cradock; 1836), Vol. I: viii, 339pp.; Vol. II: 371pp.; Vol. III: x, 364pp.; Vol. 4: 375pp.; Vol. IV: 342pp., ill., front. port. engr. by J. W. Cook [Vol. I], 16cm [8vo]; printed by W. Clowes and Sons. Illustrations: Vol. I: 2 plates; Vol. II: 5 plates; Vol. III: 7 plates; Vol. IV: 4 plates; Vol. V: 7 plates [all by W. H. Brooke, 1772-1860]. Includes preface to the first edition dated 1830. Note that Wm. Clowes & Son also printed the Tegg Edition of 1865, &c., as infra. Copies of all 5 vols. are held in Sheffield UL, Univ. College, London, and the National Trust. Parts only of the edition are found in Cambridge UL and Manchester UL holds a 3 vols. edition None is listed for TCD Lib. in COPAC.

CONTENTS [1836]: Vol. I: Preface to the First Edition of 1830 [viiipp.]; “Ned M’Keown”; “The Three Tasks, or The Little House under the Hill”; “Shane Fadh’s wedding”; “Larry M’Farland’s Wake”; “Battle of the Factions. Vol. II: The Party Fight and Funeral”; “The Hedge School, and the Abduction of Mat Kavanagh”; “The Station. Vol. III: The Midnight Mass”; “The Donagh, or The Horse Stealers”; “Phil Purcell, the Pig-driver”; “The Geography of an Irish Oath”; “An Essay on Irish Swearing [here sep. but later conjoined]. Vol. IV: The Lianhan Shee”; “An Irish Superstition”; “The Poor Scholar”; “Wildgoose Lodge”; “The Red Well. Vol. V: Denis O’Shaughnessy Going to Maynooth”; “Phelim O’Toole’s Courtship”.

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Traits & Stories of the Irish Peasantry, By William Carleton. With an Autobiographical Introduction, Illustrative Notes and Graphic Illustrations on Wood and Steel, 2 vols. (William Curry, Jun., and Co., Dublin; and William S. Orr and Co., London, MDCCCXLIII [1843 & 1844]), ill. [by Phiz, [Henry] MacManus [“Carleton’s Birthplace”], and Franklin, xxiv, 427, 430pp., 8°/ 23cm [signed port. of Carleton in chair with book and dog - in pencil by C. Grey, 29 Jany. 1843 [engrav.]; with add. litho. t.p. to each vol.].

CONTENTS - Vol. 1: ‘General Introduction’ [i.e., autobiographical introduction.]; Ned M’Keown; The Three Tasks; Shane Fadh’s Wedding; Larry McFarland’s Wake; The Battle of the Factions; The Station; The Party Fight and Funeral; The Lough Derg Pilgrim; The Hedge School; The Midnight Mass; The Donagh; or, The Horse Stealers; Phil Purcel the Pig-driver. Vol. II - Geography of an Irish Oath; The Lianhan Shee; Going to Maynooth; Phelim O’Toole’s Courtship The Poor Scholar; Wildgoose Lodge; Tubber Derg; or, The Red Well; Neal Malone. [See prime copy in Library of Herbert Bell, Belfast; same in cloth, Cathach 1996-76; £120 - actually a rep. of the definitive 1843-44 Edn.]

Traits and Stories of The Irish Peasantry / by / William Carleton. / A New Edition / with an autobiographical introduction, explanatory notes, and numerous illustrations on wood and steel, by Harvey, Phiz, Franklin, Macmanus, Gilbert, and other Artists of Eminence. (WILLIAM CURRY, JUN., and Co., DUBLIN, and WILLIAM S. ORR AND Co., LONDON. MDCCCXLIII [1843]), Vol. I, xxiv, 427pp.; ill. [22 wood and steel pls.]; Vol. II, Do., 1-430pp.; 15 more pls., including as the first “Prillusk”, the author’s birthplace.

CONTENTS: Vol. I - General Introduction; Ned M’Keown; The Three Tasks; Shane Fadh’s Wedding; Larry McFarland’s Wake; The Battle of the Factions; The Station; The Party Fight and Funeral; The Lough Derg Pilgrim; The Hedge School; The Midnight Mass; The Donagh; or, The Horse Stealers; Phil Purcel the Pig-driver. Vol. II - Geography of an Irish Oath; The Lianhan Shee; Going to Maynooth; Phelim O’Toole’s Courtship The Poor Scholar; Wildgoose Lodge; Tubber Derg; or, The Red Well; Neal Malone. [See prime copy in Library of Herbert Bell, Belfast; same in cloth, Cathach 1996-76; £120 - actually a reprint of the definitive 1843-44 Edn.]

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Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry, a new edition, with autbiographical introduction, explanatory notes, and numerous illustrations on wood and steel, by Harvey, Phiz, Franklin, Macmanus, Gilbert, and other Artists of Eminence, 2 vols. (London: George Routledge & Co., Farringdon Street 1852), 23cm. [reps. engraved t.p. of Curry/Orr edition of 1843-44; ded. to Isaac Butt, LLD, MRIA, Barrister at Law, and one of the Aldermen of the City of Dublin - short leetter ded.: ‘My dear Butt ...’] - available at Google Books online - Oxford UL copy; formerly property of James Coutts Maxwell [Univ. Reader; d.1976]; & Do. [New edition; Routledge’s new series] (London: Geo. Routledge 1853), 371pp., ill. [front.], 18cm. [with an additional titlepage dated 1855] Contents as in 1843 Edn. - supra.

Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry, 2 vols. in 1 [whole ser. of 10 iss.] (London: Ward, Lock & Co., [1853]), and Do. [in 12 vols.] Vol. 1: 399pp.; Vol. 2: 381pp., with pref. to ‘the new edition of all my works’, ded. to Isaac Butt [being a rep. of the 1843 edn. [see also the Ward & Lock London edition of 1881 - as infra.]

Traits and stories of the Irish peasantry. By William Carleton: With an autobiographical introduction, explanatory notes, and numerous illustrations ... Fifth edition, complete in one volume (London: George Routledge & Co. 1856), [8], xxiv, 427, [1]; [4], 430p., ill. [pls., port.], 8°. [Copy at National Trust.]

Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry (London: Maxwell [n.d.]), ill. Daniel Maclise, 1 vol., 780pp., additionally incls. the following stories: “The Silver Acre” (Illustrated London Magazine, 1853); “The Fair Emyvale” (Illustrated London Magazine, 1853); “Master and Scholar” (Illustrated London Magazine, 1853).

Traits and Stories of the Irish peasantry / by William Carleton; with an autobiographical introduction, explanatory notes, and numerous illustrations on wood and steel, by Harvey, Phiz, Franklin, Macmanus, Gilbert, and other artists of eminence. [4th Edn.] (London: George Routledge & Co. 1854), [23cm; added t.p.’s engraved]. CONTENTS: Vol. I. Ned M’Keown. The three tasks. Shane Fadh’s wedding. Larry M’Farland’s wake. The battle of the factions. The station. The party fight and funeral. The Lough Derg pilgrim. The hedge school. The midnight mass. The Donagh; or, The horse-stealers. Phil Purcel, the pig driver. Vol. II: Geography of an Irish oath. The Lianhan Shee. Going to Maynooth. Phelim O’Toole’s courtship. The poor scholar. Wildgoose lodge. Tubber Derg; or, The Red Well. Neal Malone.

Traits and stories of the Irish peasantry / and Do. [5th Edn.] (London: G. Routledge 1856) [incls. autobiographical introduction].

Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry [...] / with the author’s last corrections, an introduction, explanatory notes, and numerous illustrations, by Harvey, Phiz, Franklin, Macmanus, Gilbert etc. complete edition], 2 vols. [5th Edn.] (London: W. Tegg 1864); Do. [6th Edn.] (London: Tegg 1865); Do. [7th Edn.] (London: Tegg 1867); Do. [8th Edn.] (London: Tegg 1868); Do. [9th complete edition], 2 vols. (London: W. Tegg 1869), ill. [fronts., pls.; 22 cm.]

CONTENTS: Vol. I: Ned M’Keown. The Three Tasks. Shane Fadh’s Wedding. Larry M’Farland’s Wake. The Battle of the Factions. The Station. The Party Fight and Funeral. The Lough Derg Pilgrim. The Hedge School. The Midnight Mass. The Donagh; or, The Horse-stealers. Phil Purcel, the Pig-driver. Vol. -II: Geography of an Irish Oath. The Lianhan Shee. Going to Maynooth. Phelim O’Toole’s Courtship. The Poor Scholar. Wildgoose lodge. Tubber Derg; or, The Red Well. Neal Malone. [See details of Vol. II, seq.]

Notes: “Neal Malone” [orig. printed in Dublin University Review & Quarterly, Jan. 1833, and next in Tales of Ireland (1834), and “Lough Derg Pilgrim” [pp.236-70]. Note: This edition and its successive imprints is considered the definitive text as being the last that Carleton touched and is substantially the same as its successors in 1853, 1862, &c. Variations in the American editions published by Collier in 1881 chiefly concern American orthography and suitable differences in the treatment of notes to the text. [See espec. Curry rep. of 1862, infra.]

Traits and Stories / of / The Irish Peasantry / by / William Carleton. / Tenth Complete Edition / With the Author’s Last Corrections, an Introduction, Explanatory notes, / and / numerous illustrations, / by Harvey, Gilbert, Phiz, Franklin, MacManus, &c. / Vol. II. London: William Tegg. [n.d.; 1871?] 430pp. [t.p. verso:] Printed by William Clowes and Sons, Stamford Street / and Charing Cross.

CONTENTS [Vol. II:] Geography of an Irish Oath [1]; The Lianhan Shee [75]; Going to Maynooth [97]; Phelim O’ Toole’s Courtship [188]; The Poor Scholar [257]; Wildgoode Lodge [349]; Tubber Derg; or, the Red Well [363]; Neal Malone [415].

