Edmund Burke: Works & Criticism


Works
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Reflections Regicide
Contemporary works held in Trinity College, Dublin - Burke Exhibition at TCD Library - online [n.d.]

Listing of Printed Works
Contemp. Editions
  • A Vindication of Natural Society, or A View of the Miseries and Evils arising to Mankind from Every Species of Artificial Society, in a Letter to Lord ***** by a late Noble Writer (Spring 1756; 2nd edn. 1757) [contra Bolingbroke; the second edn. first professing it was a satire on the atheistic rationalism of the other];
  • Philosophical Enquiry into the Origins of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful (London: Tegg, Todd 1756); Do. [enl. edn.] (London: Dodsley 1757); Do., with an intro. essay concerning taste ... by the Right Hon. Edmund Burke (London: Thomas McLean 1823), 262pp.; and Do. [another edn.] (Chiswick: C & C. Whittingham 1825); small 8o [copy in Marsh’s Library from collection of Bishop H. V. White];
  • An Account of the European Settlements in America (1757);
  • Tracts relative to the Laws Against Popery in Ireland [1763];
  • Thoughts on the Causes of the Present Discontents (London; Dodsley, 1770), [4], 118pp., and Do. (Dublin: G. Faulkner 1770), 8o.;
  • Speech on American Taxation (1774);
  • History of America [2 vols.] (Dublin: Wilson 1777);
  • Speech in Support of Resolutions for Conciliation with the American Colonies (22 March 1775, 1778 [i.e., two speeches]);
  • A Speech of Edmund Burke ... Guildhall Bristol (1780), 68pp. [Todd 39b];
  • Articles of Charge of High crimes and Misdemeanours, against Warren Hastings, Esq., late Gov. Gen. of Bengal, presented to the House of Commons, on the 4th [26th & 27th] day[s] of April (and the 5th of May), 1786, by Rt. Hon Edmund Burke [3 vols. in 1 vol.] (London: J. Stockdale 1786);
  • Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790); Appeal from the New Whigs to the Old Whigs (London 3 Aug. 1791) [omitted from Vol. VIII of The Writings and Speeches];
  • Speeches on the Impeachment of Warren Hastings [with introduction] (1792);
  • Heads for Consideration on the Present State of Affairs (Dec. 1792); Letter to a Member of the National Assembly (Paris, 27 Apr. 1791; London, 21 May 1791);
  • A Letter to Sir H. Langrishe Bart., M.P., on the subject of the Roman Catholics of Ireland and the propriety of admitting them to the elective franchise, consistently with the principles of the constitution as established at the revolution ([London], 3. Jan. 1972; Dublin, Feb. 1792);
  • Substance of the Speech ... in the House of Commons, 23rd May, 1794 (1794), 26pp+6pp., adverts [Todd 64b.];
  • Second Letter to Sir Hercules Langrishe (1795); Letter from the Right Hon. Edmund Burke to a Noble Lord on attacks made upon him and his pension, in the House of Lords by the Duke of Bedford [Baron Russell] and the Earl of Lauderdale in the present sessions of Parliament. (1795), 80pp.
  • A letter to Henry Duncombe, Esq., Mbr. for the County of York, on the Subject of the very extraordinary pamphlet, lately addressed by Mr Burke, to a Noble Lord, by William Miles (London: printed for J. Debrett 1796).
 
Query: A Letter to the Citizens of Dublin (replying to the Cork Surgeon’s Anecdote) by [?]Edmund Burke [3rd edn.] (Dublin: William Johnson 1749) [BML].
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Modern Editions [sel.]
  • Four Letters on the Proposals for Peace with the Regicide Directory of France (2nd edn. 1878);
  • Thoughts on the Cause of the Present Discontents; Together with Observations on a Late Publication intituled “The Present State of the Nation” / by Edmund Burke [being Burke’s Works, Vol. 1: in The New Universal Library] (London: George Routledge & Sons. Limited / NY: E. P. Dutton & Co.), 256pp.; Thoughts […, &c., p.[1]-105; Observations …&c., pp.107-256.]
  • Vincent Scully, intro., Thoughts on the Cause of the Present Discontents (Dublin: M. H. Gill 1882), 68pp
  • Henry Morley, ed. & intro., Two Speeches on Conciliation with America and Two Letters on Irish Questions (London: Routledge 1886);
  • Thomas H. D. Mahoney, ed., Reflections on the Revolution in France (New York 1955);
  • H. F. V. Somerset, ed., A Notebook of Edmund Burke and William Burke (Cambridge UP 1957), 120pp. [contents];
  • J. L. Boulton, ed., An Enquiry into the Origin of our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful (Chicago: Notre Dame UP 1958; London Routledge & Kegan Paul 1958);
  • Reflections on the Revolution in France and on proceedings in certain societies in London relative to that event, ed. with intro. Conor Cruise O’Brien (Harmondsworth: Penguin 1968), 400pp.;
  • Reflections on the French Revolution, ed., L. G. Mitchell [World’s Classics] (OUP 1993), xxiv, 326pp.
  • J. C. D. Clark, ed., Reflections on the Revolution in France: A Critical Edition (Stanford UP 2001), 446pp.
 
