Patrick Tuohy

Works

Life
1894-1930; b. 15 N. Frederick St., Dublin; portrait, narrative, and genre painter; ed. CBS and St Enda’s, a first pupil; taught at Metropolitan by Orpen on encouragement of William Pearse, sculptor and school art master [and f. of Patrick Pearse] with whom he studied in 1908; Taylor School, 1912, 1915; 10 ceiling paintings for Jesuit community at Rathfarnham Castle; ceiling for La Scala Theatre, later Capitol Cinema; GPO in 1916; taught in Madrid for 18 months; taught in metropolitan on return in 1918; exhibited RHA “A Mayo Peasant Boy” [painted in 1912, now in Municipal], painting sent to Paris exhibition of Irish art, 1922; ARHA, 1926, and subsequently RHA; ill. books of Standish James O’Grady, landscapes, and portraits of James Stephens, Lord Fingall [Plunkett], and James Joyce; long periods in Paris; moved to Columbia, South Caroline, 1927; settled in New York, where he committed suicide by gas, being found only two weeks later; his works are represented in NGI and Municipal GMA. DIB BREF

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Works
Portraits: Padraic Colum (1924), pencil and crayon; O’Casey (1926), Ria Mooney (1922), both pencil on paper; John Stanislaus Joyce (1923-24), James Joyce (1924) [Buffalo NY], both oil.

Coastal Landscape The Rehearsal The Cockle-pickers (W. Ireland)
Young Girl in an Interior S. J. O'Grady's Coming of Cuchulain (front.) James Augustine Joyce
John Stanislaus Joyce Self-portrait in His Studio with Two Ladies

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Criticism
Patrick J. Murphy, Patrick Tuohy from Conversations with His Friends (Dublin: TownHouse 2004), 206pp.

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Commentary
Arthur Power, Conversations with James Joyce ( London: Millington 1974), pp.104-05: Power describes account of Tuohy’s nervous mania - he believed a rotten tooth was poisoning his brain - as well as his jealousy demeanour towards Joyce who invited him to Paris to paint his family after the success of his portrait of his father. Power gives a second-hand account of Touhy’s time in Georgia where his behaviour towards young women had the effect that ‘no Irishman need come down here for fifty years’, according to his hostess; finally, he recounts his suicide in New York, on hearing of which Joyce said: ‘I’m not surprised. He nearly made me commit suicide too.’

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