Illustrations: “Preparing for Examination” (Wrightson) [4]; “Death of Ellish” (Wrightson) [51]; “You see this little bottle, drink it” (Griffiths) [82]; “I Am - What You Have Made Me” (Griffiths) [92]; Dennis Teaching Morality and Practising Feelosophy’(Phiz) [109]; Dennis Promoted to the Dignity of a House” (Phiz) [111]; “If You Don’t Know The Way,” Etc. (Wrightson) [203]; “There Goes The Goold, My Worthy” (Wrightson) [233]; “The Poor Scholar Sick of the Faver” (Wrightson) [301]; “The Poor Scholar’s Return” (Wrightson) [347]; “Enchanted Soldiers in the Rath” (Phiz) [387]; “The First Alms-Begging (Phiz)” [389]; “By All That’s Sacred An’ Holy We’re Willin’” (Phiz) [354]; “Mrs. Malone Taking Neal to Bed” (Phiz) [425].

Note: The 9th Complete edition, published by Tegg, is dated 1869 [COPAC]. A copy of the 10th edition in the Harvard Library, undated but bearing the inscription ‘1871, July 1 / Shapleigh Fund’, is available in .pdf digital from in Google Books online; accessed 28.06.2010.]

Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry (Toronto: Daily Telegraph 1871); orig. 176pp. [in double columns] [available on microfiche at CIHM/ICMH.]

Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry [new edition] (London: [1872]), and Do. [another edn.?] (1877), 8° [miscalled 2nd series; held in Oxford UL].

Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry, With the author’s last corrections, an introduction, explanatory notes, and numerous illustrations, etc., 2 vols. (London: Ward, Lock & Co. [1881]), 8º, and Do. as 2 vols. in 1 - copy held in Oxford UL listing Pts. 3, 9, 10 - viz.,.

  • The Party Fight and Funeral; and, The Battle of the Factions, by William Carleton, Pt. 3 [of Traits and Stories], (London: Ward, Lock and Co. [1881]), 264pp.;
  • The Midnight Mass; and The Station, Pt. 4 [of Traits and Stories] (London: Ward, Lock and Co. [1881]), 175pp.;
  • Going to Maynooth, Pt. , 7 [] (London: Ward, Lock and Co. [1881]), 187pp., ill. [22cm];
  • Dominick: The Poor Scholar, by William Carleton [Carleton’s Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry, Pt. 9 [of Traits and Stories], (London: Ward, Lock & Co. [1881]), [91]pp., ill. [22cm];
  • Neal Malone; and Tubber Derg, Pt. 10 [of Traits and Stories] (London: Ward, Lock and Co. [1881]), [70]pp., ill., 22 cm.

    Note: It is likely that the sheets of this edition were shared with Collier (NY which corresponds in format to the Ward & Lock edition issued in London in 1856 and again in 1881. A Collier edition of 1856 is occasionally cited in the bibliographical literature and not held in any UK library [i.e., COPAC]. The Collier edition of 1881 was used as copy-text for the Gutenberg digital version (ed. by David Widger). [BS]

Traits and Stories of The Irish Peasantry [in] “The Works of William Carleton” [3 vols.], Vol. 3 (NY: P. F. Collier Publ. 1881), ill. M. L. Flanery. CONTENTS: Introduction; “Ned M’Keown”; “The Three Tasks”; “Shane Fadh’s Wedding”; “Larry M’Farland’s Wake”; “The Battle of the Factions”; “The Station”; “The Party Fight and Funeral”; “The Lough Derg Pilgrim”; “The Hedge School Master”; “The Midnight Mass”; “The Donagh, or the Horse Stealers”; “Phil Purcel, the Pig-Driver”; “The Geography of an Irish Oath”; “The Lianhan Shee”; “Going to Maynooth”; “Phelim O’Toole’s Courtship”; “The Poor Scholar”; “The Black Prophet”; “Wild Goose Lodge”; “Neal Malone”; “Art Maguire”. [This copy at Gutenberg Texts online; see ills. in RICORSO Library, “Illustrations”, infra.] (Note that a Collier edition of 1856 is also cited.)

Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry [Routledge’s Standard Library, 69] [Complete edition] (London & NY: Routledge [1893]), 821pp. [19cm; copies in British Library, et al. loc.].

Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry, ed. by D. J. O’Donoghue [orig. 1830], [4 vols.] (London: J. M. Dent; NY: Macmillan 1896), ill. [incls. “Glossary of Irish phrases”, Vol. 4, pp.327-35].

Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry [Mercier Press 8-vol. edn.; discontinued after 4], ed. & intro. by Maurice Harmon (Cork: Mercier Press 1973). Series contents: Vol. 1: Wildgoose Lodge and Other Stories [see details] ; Vol. 2: Denis O’Shaughnessy Going to Maynooth; Vol. 3: Phelim 0’Toole’s Courtship and Other Stories; Vol. 4: The Party Fight and Funeral. Further vols. planned for the series - Vol 2: Denis O’Shaugnessy Goes to Maynooth, 144pp.; Vol. 3: Phelim O’Toole’s Courtship and Other Stories; Vol. 4: The Party Fight and Funeral; Vol. 5:The Battle of the Factions and Other Stories; Vol. 6: Poor Scholar; Vol. 7: The Station and Other Stories; Vol. 8: Tubber Derg or the Red Well. [Discontinued after 4; no further editions issued; note that the whole series is oddly classed as essay/festschrift in the TCD Lib. Catalogue.]

Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry, ed. & intro. by Maurice Harmon (Cork: Mercier Press 1973), Vol. I: Wildgoose Lodge and Other Stories [Mercier Irish Classics, Vol. 1] (Cork: Mercier Press 1973), 119pp.; styled ‘one of eight vols. containing a complete and unabridged edition of William Carleton’s Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry’. Vol. 1 - “Wildgoose Lodge” [1]; “Ned M’Keown” [21]; “The Lianhan Shee” [50]; “The Lough Derg Pilgrim” [81].

Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry, ed. & intro. by Robert Wolff [Ireland, from the Act of Union, 1800, to the death of Parnell, 1891, 34; facs. edn.] (NY: Garland PUbl. 1979) [facs. of 2 vols., Dublin: W. Curry, 1830].

Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry, with a Foreword by Barbara Hayley [facs. of the 2 vol. 1843-44 edition], 2 vols. (Gerrards Cross: Colin Smythe 1990), [5]-12, [i]-xxiv, [1]-427.pp.; Vol. 2: [1]-430pp. CONTENTS: Vol. 1: Foreword, [5]-12; General Introduction* [i]-xxiv; “Ned M’Keown” [; “The Three Tasks”; “Shane Fadh’s Wedding”; “Larry M’Farland’s Wake”; “The Battle of the Factions”; “The Station”; “The Party Fight and Funeral”; “The Lough Derg Pilgrim”; “The Hedge School”; “The Midnight Mass”; “The Donagh, or The Horse-stealers”, and “Phil Purcel the Pig-Driver”. Vol. 2: “Geography of an Irish Oath”; “The Lianhan Shee”; “Going to Maynooth”; “Phelim O’Toole’s Courtship”; “The Poor Scholar”; “Wildgoose Lodge”; “Tubber Derg”, or “The Red Well”; “Neal Malone”.

*Title given on contents page as ‘Auto-biographical Introduction’ [sic; small caps.]; in heading as ‘Traits and Stories / of the / Irish Peasantry / INTRODUCTION’, and in running header as ‘General Introduction’ [small caps.]. See Barbara Hayley’s Foreword in RICORSO Library, “Irish Critical Classics”, via index or as attached.)

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Tales of Ireland. By the Authors of Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry (Dublin: William Curry, Jun. and Company[;] Simpkin and Marshall, London, 1834), xiii, 366pp., ill. [by W. H. Brooke], 16°; cloth [7s. 6d.]; reviewed magazine notices from July 1834; copies in 15 libraries; incls. 1p. List of ‘Works on Ireland, Published by W. Curry, jun. and Co. Dublin’ (1 p. unn.), and statement ‘The Etchings by W. H. Brooke, Esq. R. H. A.’ (1p. verso of half-title), precede main t.p. in Vol. 1. Preface, pp.[vii]–xiii, dated ‘Dublin, April, 1834’. List of contents (1 p. unn.) followed by preface. Printed in Dublin by P. D. Hardy, Cecilia-street.

CONTENTS [Tales, 1834]: Preface pp.[vii]-xiii [see extract]; “The Death of a Devotee”, pp.[1]–40 [prev. in Christian Examiner, Oct. 1829]; “The Priest’s Funeral”, pp.[41]–109 [ibid., Jan.-Feb. 1830]; “Neal Malone”, pp.[111]–146; “The Brothers: A Narrative”, pp.[147]–253 [prev. in Christian Examiner (March-June 1830)]; “The Illicit Distiller”, pp.[255]–285; “The Dream of a Broken Heart”, pp.[287]–334 [prev. in Dublin University Review & Quarterly (April 1833)]; “Lachlin Murray, and the Blessed Candle”, pp.[335]–366 [prev. in Christian Examiner (Aug. 1830)]. Advert. (2pp.) for The Dublin University Magazine follows main text. Printer’s mark and colophon read: ‘Dublin: Printed by P. D. Hardy, 3, Cecilia-street’. Preface notes that ‘all the stories it contains, except “Neal Malone,” and “The Dream of a Broken Heart” - both recently published - have appeared before in an excellent periodical, whose circulation, however, in consequence of its serious character, is more limited than that of a magazine merely literary’ (p. [vii]); it also states that ‘Most of the following stories will be found to illustrate, more clearly than any I have yet written, the religious prejudices and feelings of the Irish people.’ (p. viii). [Available at Google Books - online; accessed 31.10.2011. See also English Novels 1830-36: A Bibliography of British Fiction (Cardiff) - online.]

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Jane Sinclair, or, the Fawn of Spring Vale, / The Clarionet, / and Other Tales [viz.. The Misfortunes of Barney Brannagan, and The Resurrection of Barney Bradley] / by William Carleton / author of Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry, &c., 3 vols. (Dublin: William Curry Jnr. & Co.; London: George Routledge 1843), [Vol. III, Misfortunes, &c. and Resurrection ... &c., 328pp. Printed in Dublin by Folds, Son, and Patton, 5, Bachelors Walk. [Incls. ref. to Methodists as ‘swaddlers’] Available at Google Books - online.