Collected Editions
Speeches
  • Speeches and Writings of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, 16 vols. (London: Rivington 1803-27); French Laurence & Walker King, eds., Speeches and Writings of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke [2nd Edn., enl.], 16 vols. (London: Rivington 1827), with index [incls. Life by James Prior [2 vols.], bound with Epistolary Correspondence of the Rt. Hon Edmund Burke and Dr. French Laurence;
  • Speeches of the Right Hon. Edmund Burke with memoir and historical introductions, by James Burke (Dublin: Duffy [1854]) [see details];
  • Selections from the Speeches and Writings (London: Routledge 1893), 416pp.;
  • The Speeches of Edmund Burke on the Impeachment of Warren Hastings: to which is added a selection of Burke’s Epistolary Correspondence [ Bohn’s Standard Library], 2 vols. (London: George Bell & Sons 1894) [supplementary vols. to Collected Works; “Burke’s Works” on spine ].
  • Speech on Conciliation with America, ed. and intro. with notes, F. G. Selby [Pitt Press Series] (Cambridge UP 1912), 104pp.;
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Collected Works
  • The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke: collected in three volumes. [...; 3 vols.] (London: printed for J. Dodsley, M.DCC.XCII. [1792]), 4° [Vol.1: [A]\2 B-I\4 *I\2 K-4D\4 4E\2; Vol.2: [A]\2 B-4D\4; Vol. 3: [A]\2 B-4 G\4 4H\2; the series extended to 8 vols. by Rivingtons, i.e. 5 add. vols., 1802-1827; ESTC TO52808];
  • The Works of ... Edmund Burke [... &c.], 3 vols. (Dublin: printed [by William Porter] for Messrs. R. Cross, W. Wilson, P. Wogan, L. White, P. Byrne, A. Grueber, J. Moore, W. Jones, W. McKenzie, H. Watts, J. Rice, G. Folingsby 1792-93), 8° [Vols. 1 & 3 dated 1792; Vol. 2 dated 1793, bearing imprint of Cross et al. in that vol.;]; Do. [microfilm of Dublin edn. rep. Woodbridge, CT: Research Publications, Inc., 1986]; The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, 8 vols. (London: F. and C. Rivington; Sold also by J. Hatchard 1801), 23cm. [to which were added Vols. 9-10 in 1812 and Vols. 11-12 in 1813];
  • The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, 8 vols. (London: C & J. Rivington 1825), 8° [held at Bristol UL];
  • The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke. A new edition, 12 vols. (London: Printed for F. and C. Rivington; sold also by J. Hatchard, 1803-1813), 25cm.
  • The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke. First American, from the last London edition, 4 vols. (Boston: John West; O. C. Greenleaf, 1806, 1807), 8°;
  • The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke. A New Edition, 16 vols. (London: F. C. & J. Rivington 1815-27), 8° 22cm] ; and. Do. [new edn.] (London: Printed for C. and J. Rivington 1826-1827) [vols. 15-16 London 1827; the whole available electronically from Thompson Gale 2005];
  • The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke [8 vols.] (London: George Bell 1823); and Do. as The Works of Edmund Burke, with a portrait and life of the author, 8 vols. (London: Thomas McLean 1823) [King’s Coll., London];
  • The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, reprinted from the Last London Edition[,] Vol. V (Boston: Wells & Lilly, Court Street [Boston] 1826) [incls. Tracts Relative to the Laws Against Popery in Ireland, pp.217ff.; available at Google Books, in copy from the Estate of Robert K. Root, held at Princeton UL];
  • The Works of the Right Hon. Edmund Burke, with a biographical and critical introduction [by Henry Rogers] and portrait after Sir Joshua Reynolds, 2 vols. (London: Holdsworth & Ball 1834), ill. [1 lf. of pls.], 8°.
  • The Works of the Right Hon. Edmund Burke: with a biographical and critical introduction, by Henry Rogers. And portrait after Sir Joshua Reynolds, 2 vols. (London: Samuel Holdsworth, Amen Corner, Paternoster Row, MDCCCXXXVII [1837]), ill. [pl. port.], 8° [printed in columns].
  • The Works of Edmund Burke, with a biography, intro. by H[enry] Rogers, 2 vols. (London: Samuel Holdsworth printed by John Childs & Son, Bungay 1842), 8°;
  • The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke [New and improved edn.], 9 vols. (London: H. G. Bohn 1845), 23cm.; Do., with a biographical and critical introduction by Henry Rogers [2 vols.; British Classics ser.] (London: Bohn 1848-50), and Do., 6 vols. (London: Bohn 1855-56), and Do., 8 vols. (London: Bohn 1854-89); and Do., 8 vols. [Bohn Edn.] (London: George Bell & Sons 1899-1917) [see contents];
  • The Works of Edmund Burke, 12 vols. [rev. edn.] (Boston: Little, Brown 1865-67);
  • The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke in Twelve Volumes [12 vols.] (London: John C. Nimmo, 14, King William Street, Strand, W.C. MDCCCLXXXVII) [see contents; see also modern German rep. of same from Olms, Hildesheim];
  • [Judge] William Willis & F. W. Raffety, eds., Works of the Rt. Hon Edmund Burke, / with a general introduction by the late Judge Willis and a preface by F.W. Rafferty [World’s Classics] (OUP 1906-07) [Vols. 2, 4, 5 & 6 intro. by Raffety; Vol. 6, p.405]; and Do. [with add. vol.], 7 vols. (Oxcord UP 1906-1935);
  • Thomas W. Copeland, gen. ed., Correspondence Of Edmund Burke, with Barbara Lowe, O. J. Marshall, and John A. Woods, 10 vols. (Cambridge UP; Chicago UP 1958-78) [9 vols.+index];
  • Paul Langford, gen. ed., The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke, 9 vols. (Oxford: Clarendon Press 1981-97) [see contents]
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Selected writings
  • Matthew Arnold, ed., Letters / Speeches and Tracts / on Irish Affairs / by / Edmund Burke / collected and arranged by / Matthew Arnold / with a preface (London: Macmillan & Co. 1881), xiii, 439pp. 8º [online]; Do. [another edn.] (Dublin 1886); and Do., with new introduction by Conor Cruise O’Brien [rep. of 1881 Edn.] (London: Cresset Press 1988), xxxxii, 439pp. [see contents].
  • Hugh Law, ed., Speeches and Letters on American Affairs [Everyman] (London: J. M. Dent 1908) [see contents];
  • Reflections on the French Revolution and Other Essays, intro. by A. J. Grieve [Everyman No.460] (London: J. M. Dent [1910]), 361pp. [ incl. ‘Notes on the French Revolution’, pp.331-61];
  • E. J. Payne, ed., intro. & annot., Select Works of Edmund Burke [English Classics Ser.; New ed. with additions and corrections] (Oxford: Clarendon Press 1977), 17 cm. [see contents].
  • A. M. D. Hughes, ed. Selections from Edmund Burke, with Essays by Hazlitt, Arnold and Others (Oxford, 1930);
  • Sir Philip Magnus, ed., Selected Prose of Edmund Burke [1st ed.] (Liverpool: Falcon Press 1948), 99pp. [see links to Atkinson edition online under References, infra];
  • Ross J. S. Hoffman, ed., Burke’s Politics: Selected Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke on Reform, Revolution and War (NY 1949) [another edn. 1970].
  • Iain Hamspher-Monk, ed., Political Philosophy of Edmund Burke (London: Longman 1987), xxi, 284pp.;
  • Adam Phillips, ed. & intro., Philosophical Enquiry [ ... &c.] [World’s Classics] (OUP 1990), xxvii, 173pp.;
  • Ian Harris, ed., Edmund Burke, Pre-Revolutionary Writings [Cambridge Texts in history of Pol. Thought] (Cambridge UP 1993);
  • Isaac Kramnick, ed. & intro., The Portable Edmund Burke [Viking Portable Library] (NY: Penguin Books 1999), xliii, 573pp. [20cm.; incls. “French Revolution”].
  • Peter J. Stanlis, ed., Edmund Burke: Selected Writings and Speeches, with a new preface by the editor (New Brunswick, N.J. ; London: Transaction Publs. [2007]), xiv, 702pp.
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Miscellaneous
  • The Minute Book, and Notes [The text of the Minute Book of the Debating Club, for April-July, 1747. Written by Edmund Burke. With a facsimile; by Debating Club [of] Trinity College [Dublin] - vide, A. P. I. S [Arthur Purefoy Irwin Samuels], The Early Life, Correspondence and Writings of the Rt. Hon. Edmund Burke ... With a transcript of the Minute Book of the Debating “Club” founded by him in Trinity College, Dublin ... With an introduction and supplementary chapters on Burke’s Contributions to the “Reformer” and his part in the Lucas controversy, by ... Arthur Warren Samuels (Cambridge: University Press, 1923), xiv, 418pp., ill. [pl. XI], 8°.
 

For some Transactions of the Historical Society (TCD), see Wm. Dennis, and W. C., ‘Unpublished Remains of Edmund Burke’, in The National Magazine, Vol. 1, No. 1 (July 1830), pp.90-97 - i.e., letters to Richard Shackleton [available at JSTOR - online].

