T. W. Rolleston (1857-1920)


Life
[Thomas William Hazen Rolleston; T. W. H. Rolleston], b. Shinrone, Co. Offaly [King’s Co.], son of Charles Rolleston-Spunner, QC and later County Court Judge for Tipperary, North Riding, with Elizabeth, dg. of Baron Richards; family home at ffranckfort [Frankfort] Castle, Co. Offaly; ed. Columba’s College, Rathfarnham, TCD, winning Vice-Chancellor’s Prize with “Feast of Belshazzar”; grad. BA 1878; lived in Dresden and travelled on the continent before settling in London;
 
moved to Delgany, Co. Wicklow, 1885; fnd. & ed. Dublin University Review, May 1885-Dec. 1886; contrib. to Academy, Spectator, Kottabos, Boston Pilot, Irish Fireside, &c.; ed. anthology of TCD poets; contrib. two poems in Book of the Rhymers’ Club (1892); contrib. five to Poems and Ballads of Young Ireland, ed. W. B. Yeats (1888), incl. anonymous ded. lines; ed., Prose and Writings of Thomas Davis (1889), emphasising his character as reformed with Theobald Mathew and later Horace Plunkett; also Selections from Plato, and poems of Ellen O’Leary (Lays of Country, Home and Friends, 1891);
 
issued Life of Gotthold Ephraim Lessing (1889); trans. Teachings of Epictetus (1886); trans. Whitman’s Leaves of Grass (1886) into German with Dr. Knortz; trans. Wagner loosely into English; prefaced rep. of Shelley’s Dublin pamphlet (An Address to the Irish People, 1812), 1890; gave Taylorian Lecture, Oxford, on ‘Lessing and the Origins of Modern German Literature’ (1892); first Secretary of Irish Literary Society in London; travelled to Dublin to establish a branch there, but was pre-empted by Yeats (who came to regard him as ‘intimate enemy’ and ‘hollow image’);
 
to sides with Sir Charles Gavan Duffy against Yeats in their dispute over the Irish National Library, and earned the lasting animosity of the poet; issued pamphlet on Ireland, the Empire, and the War (1900); ed. with Stopford Augustus Brooke, A Treasury of Irish Poetry in the English Tongue (1900), introductory notes being provided by W. B. Yeats, Lionel Johnson, Douglas Hyde and George Sigerson; is pro-empire pamphlet of 1901, caused him to be reviled by Arthur Griffith and others as a national apostate; lived at Killiney, Dublin, in 1894.. PI NCBE IF TAY DIW DIL JMC FDA OCIL