Tales and Sketches illustrating the Character, Usages, Traditions, Sports and Pastimes of the Irish Peasantry [later issued as Tales and Stories of the Irish Peasantry] (Dublin: James Duffy 1845), ix, 393pp. [orig. as magazine of 1840], containing “Mickey McRorey the Irish Fiddler”; “Buckramback [sic] the Country Dancing-Master”; “Mary Murray the Irish Match-Maker”; “Ben Pentland or the Gauger Outwitted”; “The Fate of Frank McKenna”; “The Rival Kempers”; “Frank Martin and the Fairies”; “A Legend of Knockmany”; “Rose Moan the Irish Midwife”; “Talbot and Gaynor Irish Pipers”; “Frank Finnegan [sic] the Foster-Brother”; “Tom Gressier [sic], the Irish Senachie”; “The Castle of Aughentain or a Legend of the Brown Goat”; “Barney McHaigney the Irish Prophecy Man’ [all the foregoing except “Talbot and Gaynor’ in Irish Penny Journal (1840-41)]; “Moll Roe’s Marriage or the Pudding Bewitched” [prev. in The Citizen (17 March 1841)]; “Barney Brady’s Goose or Dark Doings at Slathberg” [prev. in Dublin University Magazine, XI, 15 (May 1838), p.604]; “Condy Cullen or the Parent’s Trial” [prev. in ibid. (8 June 1840)]; “The Three Wishes” [prev. in Dublin University Magazine, XIV, 83 (Nov. 1838), p.600]; “The Irish Rake, Stories of Second Sight and Apparition”.

The Irishman at Home: Characteristic Sketches of the Irish Peasantry [by William Carleton] with illustrations on wood (Dublin: James McGlashan 1849), 302pp., ill. [16°].

Irish Life and Character; or, Tales and Stories of the Irish Peasantry [Tales and sketches, illustrating the character, usages ... of the Irish peasantry] (London: Henry Lea [1860]), 364pp. 8º.

The Poor Scholar, Frank Martin and the Fairies, the Country Dancing Master, and Other Irish Tales by William Carleton (Dublin: James Duffy [1869]), 252pp., 15cm. CONTENTS: “The Poor Scholar”; “Mickey M’Rorey”, “The Irish Fiddler”; “Buckram Back, the Country Dancing Master”; “Mary Murray, the Irish Match Maker”; “Bob Pentland, or the Gauger Outwitted”; “The Fate of Frank M’Kenna”; “The Rival Kempers”; “Frank Martin and the Fairies”; “A Legend of Knockmany”.

Tubber Derg, or The Red Well; Party Fight and Funeral; Dandy Kehoe’s Christening, and Other Irish Tales / by William Carleton. (Dublin: James Duffy 1869), 256pp., 16cm.

CONTENTS [Duffy 1869]: “Tubber Derg, or, The Red Eell”; “Party Fight and Funeral”; “Dandy Kehoe’s Christening”; “Talbot and Gaynor, the Irish Pipers”; “Frank Finnegan, the Foster Brother”; “The Three Wishes”.

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Amusing Irish Tales[,] by author of The Cooleen Bawn, Traits and Stories [ … &c .] 4th edn. (London: Simpkin, Marshall, Hamilton, Kent & Co.; Glasgow: Thomas D. Morison [n.d. 1889-90], 256pp.; incls. unsigned Editorial Note [pp.5-6],.

CONTENTS [1889-90]: “Buckram Back, the Country Dancing Master”; “Mary Murray, the Irish Match-maker”; “Bob Pentland, the Irish Smuggler, or The Gauger Outwitted”; “Tom Gressiey [sic], the Irish Sennachie, or The Origin of the name of Gordon”; “Barney M’Haigney, the Irish Prophecy Man”; Fin M’Coul, The Knockmany Giant”; “Around Ned’s Fireside, or The Story of the Squire”; “The Irish Student, or How The Protestant Church was Invented by Luther and the Devil”; “Mickey M’Rorey, The Country Fiddler”; Rose Moan, The Country Mid-Wife”; Corney Keho’s Baby, The Irish Christening”; “Barney Brady Goose, Mysterious Doings at Slathbeg”; “Condy Cullen, And How He defeated the Exciseman”; Phil Purcel, The Connaught Pig-Driver”; Father Philemy, The Holding of the Station’ [241].