Responses to Burke incl.
  • Sir Brooke Boothb[y], Bart., Observations on the Appeal from the New to the old Whigs, and on Mr. Paine’s Rights of Man, in 2 pts. (London: printed for J. Stockdale 1792);
  • A Letter to Edmund Burke, Esq; controverting the principles of American government, laid down in his lately published speech on American taxation, delivered in the House of Commons on the 19th of April, 1774 [Signed: Constitutio] (Postscript.-A Draught for a Bill, proposed to be brought into Parliament, for restoring peace and harmony between Great-Britain and the British Colonies in North-America, etc.). [...]

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Bibliographical details
The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke [Bohn’s British Classics] (London: Henry G. Bohn 1854-1869), ill. [port.] CONTENTS: Vol. 1: Vindication of Natural Society. Essay on the sublime and the beautiful. Vol. 2: Political miscellanies. Reflections on the Revolution in France. Letter to a member of the National Assembly. Vol. 3: . Political miscellanies. Vol. 4: Reports on Administration of Justice in India. Charge against Warren Hastings. Vol. 5: Charge against Warren Hastings Concluded; Political letters. Vol. 6: Miscellaneous Speeches, Letters and Fragments. Abridgement of English History, &c. With a general index. [Note: Vol. 1 has title: Life of the right honourable Edmund Burke.] Note Another edn. [Bohn’s Standard Library], 6 vols. (London: G. Bell 1882-86), 19cm.

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Matthew Arnold, ed., Letters, Speeches and Tracts on Irish Affairs (London: Macmillan 1881 & Co.), xiii, 439pp.. 8º; Do. [another edn.] (Dublin 1886); and Do., as Irish Affairs [by] Edmund Burke, ed. by Matthew Arnold, with new introduction by Conor Cruise O’Brien [rep. of 1881 Edn.] (London: Cresset Press 1988), xxxxi, 439pp. CONTENTS: Introduction to the Cresset Library edition [vii]; Preface [xxxvii; see note]; I. Tract on the Popery Laws [1]; II. A Letter to Sir Charles Bingham, Bart, in the Irish Absentee Tax [70]; III. A Letter to the Honourable Charles James Fox [84]; IV. Two Letter to Gentlemen in Bristol: To Samuel Span, Esq., Master of the Society of Merchant Adventurers of Bristol [97]; To Messrs --- and Co., Bristol [108]; V. Mr. Burke’s Speech at the Guildhall in Bristol, 1780 [116]; VI. A Letter to a Peer of Ireland on the Penal Laws against Irish Catholics [182]; VII. A Letter to Sir Hercules Langrishe, M.P.,, 1792 [206]; VIII. A Letter to the Right Honourable Edmund Pery [279]; IX. A Letter to Thomas Burgh, Esq. [288]; X. A Letter to John Merlot, Esq. [317]; XI. A Letter to William Smith, Esq. [322]; XII. A Second Letter to Sir Hercules Langrishe [334]; XIII. A Letter to Richard Burke, Esq. [343]; XIV. A Letter on the Affairs of Ireland, 1797 [373]. Private Letters. A Letter to the Duke of Portland [390]; A Letter to the rev. Dr. Hussey, 1795 [394]; A Letter to the Same [401]; A Letter to Thomas Keogh, Esq. [410]; A Letter to the Ref Dr. Hussey, 1796 [416]; A Letter to the Right Hon. William Windham [436]; A Letter to Dr. Laurence [438]. Note: Prefatory pages in the Cresset edition vii-xxxxii [sic for xlii of which cover and table of contents occupy pp.i-vi and O’Brien’s preface occupies pp.vii-xxxvi, while Arnold’s preface occupies xxxviii-xxxxii compared with v-ix in the original 1881 edition, which supplies the table of contents after.] (For full-text version of Arnold’s edition, see RICORSO Library, “Irish Classics”, via index or direct.)

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The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke in Twelve Volumes [12 vols.] (London: John C. Nimmo, 14, King William Stree, Strand, W.C. MDCCCLXXXVII [1887]) - CONTENTS. Vol. 1: Advertisement to the Reader, prefixed to the First Octavo Edition [v]; Advertisement to the Advertisement ot the Reader, Prefixed to the Second Octavo Edition [xvii]; A Vindication of Natural Society; or, A View of the Miseries and Evils Arising to Mankind from Every Species of Artificual [sic] Society [1]; A Philosophical Inquiry Into The Origin Of Our Ideas of the The Sublime and Beautiful; With an Introductory Discourse Concerning Taste [67]; A Short Account Of A Late Short Administration [263]; Observations On A Late Publication, Intituled, "The Present State Of The Nation" [269]; Thoughts On The Cause Of The Present Discontents [433]. (For list of full-series contents, with links to digital versions at the Gutenberg Project, see attached.)

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E. J. Payne, ed., intro. & annot., Select Works of Edmund Burke [Clarendon Press English Classics Ser.; New ed. with additions and corrections], 2 vols. in 1 (Oxford: Clarendon Press 1977), lxii, 328; lxx, 384pp. 17 cm. [Vol. 1. Thoughts on the Present Discontents; The Two Speeches on America, ixii, 328pp.; Vol. 2: Reflections on the Revolution in France, ixx, 384pp.], and Do., 2 vols. [facs. of 2-vol. Clarendon Press Edn. of 1881-88] (Birmingham, Ala.: Legal Classics Library 1990) [17cm.; printed priv. for Legal Classics Library]. See also Selected Works of Edmund Burke, 3 vols. [new imp. of Payne Edn.] (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund 1999), 406, 434pp. [Vol. 1 invls. Thoughts on the Cause of the Present Discontents, The Two Speeches on America; Vol. 2: Reflections on the Revolution in France. Vol. 3: Letters on a Regicide Peace]. (Accessible on internet at

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Thomas W. Copeland, gen. ed., Correspondence Of Edmund Burke, compiled by Barbara Lowe O. J. Marshall, John A. Woods, 10 vols. [9 vols. + Index] (Cambridge UP; Illinois UP 1958-78), Vol. 1, ed. Copeland (1958); Vol. 2, ed. Lucy Sutherland (1960); Vol. 3, ed. George G. Gutteridge (1961); Vol. 4, ed. John A. Woods (1963), Vol. 5, ed. Holden Furber assisted by P. J. Marshall (1965), Vol. 6, ed. Alfred Cobban and Robert A Smith (1967), Vol. 7, ed. P. J. Marshall and John A. Woods (1968), Vol. 8, ed. R. B. McDowell (1969), xvv+475pp.; Vol. 9, ed. R. B. McDowell and John A. Woods (1970), 487pp.; Vol. 10, Index (1978), 507pp.

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Paul Langford, gen. ed., The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke, 9 vols. (Oxford: Clarendon Press 1981-97), incls. Vol. 1: T.O. McLoughlin [of Harare] & James T. Boulton [of Birmingham], ed., The Early Writings; textual editor for the writings William B. Todd [ Vol. 1] (Oxford: Clarendon Press 1997), xv, 589pp. Vol. 2: “Party, Parliament, and the American Crisis 1766-74” (1981), xvii, 508pp.; Vol. 5: Pt. 1, “India, The Launching of the Hastings Impeachment”, ed. P. J. Marshall; Pt. 2, “India, Madras and Bengal 1774-85”, ed. Thomas Copeland (1981), xv, 667pp. Vol. 6: “India: The Launching of the Hastings Impeachment, 1786-88”, ed. P. J. Marshall (OUP 1991). Vol. 8: L. G. Mitchell, ed., “The French Revolution, 1790-94” (1989). Vol. 9: R. B. McDowell, ed., Pt. I, The Revolutionary War, Sept. 1794-April 1797; Pt. II, Ireland (1991), xvii, 723pp. [see Vol. IX, contents].

Paul Langford, gen. ed., The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke, Vol. IX; I: The Revolutionary War, 1794-97; II, Ireland, ed. R. B. McDowell, textual ed. for the writings, William B. Todd (Oxford: Clarendon Press 1991) [ded. to Thomas W. Copeland, 1907-79]; CONTENTS: incls. [inter al.,] Letter to William Elliot; Fourth Letter on a Regicide Peace, 1795 [sic]; Thoughts and Details on Scarcity, 1795; Letter to a Noble Lord, 1796; First letter [sic] on a Regicide Peace, 1796; Second Letter on a Regicide Peace, 1796; Third Letter on a Regicide Peace, 1797; On Ireland, ‘Address and Petition to the Irish Catholics’, 1764; Tracts relating to the Popery Laws, 1765; Speech on Prorogation of Irish Parliament, 3 May 1770; Speeches on Irish Banking, Trade, Civil Establishment, etc.; Letter to Thomas Burgh, 1 Jan. 1780; Letter to Lord Kenmare, 21 Feb. 1 1782; Speech on Irish Crisis, 8 April 1782; Speech on Affairs of Ireland, May 1782; another, Dec. 1782; Speech on Irish commercial Propositions, 21 Feb.; 19 May, 1785; Letter to Sir Hercules Langrishe, 1792; Letter to Williams smith, 29 Jan. 1795; 2nd Letter to Sir Hercules Langrishe, 26 May 1795, Letter to Unknown, 1797; also speeches on Mutiny Bill, &c.

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Conor Cruise O’Brien, The Great Melody (1996) lists WORKS: The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke [dedicated to Thomas Copeland], gen. ed., Paul Langford; Vol. 2, Party, Parliament, and the American Crisis, 1766-1774’, ed. Paul Langford (1981); Vol. 5, India, 1 The Launching of the Hastings Impeachment, ed. P. J. Marshall; 2, India, Madras and Bengal 1774-1785, ed. Thomas Copeland (1981); Vol. 6, The launching of the Hastings Impeachment 1786-1788, ed. P. J. Marshall; Vol. 8, The French Revolution 1790-94, ed. L. G. Mitchell [‘a regrettable aberration which O’Brien especially castigates as a Namierite]; Vol. 9, 1: The Revolutionary War; 2: Ireland, both ed. R. B. McDowell. LETTERS: Correspondence of Edmund Burke, gen. ed., Thomas Copeland, Vol. 1 ed. Copeland (1958); Vol. 2, ed. Lucy Sutherland (1960); Vol. 3, ed. George G. Gutteridge (1961); Vol. 4, ed. John A. Woods (1963), Vol. 5, ed. Holden Furber assisted by P. J. Marshall (1965), Vol. 6, ed. Alfred Cobban and Robert A. Smith (1967), Vol. 7, ed. P. J. Marshall and John A Woods (1968), Vol. 8, ed. R. B. McDowell (1969), Vol. 9, ed. R. B. McDowell and John A Woods (1970), Vol. X, Index (1978). TRACTS: Letter to a Member of the National Assembly (Paris, 27 April 1791; London, 21 May 1791); Appeal from the New Whigs to the Old Whigs (London 3 Aug. 1791); 1792, Heads for Consideration on the Present State of Affairs (Dec. 1792) [440-46; see O’Brien’s remarks on same, infra]. Note: Tracts Relative to the Popery Laws commonly dated 1763 but c.1769 in O’Brien.

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A Notebook of Edmund Burke: Poems, Characters, Essays And Other Sketches in the Hands of Edmund and William Burke Now Printed for the First time in Their Entirety and edited by H. V. F. Somerset (Cambridge UP 1957). CONTENTS : Foreword by Sir Ernest Barker [ix]; Introduction [3]; 1. The Muse Divorced. (Poem) EB [21]; 2. The Answer to it. (Poem) WB [26]; 3. The Pillow. (Poem) WB [28]; 4. An Answer to the Pillow. EB [29]; 5. An Epistolary Essay on the Natural History of a Buck [WB] 31; 6. An Epistle to Dr Nugent. (Poem) EB [35]; 7. A Funeral Oration on the Inspector (Dr John Hill) EB [42]; 8. [A Plan for Arguing. EB] [45]; 9. A Letter to Sir James Lowther. EB [49]; 10. The Character of -- [Mrs Edmund Burke]. EB [52]; 11. A Character of the same Lady. WB [55]; 12. The Character of Phidippus. EB [57]; 13. The Way to Preferment. EB [60]; 14. The Man of Spirit. EB [63]; 15. A true Genius. EB [65]; 16. Religion of No efficacy considered as a State Engine. EB [67]; 17. Religion. EB [69]; 18. A Dialogue [75]. The notebook was the property of Lord Fitzwilliam [heir of Rockingham], now deposited in Sheffield Public Library and enscribed ‘found among the papers of Mr. Wm. Burke by W. Cuppage’. [EB & WB here abbreviations for Edmund and William Burke resp.] See also papers of William Burke in the Wentworth Woodhouse Papers.

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Microfilm editions, The Papers of Edmund Burke, 1729-97 from the Sheffield Archives & Northamptonshire Record Office [on 25 reels of 35mm silver-halide positive microfilm; £1,750], being Part I of ‘Politics in the Age of Revolution’. [Adam Matthew Publ., Oxford St., Marlborough, Wiltshire, England, SN8 1AP.]; Declan Budd & Ross Hinds, eds., The Hist and Edmund Burke’s Club: An antholog of the College Historical Society, the Student Debating Society of Trinity College, from its origins in Edmund Burke’s Club 1747-1997 (Budd & Hinds 1997).

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[James Burke [ed.,] The Speeches of the Right Hon. Edmund Burke, with memoir and historical introductions by James Burke Esq., A.B., Barrister-at-Law, author of “Memoir of Thomas Moore” (Dublin: James Duffy 1854), 456pp., 8o.; Do., Another edn. ([7 Wellington Quay; and 22, Paternoster Row, London, 1862), 456pp. [17.7 cm.]; and Do. [another edn.] (Dublin & London London 1867), 456pp. 19 cm. See also Speeches ... to which is added his letter on the Union with a commentary on his career and character (Duffy [c.1853]), 468p. [BLib]. Note that Burke subscribes his address to the Preface as “5, Eccles St., Dublin, Dec. 1853” and acknowledges the help of works by Bissett, Prior and Croly, et al.