Editorial Note [unsigned]: ‘William Carleton, an unrivalled delineator of the habits and character of his countrymen, was born at Prillisk […]. Both father and mother were persons of greatly superior mind; and although not highly educated they were better informed than most of their class and were rich in natural endowments, so that the son had considerable privileges, both in the matter of mental inheritance and early associations. The father was endowed with a marvellous memory … His mother was noted for her beautiful voice … / intended for a priest … Some years afterwards he left the Roman Catholic Church and joined the Church of England. [… H]is perusal of Gil Blas … uncongenial drudgery … started for Dublin … sum of two shillings and ninepence in his pocket … reconcile himself to the uncongenial labours of tutor. / … became acquainted with the Rev. Caesar Otway. At this gentleman’s suggestion young Carleton wrote a tale for one of the magazines, which attracted general notice. … a long stream of writings … over forty in number [vols.] …… singular power and talent … universally … acknowledged as giving true and faithful representations of the social life of his countrymen. [… /] The tales contained in this volume are selected from several of the distinguished author’s numerous works … a very considerable number.’ ‘The native habits and tastes of any people form an interesting study, and in such matters the Irish are quite as attractive as any other of the modern nations - in temperament and character they are as strongly distinctive as each of the three sister peoples. The Irish have been distinguished for their warm-hearted, affectionate disposition, capable of great goodness, faith to trust, and grateful for kindness and sympathy received. And no doubt through increased industry and improved laws these beautiful traits of character will aid in forming a distinguished future for them as a people.’ (p.6) [Note, Brown calls this a reprint of Tales and Stories, 1851, itself a rep. of Tales and Sketches. (See Stephen Brown, Ireland in Fiction, 1919.)

Carleton’s Stories of Irish Life, with an introduction by Darrell Figgis [Every Irishman’s library] (Dublin: The Talbot Press [1918]), xxxiv, 364pp., ill. [front. port.], 8°/19cm. CONTENTS: “Neal Malone”; “Phelim O’Toole’s Courtship”; “The Geography of an Irish Oath”; “Bob Pentland, or, The Gauger Outwitted”; “The Party Fight and Funeral”; “The Midnight Mass”; “The Hedge School”; “Denis O’Shaughnessy Going to Maynooth. [?Another edn. 1919.]

The Works of William Carleton, Vol. 1 [Collier’s unabridged edn.] (NY: Collier [1856]), v, 775pp., ill. [26 cm.] CONTENTS: “Willy Reilly”; “Fardorougha the Miser” [ded. Prof. James McCullough of TCD]; “The Black Baronet; or, The Chronicles of Ballytrain”; “The Evil Eye or, the Black Spectre” [sic 1856; total listing in COPAC record].

The Works of William Carleton [Collier’s Unabridged Edn.], Vol. 1 (NY: P. F. Collier Publ. 1881) [full chapter contents as per each work on general contents page], with 40 full-page ills. CONTENTS - Vol. 1: “Willy Reilly”; “Fardorougha the Miser” [ded. Prof. James McCullough of TCD]; “The Black Baronet; or, The Chronicles of Ballytrain”; “The Evil Eye or, the Black Spectre”. Vol. II: Jane Sinclair; “Lha Dhu”; “The Dead Boxer”; “Ellen Duncan”; The Proctor’s Daughter; Valentine M’Clutchy; The Tithe-Proctor; The Emigrants Of Ahadarra. Vol. III [Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry, et al.]: Introduction [to Traits]; “Ned M’Keown”; “The Three Tasks”; “Shane Fadh’s Wedding”; “Larry M’Farland’s Wake”; “The Battle Of The Factions”; “The Station”; “The Party Fight And Funeral”; “The Lough Derg Pilgrim”; “The Hedge School”; “The Midnight Mass”; “The Donagh”; “Phil Purcel, The Pig-Driver”; “The Geography Of An Irish Oath”; “The Lianhan Shee”; “Going To Maynooth”; “The Poor Scholar”; The Black Prophet, a Tale of Irish Famine; “Wildgoose Lodge” [with additional note]; Tubber Derg; or, The Red Well; Neal Malone; Art Maguire; or, The Broken Pledge [End].

Note that a New York edn. of 1896 associated with Sadlier is mentioned in Irish Literature, gen. ed. Justin McCarthy (Philadelphia & Washington 1904).

Tales & Stories

 

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The Black Prophet: A Tale of the Irish Famine [The Parlour Library, No. 1] (London & Belfast: Simms & McIntyre 1847), viii, 455pp. ill. [six illustrations by W. Harvey, engraved by Dickes; 5 lvs. of pls. & added engrav. t.p.; 16cm; 1s. 6d.] Do. [Shilling Readable Novel] (London: C. H. Clarke: [1862]), 320pp., ill. [6 pls.]; Do., intro. by D. J. O’Donoghue (London: Lawrence & Bullen 1899), xvi, 408pp., ill. [by J. B. Yeats [père]; Do. [facs. of 1847 Simms & M’Intyre edn.], intro. by Timothy Webb [rep. of 1847 Belfast edn.] (Shannon: IUP 1972), xix, xvi, 408pp.; Do., ed. Robert Lee Wolff [facs. of 1847 Simms & M’Intyre edn.] (NY: Garland Publ. 1979), 4], iv, 320pp., and Do. [Hibernia: Literature and Nation in Victorian Ireland Ser.] (Poole: Woodstock Books/Cassell 1996), 455pp. Also digitally as The Black Prophet [… &c.; copied from the Belfast Edn.] (Mich.: Thomson Gale 2005). Note: prev. published in Dublin University Magazine XXVII, 161 (May 1846), p.600ff., to XXVIII, 168, (Dec. 1846), pp.717-47.