Hugh Law, intro., Burke’s Speeches and Letters on American Affairs, introduced by Hugh Law (London & Toronto: J. M. Dents’ Sons Ltd.; NY: Dutton 1915), xii, 295 [Index, 289]. [first issued 1908, rep.1911, &c.] CONTENTS: SPEECHES: American Taxation [1]; Speech at his Arrival at Bristol before the Election in that City [64]; Speech to the Electors of Bristol [68]; On Conciliation with the Colonies [76]; LETTERS AND ADDRESSES: Letter to the Marquis of Rockingham [145]; Letter to the Marquis of Rockingham [153]; An Address to the King [161]; Address to the British Colonists in North America [178]; A Letter to John Farr and John Harris, Esqrs., on the Affairs of America [189]; Letter to Dr. Benjamin Franklin [235]; Letter from Benjamin Franklin to Edmund Burke [238]; APPENDIX: Short Account of a late Short Administration [239]; Observations on a late Publication, intituled, “The Present State of the Nation” [242]; INDEX [289]. Law ends his introduction [vii-xii] with the following list: Published works: A Vindication of Natural Society, etc., 1756; A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of the Sublime and the Beautiful, 1756; second edition, including A Discourse on Taste, 1757; The Present State of the Nation, 1769; Thoughts on the Causes of the Present Discontents, 1770; Political Tracts and Speeches, Dublin, 1777; Speeches, 4 vols., London, 1816; Reflections on the Revolution in France, 1790; Thoughts and Details on Scarcity, 1795; Thoughts on the Prospect of a Peace with the Regicide Directory, Letters I and II, 1796; Letter III, 1797; Letter IV, 1812. Collected Works — 1792-1827, 8 vols. (vols. 4-8 edited by Walker King, Bishop of Rochester, and were published at irregular periods); a new edition, 16 vols., 1803-27; 12 vols., 1808-13. Works and Correspondence, 8 vols., London, 1852; Works, Bohn’s British Classics, 8 vols., 1853, with life by Prior; Works, revised edition, Boston, Mass., 12 vols., 1865-67; Correspondence, edited by Earl Fitzwilliam and Sir R. Bourke, 4 vols., 1844. Life. — Charles MacCormick, 1798; Robert Bisset, 1798, 1800; Sir James Prior (with specimens of poetry and letters, etc.), 1824; second edition, 1826; fifth edition (Works, Bohn’s British Classics), 1854; George Croby (Blackwood’s Magazine), 1840; P. Burke, 1851; MacKnight, “History of the Life and Times of Edmund Burke,” 1858; Sir Joseph Napier (Lecture), 1863; John Morley, “Burke, a Historical Study,” 1867; English Men of Letters, 1879; E. A. Pankhurst, “Edmund Burke, a Study of Life and Character,” 1886; W. Willis (Lecture), 1889; O. Schaedel, 1898; T. D. Pillans, “Edmund Burke Apostle of Justice and Liberty,” 1905. [1908 is available in PDF, Plain Text, ePub, &c., at Open Library online.]

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Fintan Cullen, ed., Sources in Irish Art: A Reader (Cork UP 2000), contains Edmund Burke’s Philosophical Enquiry; Samuel Madden; Lady Morgan’s Life of Salvator Rosa; David Wilke’s letter from Ireland; Thomas Davis; George Petrie; W. B. Yeats; Elizabeth Thompson, Mainie Jellet, and others.

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Criticism
Bibliographies
  • Thomas H. D. Mahoney, Edmund Burke and Ireland (Harvard UP 1960) - Bibliography [attached].
  • George Watson, The New Cambridge Bibliography of English ..., Volume 2: 1660-1800 (Cambridge UP 1971), pp.1183-91ff. - “Essays and Pamphleteers” > Edmund Burke [Google Books online; accessed 08.03.2011].
  • William B. Todd & William Burton, A Bibliography of Edmund Burke (London: Hart Davies 1964); Do., rep. [St Paul’s Bibl.] (London: Godalming 1982), 316pp.
  • C. I. Gandy & Peter J. Stanlis, Edmund Burke, A Bibliography of Secondary Sources to 1982 (London: Garland Press 1983), xxx, 357pp.

See Handbook and Reading List for Cath Sharrock, The Spirit of the Age: Writing and Revolution, 1789-1832 - LITE3X47 at Univ. of East Anglia (2010) - pdf. [accessed 02.03.2011] .

General Studies
Irish-studies commentaries
  • Liam Barry, Our Burke Legacy: A Survey of Some of His Works; and A Broad Analysis from the Literary Aspect (Cork: Paramount Printing House 1952), 235pp.
  • Thomas H. D. Mahoney, Edmund Burke and Ireland (Harvard UP 1960), 413pp. [Bibliography, see attached].
  • F. P. Canavan, The Political Reason of Edmund Burke (Duke UP 1960).
  • Conor Cruise O’Brien, ed., and intro., Reflections on the Revolution in France (1968);
  • Michael Wynne, ‘Reflections on “Art and Oratory”’, Éire-Ireland, 5, 2 (Summer 1970), pp.95-102.
  • Seamus Deane, ‘Edmund Burke and the Ideology of Irish Liberalism’ in The Irish Mind, ed. Richard Kearney (Dublin: Wolfhound Press 1985), pp.141-56.
  • Seamus Deane, ‘The Literary Myths of the Revival’, in Celtic Revivals (London: Faber & Faber 1985), pp.28-37.
  • Conor Cruise O’Brien, The Great Melody: A Thematic Biography and Commented Anthology of Edmund Burke (London: Sinclair Stevenson 1992), xvi, 692pp., and Do., abridged by Jim McCue, ed., Conor Cruise O’Brien, Edmund Burke (New Island Books; Sinclair-Stevenson 1997).
  • Terry Eagleton, ‘Aesthetics and Politics in Edmund Burke’, in Irish Literature and Culture, ed. Michael Kenneally [Irish Literary Studies, 35] (Gerrards Cross: Colin Smythe 1992), pp.25-34 [see also infra, 1995].
  • L[ouis] M. Cullen, ‘Burke, Ireland and Revolution’, Eighteenth Century Life, 16, 1 (Feb. 1992), pp.21-42
  • Ian Harris, Edmund Burke: Pre-Revolutionary Writings [Cambridge Texts for Hist. of Pol. Thought] (Cambridge UP 1993).
  • Bruce Frohnen, Virtue and the Promise of Conservatism: The legacy of Burke and de Tocqueville (Kansas UP [q.d.]), 251pp.
  • R. B. McDowell, [chapter on Burke] in The United Irishmen: Republicanism, Radicalism, and Rebellion, ed. Dickson, Keogh, Whelan (Dublin: Lilliput Press 1993), xii, 378pp. [Bicentennary conference in Belfast & Dublin, 1991].
  • Seamus Deane, ‘Montesquieu and Burke’, in Ireland and France - A Bountiful Friendship: Essays in Honour of Patrick Rafroidi, ed. Barbara Hayley & Christopher Murray (Gerrards Cross: Colin Smythe 1992), pp.17-29.
  • Marilyn Butler, ed., Burke, Paine, Godwin and the Revolution Controversy (Cambridge UP 1994), xii, 260pp. [selections from John Horne Tooke, Richard Price, Edmund Burke, Mary Wollstonecraft, Helen Maria Williams, Joseph Priestley, James Mackintosh, Arthur Young, Tom Paine, William Cobbett, Samuel Horsley, Richard Watson, William Godwin, Hannah More, Daniel Isaac Eaton, Thomas Spence, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Joseph Ritson, John Thelwall, 'The Antijacobin', Gilbert Wakefield, & William Wordsworth].
  • Deirdre Lynch, ‘Nationalising Women and Domesticating Fiction: Edmund Burke and the Genre of Englishness’, in Wordsworth Circle, 25 [1994], pp.45-49.
  • Terry Eagleton, ‘Ascendancy and Hegemony’, [Chap. 2] in Heathcliff and the Great Hunger: Studies in Irish Culture (London: Verso 1995), pp.27-103; esp. 32-53].
  • Robert Mahony, Jonathan Swift: The Irish Identity (Yale UP 1995), xvii, 222pp., ill.
  • Jim McCue, Edmund Burke and Our Present Discontents (London: Claridge Press 1997), 208pp.
  • Margot Gayle Backus, ‘“Something valuable of their own”: Children, Reproduction, and Irony in Swift, Burke, and Edgeworth’, in The Gothic Family Romance: Heterosexuality, Child Sacrifice and the Anglo-Irish Colonial Order (London: Duke UP 1999) [q.pp.]
  • Declan Kiberd, ‘Burke, Ireland and Revolution’, in Irish Classics (London: Granta 2000), pp.203-20.
  • Luke Gibbons, Edmund Burke and Ireland: Aesthetics, Politics and the Colonial Sublime (Cambridge UP 2003), 303pp. [infra].
  • Seamus Deane, Foreign Affections: Essays on Edmund Burke (Cork UP 2005), 300pp.
  • Siobhán Kilfeather, ‘Edmund Burke’s Gothic Imagination’, in The Irish Review, 33, 1 (June 2005), pp.118-24.
  • Sean Patrick Donlan, ed., Edmund Burke’s Irish Identities (Blackrock: Irish Academic Press 2007), 288pp.
  • Claire Connolly, ‘Ugly Criticism: Edmund Burke and Irish Literature’, in Field Day Review, 4 (2008), pp.236-57.
  • Bryan Fanning, ‘ Edmund Burke and the case for Union’, in Histories of the Irish Future (London: Bloomsbury 2015), pp.41-54[Chap. 4; partially available at Google Books - online].
Sundry commentaries
  • Sir James Prior, Memoir[s] of the Life and Character of Edmund Burke, 2 vols. ([1824] 2nd ed. 1826), 323pp.; also Life of Edmund Burke by James Prior: Works (6 vols.).
  • Speeches of Edmund Burke (2 vols. [Bohn’s British Classics, 9 vols. (1854-57).
  • Do., as Life of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke [5th Edn.] (London 1854), and Do. (NY: Fowle 1879), [another edn.] (London 1888).
  • John Morley, Edmund Burke: A Historical Study (London : Macmillan & Co. 1867), xv, [1], 312p. [prev. in part in Fortnightly Review, of which Morley was the editor]; Do. [new edn.] (London: Macmillan 1887), viii, 315pp.; Do. [def. rev. edn.] (London: Macmillan , 1923), vi, 318pp.; Do. (NY: A. A. Knopf 1924), 8, 255pp. [780 copies]; Do. [rep. of 1867 edn.] (NY: Arno Press 1979), xv, 312pp.
  • John Morley, Burke [English Men of Letters ser.] (London: Macmillan 1879), viii, 216pp.; Do. [7th thousand] (Macmillan 1880); Do. [rep. edn.] (London: Macmillan 1882, 1885, 1888, 1892); and Do. [with corrigs.] (London: Macmillan 1894, 1888, 1892, 1902, 1906, 1907, 1909, 1911, 1913 ... 1925. 1936) [see details].
  • James L. Batchelder, The Genius of Edmund Burke ([The author]: Chicago 1866), 50pp. [12o.]
  • J. B. Robertson, Lectures on the life writings and times of Edmund Burke (London: John Philip 1869, 1872), xliii, 407pp.; and Do. [another edn.] (Dublin: McGlashan & Gill 1875).
  • William O’Brien [MP for Cork], Edmund Burke as an Irishman (Dublin: M. H. Gill 1924), 317pp., and Do. [2nd edn.] (Dublin: M. H. Gill & Son 1926), pp. xvi. 335. 8°. [with Burke’s Letter to a Noble Lord as appendix].
  • Arthur[Warren] Samuels, Early Life, Correspondence and Writings of The Rt. Hon. Edmund Burke LL.D. [...] With a transcript of the Minute Book of the Debating “Club” founded by him in Trinity College, Dublin, intro. & suppl. chaps. on Burke’s Contributions to the Reformer and his part in the Lucas controversy (Cambridge UP 1923), xiv. 418pp., ill.
  • A. C. Cobban, Edmund Burke and the Revolt Against the Eighteenth Century [2nd edn.] (London: Allen & Unwin 1929).
  • Rev. Robert H Murray, Edmund Burke, A Biography (Oxford, 1931).
  • Sir Philip Magnus, Edmund Burke: A Life (London: John Murray 1939).
  • Donald C. Bryant, Edmund Burke and his Literary Friends [Washington Univ. Studies; n.s., Lang. & Lit., No. 9] (St. Louis 1939 ; rep. Washington UP 1969).
  • Dixon Wecter, Edmund Burke and His Kinsmen, A Study of the Statesman’s Financial Integrity and Private Relationships (Colorado UP 1939).
  • Donald Cross Bryant, Edmund Burke and His Literary Friends [Washington University Studies, 9; n.s., Language & Literature] (St. Louis, Missouri: [Washington University] 1939), xii, 323pp.
  • Thomas W. Copeland, Our Eminent Friend Edmund Burke, Six Essays (New Haven 1949; London: Jonathan Cape 1950).