Willie Reilly and His Dear Coleen Bawn, 3 vols. (London: Hope & Co. 1855) [prev. in the Independent, London, Dec. 1850-Jan 1851; title orth. sic. & Co. 1855) [orth. title sic; prev. in the Independent, London, Dec. 1850-Jan 1851]; and Do. [2nd edn.] corrected as [... Coolen Bawn] (Dublin: James Duffy and Co. [1857]), xiii, 422pp., ill. [by George S. Measom; 19cm.; incls. Preface to Second Edition [ix]-xiii]. Note: copy in TCD Lib. previously owned by Thomas Mulvany, Catholic Bishop of Meath [given in COPAC as Heath] with stamp of New County Hospital, Mullingar. [Available at Google Books - online.]

Willy Reilly and His Cooleen Bawn”, in The Works of William Carleton, 3 vols. (NY: P. F. Collier 1881), Vol. 1 [first item, with “Fardorougha the Miser”, “The Black Baronet; or, the Chronicle of Ballytrain”, and “The Evil Eye; or, The Black Spectre”; includes Preface to the Second Edition and XXV chapters from “An Adventure and an Escape” to “Reilly Stands Trial”] - available at Gutenberg Project (prod. by David Widger) - online.

Table of Contents: Preface [see attached]. Chap. I: An Adventure and an Escape. Chap. II.: The Cooleen Bawn. Chap. III: Daring Attempt of the Red Rapparee - Mysterious Disappearance of His Gang - The Avowal. Chap. IV. - A Sapient Project for our Hero’s Conversion - His Rival makes his Appearance, and its Consequences. Chap. V: The Plot and the Victims. Chap. VI: The Warning - an Escape. Chap. VII: An Accidental Incident favorable to Reilly, and a Curious Conversation. Chap. VIII. A Conflagration - An Escape - And an Adventure. Chap. IX. Reilly’s Adventure Continued - A Prospect of By-gone Times - Reilly gets a Bed in a Curious Establishment. Chap. X: Scenes that took place in the Mountain Cave. Chap. XI: The Squire’s Dinner and his Guests. Chap. XII: Sir Robert Meets a Brother Sportsman - Draws his Nets, but Catches Nothing. Chap. XIII: Reilly is Taken, but connived at by the Sheriff - the Mountain Mass. Chap. XIV: Reilly takes Service with Squire Folliard. Chap. XV: More of Whitecraft’s Plots and Pranks. Chap. XVI: Sir Robert ingeniously extricates Himself out of a great Difficulty. Chap. XVII: Awful Conduct of Squire Folliard - Fergus Keilly begins to Contravene the Red Rapparee. Chap. XVIII: Something not very Pleasant for all Parties. Chap. XIX: Reilly’s Disguise Penetrated - He Escapes - Fergus Reilly is on the Trail of the Rapparee - Sir Robert begins to feel Confident of Success. Chap. XX: The Rapparee Secured -Reilly and the Cooleen Bawn Escape, and are Captured. Chap. XXI: Sir Robert Accepts of an Invitation. Chap. XXII: The Squire Comforts Whitecraft in his Affliction. Chap. XXIII: The Squire becomes Theological and a Proselytizer, but signally fails. Chap. XXIV: Preparations - Jury of the Olden Time - The Scales of Justice. Chap. XXV: Rumor of Cooleen Bawn’s Treachery - How it appears - Reilly stands his Trial. Conclusion. [See extracts from Preface, under Quotations, infra.]

Willy Reilly and His Dear Coolen Bawn, / A tale founded upon fact, / by / William Carleton, [...] (NY: George Munro’s Sons, Publishers, 17 to 27 Vanderwater Street [1855]), 458pp. - pref. dated Dublin, February 1855] - copy in Univ. of Connecticut Libraries. Quote: ‘There is nothing so brace and fearless as innocence. Her youth, her majesty, her beauty, and the pathos of her expressions, absolutely flooded the court with tears [...]’ (p.444; available at Internet Archive - online.)

Willy Reilly and his Dear Cooleen Bawn (Boston: Patrick Donahoe 1856) [with a Preface dated Dublin, February 1855]. [Available at Google Books - online; accessed 05.11.2011; see Preface - attached.)

Willy Reilly and His Dear Colleen Bawn / by William Carleton; with an introduction by Ernest A. Baker [Half-forgotten ser.] (London: George Routledge and Sons, Ltd. 1904), xiii, 421pp. [19cm.] Note: This edition only uses the orth. Colleen [see COPAC]. Note the film of 1920 has the title as Colleen also. See also [...] Colleen Bawn (NY: Barnes & Noble Edn. [q.d.], 298pp.

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The Life of William Carleton: being his autobiography and letters, and an account of his life and writings, from the point at which the autobiography breaks off, completed [ed.] by David O’Donoghue, with an introduction by Mrs. Cashel Hoey, 2 vols. (London: Downey & Co. 1896) [Vol I contains an Introduction by Mrs. Cashel Hoey, pp.[i]-lv; Bibliography of Carleton’s Writings, pp.lvii-lxiv; Carleton’s autobiography up to 1828, pp.1-289 +3pp. advertisements for Downey’s list. Vol. II contains Biography by O’Donoghue, p.viii, 362pp.]; ill. with 1 lf. of pls. in each [i.e., identical port.] [21 cm.]