  • Charles W. Parkin, The Moral Basis of Burke’s Political Thought, An Essay (Cambridge UP 1956), viii, 145pp.
  • Ross J. S. Hoffman, Edmund Burke: New York Agent, with his letters to the New York Assembly and intimate correspondence with Charles O’Hara 1761-1776 [Memoirs of the American Philosophical Society, 41] (Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society 1956), 632pp.
  • Peter J. Stanlis, Edmund Burke and the Natural Law (Michigan UP 1958), 311pp.; and Do. [new edn.] (Michigan UP 1965), xiv,305pp., pb.
  • Carl B. Cone, Burke and the Nature of Politics, 2 vols. (Lexington: Kentucky UP 1957-64).
  • Thomas Edwin Utley, Edmund Burke (London: British Council 1957; Do., [with add. bibl.] 1967).
  • J. L. Boulton, The Language of Politics in the Age of Wilkes and Burke (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul; Toronto UPP 1963); Do. [rep. edn.; Studies in Political History; Routledge Library Edns.: Political Science, 39] (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul 2010), xiii, 282pp.
  • C. P. Courtney, Montesquieu and Burke (OUP 1963).
  • R. R. Fennessy, Burke, Paine, and the Rights of Man: A Difference of Political Opinion (La Hague: M. Nijhoff 1963), ix, 274pp. [Diss. at Université catholique, Louvain];
  • Neal Wood, ‘The Aesthetic Dimension of Burke’s Political Thought’, in The Journal of British Studies, 4, 1 (1964) [q.pp.].
  • William B. Todd, A Bibliography of Edmund Burke (1964).
  • Gerald W. Chapman, Edmund Burke: The Practical Imagination (Harvard UP 1967), x, 350pp.
  • B. T. Wilkins, The Problem of Burke’s Political Philosophy (OUP 1967).
  • David Cameron, The Social Thought of Rousseau, Burke: A Comparative Study (London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson 1973), x, 242pp.
  • Ruth A. Bevan, Marx and Burke: A Revisionist View (La Salle, Ill: Open Court Pub. Co [1973]), xvi, 197pp.
  • Frank O’Gorman, Edmund Burke: His Political Philosophy (London: Allen & Unwin 1973).
  • Isaac Kramnick, ed., Edmund Burke [Great Lives Observed] (NY: Prentice Hall 1974), ix, 180pp.
  • Isaac Kramnick, The Rage of Edmund Burke: Portrait of an Ambivalent Conservative (NY: Basic Books 1977), xiii, 225pp.
  • Michael Freeman, Edmund Burke and the Critique of Political Radicalism (Oxford: Basil Blackwell 1980), 250pp.
  • Crawford Brough Macpherson, Burke [Past Masters] (Oxford: OUP 1980), 83pp.
  • Stanley Ayling, Edmund Burke: His Life and Opinions (London: John Murray 1988), 316pp.
  • Paul Hindson [with Tim Gray], Burke’s Dramatic Theory of Politics (Aldershot: Avebury [1988]), 192pp.
  • David Musselwhite, ‘Reflections on Burke’s Reflections, 1790-1990’, in Peter Hulme & Ludmilla Jordanova, eds., The Enlightenment and its Shadows (London: Routledge 1990), c.p.126.
  • Peter J. Stanlis, Edmund Burke, the Enlightenment and Revolution, with a foreword by Russell Kirk [Library of Conservative Thought] (NJ: Transaction Publ. 1991), xiii+259pp.
  • David Melding, Edmund Burke and the Foundation of Modern Conservatism (CPC 1991), 21pp.
  • Marilyn Butler, ed., Burke, Paine, Godwin and the Revolution Controversy (Cambridge UP 1984), xii, 260pp.
  • Christopher Reid, Edmund Burke and the Practice of Political Writing (Dublin: Gill & Macmillan 1985), 238pp.
  • Steven Blakemore, ed., Burke and the French Revolution: Bicentennial Essays (Georgia UP 1992) [incl. Tom Furniss, ‘Stripping the Queen: Edmund Burke’s Magic Lantern Show’ [pp.69-96];
  • Frans De Bruyn, ‘Theatre and Counter-theatre in Burke’s Reflections on the Revolution in France’ [pp.26-68], et al.].
  • Frances Ferguson, ‘The Sublime of Edmund Burke, or the Bathos of Experience’ [Chap. 2], and ‘Burke to Kant: A Judgement outside Comparison’ [Chap. 4], in Solitude and the Sublime: Romanticism and the Aesthetics of Individuation (London: Routledge, 1992) [q.pp.];
  • Tom Furniss, Edmund Burke’s Aesthetic Ideology, Language, Gender, and Political Economy in Revolution (Cambridge UP 1993) [q.pp.].
  • W. J. McCormack, ‘Edmund Burke and the Imagination of History’, [2 pts., i.e.:] ‘Anglo Irish Relations’ & ‘The Birth of the Ascendancy’, in Burke to Beckett, Ascendancy Tradition and Betrayal in Literary History (Cork UP 1994) [rev. and enl. edn. of Ascendancy and Tradition, 1985].
  • Stephen K. White, Edmund Burke: Modernity, Politics, and Aesthetics [Modernity and Political Thought] (California & London: Sage Publ. 1994), xx, 97pp., 22cm.
  • Douglas Archibald, ‘Edmund Burke and the Conservative Imagination’, in Eighteenth-Century Ireland: Iris an Dá Chultur (1995), cp.30-38.
  • Nicholas K. Robinson, Edmund Burke: A Life in Caricature (Yale UP 1996), 224pp.
  • E. J. Clery, ‘The Pleasure of Terror: Paradox in Edmund Burke’s Theory of the Sublime’, in Pleasure in the Eighteenth Century, ed. Roy Porter & Marie Mulvey Roberts (Basingstoke: Macmillan 1996), 164-81;
  • Catharine Macaulay, On Burke’s Reflections on the French Revoution, 1790 [Revolution and Romanticism 1789-1834] (Poole: Woodstock Books; Cassell 1996), 95pp.
  • Joseph Priestly, Letters to Burke, 1791 [Revolution and Romanticism 1789-1834] (Poole: Woodstock Books 1996), 152pp.
  • Frederick G. Whelan, Edmund Burke and India: Political Morality and Empire (Pittsburgh UP [1996]), 368pp.
  • Frans de Bruyn, The Literary Genres of Edmund Burke: The Political Uses of Literary Form (OUP 1996), 318pp.
  • Nicholas K. Robinson, Edmund Burke: A Life in Caricature (Yale UP 1996), 214pp.
  • Russell Kirk, Edmund Burke: A Genius Reconsidered ([Wilmington,] Delaware: Intercollegiate Studies Institute 1997), 285pp.
  • Ian Crowe, ed., Edmund Burke: His Life and Legacy (Blackrock: Four Courts 1997), 221pp., and Do. pub. in USA as The Enduring Edmund Burke: Bicentennail Essays [incl. Bruce Frohnen, ‘An Empire of the Peoples’; Jim McCue, Edmund Burke and the British Constitution’, et al.].
  • F[rederick] E.] P. Lock, Edmund Burke, 1730-1784 [Vol. 1 of 2] (Clarendon Press 1998, rep. 2007), xv, 564pp. [see also Vol. 2: 1784-1797 (2006) & joint contents, infra.]
  • Michael J. Franklin, ‘Accessing India: Orientalism, anti-“Indianism” and the rhetoric of Jones and Burke’, in Romanticism and Colonialism: Writing and Empire, 1780–1830, ed. Timothy Fulford & Peter J. Kitson (Cambridge UP 1998),  pp48-66.
  • Vanessa Ryan, ‘The Physiological Sublime: Burke’s Critique of Reason’, in Journal of the History of Ideas, 62, 2 (April 2001), pp.265-79;
  • Elizabeth R. Lambert, Edmund Burke of Beaconsfield Book (Delaware UP; London: AUP 2003), 212pp.
  • Spurgeon Thompson, ‘Edmund Burke’s Reflections on the Revolution in France and the Subject of Eurocentrism’, in Irish University Review (Autumn/Winter 2004), pp.245-62 [infra].
  • Paul Langford, ‘Burke, Edmund (1729/30–1797)’, in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, (OUP Oxford [Sept.] 2004).
  • Yoon Sun Lee, Nationalism and Irony: Burke, Scott and Carlyle (Oxford: OUP 2005), 222pp.
  • Sunil Agnani, ‘Jacobinism in India, Indianism in English Parliament: Fearing the Enlightenment and Colonial Modernity with Edmund Burke’, in Cultural Critique, 68 (Winter 2008), pp.131-62 [available at Muse online].
 