The Autobiography of William Carleton [first pub. as The Life of William Carleton, 2 vols. 1896 - of which this is vol. I], with a Foreword by Benedict Kiely (Belfast: White Row Press 1996), 248pp. CONTENTS [Autobiog., 1996]: Foreword by Benedict Kiely [pp.1-13 - see extract];

Chap. 1: Birthplace - McManus’s misleading picture - Parentage - The legends of the elder Carleton - Mrs Carleton’s songs - Catholic tolerance - Removal from Prillisk - Carleton goes to school - The hedge schoolmaster - State of education [15].

Chap. II: Mrs Dumont’s school - Jack Stuart’s barn - Carleton falls in love - Expulsion from school - Findramore - Pat Frayne’s academy at Skelgy Pat’s anecdotes - Sam Nelson’s joke - Pat’s method of correction - How to obtain provisions - The egg trick [24].

Chap. III: Carleton is intended for the priesthood - Popularity of political plays Catholics and Protestants - Performance of The Battle of Aughrim - A panic - Orangeism - The yeomanry - A nocturnal visit - Removal to Nurchasy - TuInavert school [33].

Chap. IV: The altars - No chapels - Removal to Springtown - Shoes and stockings not expected - Robbing an orchard - Springs and man-traps - Carleton is caught - A whimsical magistrate - A dangerous exploit [43].

Chap. V: Fondness for nature - Another love affair - Blighted affection - Anne Duffy marries - A brutal master - Retaliation - The superstitions of the elder Carleton - His death [52].

Chap. VI: A candidate for the priesthood - Pat McArdle’s scheme - Carleton takes the road as a poor scholar - His adventures - Curious dream - Its result Pat Frayne’s departure - Studying the classics [64]. Chap. VII: Tom Jones - Amoranda - Keenan’s classical school - The ‘infare’ at Cargah - The Ribbonmen - Carleton made a Ribbonman - Extent of the organization - The oath of the society - The grip [71].

Chap. VIII: The party fight - Orange and Ribbon funerals - Athletic sports - Runaway marriages - Lough Derg - The pilgrimage - Walking on water Change of religion - The female pilgrims - Nell McCallum [81].

Chap. IX: Break-up of the family - A trial of strength - The miller of Clogher - His death - Michael Carleton advises his brother to work - A great leap Carleton apprenticed to a stone-cutter - Buckramback the dancing master - Mickey McRory the fiddler - Stone-cutting abandoned - Happens on Gil Blas - Its effect [97].

Chap. X: Leaves his family at last - Father McArdle - Wildgoose Lodge - Fate of Paddy Devaun - The wayside gibbets - journeyings in Louth - Becomes a private tutor - Sir Harcourt Lees’ dogs - Carleton makes verse - Gaynor and Talbot the pipers - The dance [111].

Chap. XI: The Edinburgh Review on Carleton - Throws up tutorship - A ride in a hearse - Dundalk - Drogheda - A shirt as security - Unexpected wealth Ardee - The mathematics [128].

Chap. XII: Fitzgerald, of Fane Valley - Carleton as a story-teller - Navan - How to wash a shirt - Visit to Clongowes and Maynooth - A bully chastised Rev. Paul O’Brien - Judy Byrne - Big Magee - Celbridge - Becomes a hedge schoolmaster - On the road to Dublin [144].

Chap. XIII: Dublin - Dirty Lane - The mountebanks - The beggars at home - ‘William Carleton, Ladies’ Shoemaker’ [160].

Chap. XIV: ‘Shooting the moon’ - McDonagh, the literary tailor - The tailor’s flitting - the designing widow - Carleton tastes wine - A generous gift - The widow’s little bill - The circulating library - A new rig-out - Miscellaneous reading - A prediction [169].

Chap. XV: In search of a religion - A strange figure - Mrs Ridges ‘uncle’ - Removal to the Coombe - Return of McDonagh - Weyman and Lablanche - Love of the drama - The nondescript, and his brother - Marsh’s library - A glimpse of Maturin [180].

Chap. XVI: Love re-asserts itself - Mortimer and Samuel O’Sullivan - Matrimonial notions - Transformation of the nondescript - James Digges La Touche - Appointed to a clerkship - High Treason against the Sunday School Society - Marriage - Thomas Parnell - Ambition to enter T.C.D. - Notice to quit - Re-instatement [192].

Chap. XVII: Essay-writing - Literary vanity - Thornas Parnell victorious - Loses situation - The siege - Before the magistrate - Rev. Mr Wilson - Carleton becomes a father - Rev. Henry Newland. [204].

Chap. XVIII: Gough’s Arithmetic - Mullingar - A contributor to Westmeath Guardian - A remarkable veteran - The 93rd regiment - Wellington Guernsey - The military riot. [217].

Chap. XIX: Clothing the naked - Sir Boyle Roche’s bird - Rev. Dr Robinson - The Rochforts - Election humours - Carleton arrested for debt - Mullingar Gaol - The suspended priest - The popular idea about him - Dublin again - Carlow school - Kilkenny Goal. [227].

NOTES and AFTERWORD by D. J. O’Donoghue [238]. (See also under Quotations, infra.)

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