See also J[onathan] C. D. Clark, English Society, 1688-1832: Ideology, Social Structure and Political Practice During the Ancien Regime (Cambridge UP 1985), xiii,442pp. and Do. [rev. edn.], (Cambridge UP 2000), xii, 580pp. [contents] and Clark, The Language of Liberty 1660-1800: Political Discourse and Social Dynamics in the Anglo-American World (Cambridge UP 1993), xviii, 404pp.

See also references in Irish Book Lover, Vols. 4, 6.

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Burke’s Aesthetics (Enquiry): Neal Wood, ‘The Aesthetic Dimension of Burke’s Political Thought’, in The Journal of British Studies, 4, 1 (1964); Samuel Monk, The Sublime: A Study of Critical Theories (Ann Arbor: Michigan UP 1935) and John Barrell, An Equal, Wide Survey (London: Hutchinson 1983); Ross J. S. Hoffman ed., The Wentworth Papers of Burke, Rockingham & Fitzwilliam (Proc. American Philosophical Soc., 94, 1950.)

Incidental Commentary: Edith Mary Johnston, Ireland in the Eighteenth Century (Dublin, 1974); Gary Kelly, The English Jacobin Novel (Oxford, 1976); Albert Souboul, A Short History of the French Revolution, 1789-1799 (California, 1977); David Dickson, New Foundations, Ireland, 1660-1800 (Dublin, 1987); Ferenc Feher, The Frozen Revolution, An Essay on Jacobinism (Cambridge, 1987); François Furet and Mona Ozouf, ed., A Critical Dictionary of the French Revolution (London, 1989); H. T. Mason and W. Doyle, The Impact of the French Revolution on European Consciousness (London, 1989).

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Bibliographical Details
John Morley [1838-1923], Edmund Burke [1879], and Do. [rep. edn.] (Belfast: Athol Press [1993]), 168pp.; 21cm. ‘Reprint of a biography of an aristocratic liberal by a democratic liberal’ [t.p.]; being a rep. of the 1879 edition in Macmillan’ English Men of Letters Ser. - of which other vols. incl. Hume (1878, 1895); Locke (1880, 1888) - with a new introduction by Brendan Clifford. Note: Morley's life of Burke is [...] the biography of one politician and literary man written by another. Each was influential both as a political writer and as a practising politician. Each was a strong party man, and yet each broke with his part at a critical moment on an issue of principle. Burke split the Whig Party because its leaders would not support him in preaching war against the French Revolution. Morley, having held senior Cabinet positions in the governments led by Gladstone, Campbell-Bannerman and Asquith, resigned from Asquith's government in August 1914, after he had failed to dissuade it from making war on Germany. Morley was a major influence in Liberal politics before he entered parliament. As editor of the Fortnightly Review he had tried to develop a coherent and adequate culture of its own for the middle class which had become the dominant class under the Reform Act. This was a continuation of Richard Cobden’s campaign against “feudal” culture in English capitalism. Morley recommended to his readers the French “Enlightenment” writers denounced by Burke. Morley and Burke were antitheses both personally and in what they represented socially. Morley’s biography is neither nostalgia for the old order, nor vituperation against it, but a critical assimilation of Burke into middle class culture. It is the kind of thing which socialist writers failed to do with relation to either Morley or Burke - a failure which rendered British socialist culture brittle, and ready to crumble at the first touch of Thatcherism. Brendan Clifford provides an introduction about Morley and Burke, and a postscript on a recent book on Burke by C. C. O’Brien. A guide to the main personages referred to is also included.’ (See COPAC online.)

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F. P. Lock [Frederick E. P. Lock], Edmund Burke, Vol. 1: 1730-1784 (Clarendon Press 1998, rep. 2007), xv, 564pp. CONTENTS: 1. Growing Up Irish, 1730-1744; 2. From a Boy to a Man, 1744-1750; 3. Getting Started, 1750-1757; 4. A Philosophical Enquiry, 1757; 5. Maps of Mankind, 1756-1765; 6. Journalist and Jackal, 1758-1765; 7. Gleams of Prosperity, 1765-1768; 8. Present Discontents, 1768-1770; 9. Squalls and Stagnation, 1770-1773; 10. America and Bristol, 1774-1776; 11. Waiting on Events, 1776-1779; 12. Shears or Hatchets, 1779-1781; 13. Paradise Lost, 1781-1784.

F. P. Lock, Edmund Burke, Vol. 2: 1784-1797 (Oxford: Clarendon Press 2006), 660pp., ill. [24pp. of pls.] Contents: 1. Picking up the Pieces, 1784-1785; 2. A Pledge Redeemed, 1785-1786; 3. In the Name of the Commons, 1786-1787; 4. A Boundless Object, 1787-1788; 5. Madness and Discord, 1788-1789; 6. The Making of the Reflections, 1789-1790; 7. Reflections on the Revolution in France, 1790; 8. Triumph and Tribulation, 1790-1791; 9. A Uniform Whig, 1791-1792; 10. Chained to an Oar, 1792-1794; 11. A Withered Stump, 1794-1795; 12. An Old Oak, 1795-1796; 13. Sublime and Minute, 1796-1797; Index.

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J[onathan] C. D. Clark, English Society, 1688-1832: Ideology, Social Structure and Political Practice During the Ancien Regime [rev. edn.] (Cambridge UP 2000), xii, 580pp. CONTENTS: ‘The Nature of the Old Order’; ‘From Restoration to Reconciliation, 1660-1760; ‘The Social and Ideological Premises of the Old Order’; ‘National Identity: The Matrix of Church and State, 1760-1815’; ‘Before Radicalism: The Religious Origins of Disaffection, 1688-1800’; ‘The Old Order on the Eve of Its Demise: Slow Erosion’; ‘The End of the Protestant Constitution, 1800-1832: Sudden Collapse’.

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Luke Gibbons, Edmund Burke and Ireland (Cambridge UP 2003), 303pp.: List of illustrations page ix; Preface xi; Introduction: Edmund Burke, Ireland, and the colonial sublime. PART I - THE POLITICS OF PAIN: i] ‘This king of terrors’: Edmund Burke and the aesthetics of executions 21; 2] Philoctetes’ and colonial Ireland: the wounded body as national; narrative 39. PART II - SYMPATHY AND THE SUBLIME: 3] The sympathetic sublime: Edinund Burke, Adam Smith, and the politics of pain 83; 4] Did Edmund Burke cause the Great Famine? Commerce, culture, and colonialism 121. PART III - COLONIALISM AND THE ENLIGHTENMENT: 5] ‘Tranquillity tinged with terror’: the sublime and agrarian insurgency 147; 6] Burke and colonialism: the Enlightenment and cultural diversity 166. PART IV - PROGRESS AND PRIMITIVISM: 7] ‘Subtilized into savages’: Burke, progress, and primitivism 183; 8] ‘The return of the native’: the United Irishmen, culture, and colonialism 208; Conclusion: towards a post-colonial Enlightenment 230; Notes 239; Index 288.

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Death Mask
Death Mask of Burke (1797