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Works
Poetry
  • Sea Sprays, Verses and Translations (Dublin: Maunsel 1909) [from the Irish].
Prose
  • A Life of Gotthold Ephraim Lessing (London: Walter Scott 1889), 218pp., xv, 21, [1]pp.; Do. [facs. rep.] (NY: Kennikat 1972), xv, 21pp. with bibl. [13pp.];
  • Modern Ireland and her Agrarian Problem, trans from German of Moritz Bonn (Dublin: Figgis 1906), 168pp., 8°;
  • The High Deeds of Finn and other Bardic Romances of Ancient Ireland (London: Harrap 1910; NY: T. Y. Crowell 1911) [see details], and Do., [rep. edn. as] The Adventures of Finn Mac Cumhal and Other Stories of Ancient Ireland (Dublin & Cork: Mercier Press 1979) [q.pp.];
  • Myths and Legends of the Celtic Race (London: Harrap; NY: Crowell 1911); Do. [another edn.] (1922), 450pp., 46 ills., and Do., rep. as Celtic Myths and Legends (London: Bracken Books [q.d.]).
Pamphlets
  • Boycotting: A Reply to Mr S. Laing (Dublin: Ponsonby 1888);
  • Ireland’s Vanishing Opportunity (Dublin: Talbot Press 1919), 19pp.
  • Imagination and Art in Gaelic Literature, being notes on some recent translations from the Gaelic (Kilkenny: Library of the Nore 1900; Kilkenny Moderator 1900);
  • Ireland, the Empire, and the War (Dublin: Sealy, Bryers & Walker 1900) [see extract].
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Translations
  • The Encheiridion of Epictetus, trans. from the Greek with preface and notes (London: Kegan Paul & Co. 1881; new. edns. 1888, 1891, 1892, 1900), xxix, 59pp. 8°.;
  • Parsifal; or, the Legend of the Holy Grail. Retold from ancient sources with acknowledgement to the “Parsifal” of Richard Wagner; presented by Willy Pogány. F.P. ((London: G. G. Harrap & Co. 1912), fol.
  • The Tale of Lohengrin, Knight of the Swan: after the drama of Richard Wagner; presented by Willy Pogány. ([1913]), [150]pp., il. [28pp. of pls., some col.; etched by Pogany; ltd. edn. of 525pp.]
  • trans. Tannhäuser [by Richard Wagner], presented by Willy Pogány (London: G. G. Harrap & Co. [1927]), 4°.
Miscellaneous
  • Ed. & intro., Prose Writings of Thomas Davis [Camelot Series] (London: Walter Scott [1890]), xiv, 285pp., 8°;
  • Intro., An Address to the Irish People by Percy Bysshe Shelley, reprinted from the original of 1812; edited by T. J. Wise, with an introduction by T. W. Rolleston (London 1890), 29, 22pp. [8°];
  • trans., The Teaching of Epictetus [Camelot Classics] (London: Walter Scott 1886; Chicago: Donohoe 1892);
  • ed., with Stopford A. Brooke, A Treasury of Irish Poetry in the English Tongue (London: Smith, Elder; NY: Macmillan 1900), and Eo. [rev. edns.] 1915; 1932) [see details];
  • intro., from the Land of Dreams: Irish Poems (Dublin: Talbot Press; London: T. Fisher Unwin: 1918), xxii, 115pp., iv., 8°.;
  • A Philosophical View of Reform [by Percy Bysshe Shelley]; nNow printed for the first time, together with an introduction and appendix by T. W. Rolleston. (London: Humphrey Milford 1920),. xi, 94pp., 4°.
Whitman studies
  • [with Carl Knortz,] Grashalme ... In Auswahl übersetzt von K. Knortz und T. W. Rolleston (Zurich 1899), xii, 180pp. [Whitman’s Leaves of Grass];
  • Horst Frenz, ed., Whitman and Rolleston: A Correspondence [Humanities Series No. 26] (Indiana UP 1951), 137pp.; Do. (Dublin: Browne and Nolan, 1952); and Do. (NY: Kraus Reprint, 1969).
German trans.
  • H. B. Cotterill, [ed.,] Ueber Wordsworth und Walt Whitman (1883) [incls. Rolleston's Whitman];
  • trans. & ed., Because I am a German [by Hermann Fernau], with an introduction by T. W. Rolleston (London: Constable & Co. 1916), 153pp., 8°.
 

See also Charles Wood [mus.], The Dead at Clonmacnois: Song, from the Irish of Enoch O'Gillan by T. W. Rolleston (London: Boosey & Co. [1936)), 4°

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Bibliographical details
High Deeds of Finn and Other Romances of Ancient Ireland, introduced by Stopford A. Brooke (London: Harrap MCMX [1910]), 16 ills. by Stephen Reid; lv, 214pp. Author’s preface expresses debt to translations of the “Finn Cycle” by Standish Hayes O’Grady (Silva Gadelica), A. H. Leahy (Heroic Romances), Whitley Stokes, Kuno Meyer, M. de Arbois de Jubainville (Cycle Mythologique Irlandais, trans. R. I. Best), and makes complimentary reference to Eleanor Hull’s Cuchullain, the Hound of Ulster. The collection omits the ‘Pursuit of Dermot and Grania’ on the grounds that ‘it represents the character of Finn in a light inconsistent with what is said of him elsewhere and partly because it has in it a certain sinister and depressing element which renders it unsuitable for a collection intended largely for the young’ [p.ix, ftn.]. Brooke regards Rolleston’s version of the Finn Cycle as a fulfillment of his own plan for the recasting of Irish epic in modern literary English (for Brooke’s Introduction, see Brooke, infra.)

A Treasury of Irish Poetry in the English Tongue, ed. Stopford A. Brooke & T. W. Rolleston (London; Smith, Elder, & Co. 1900). [For full listing of contents see under Stopford A. Brooke, supra.]

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Criticism
  • Charles Henry Rolleston, Portrait of an Irishman, intro. Stephen Gwynn (London: Methuen 1939);
  • Christina Hunt [Mahony] completed a doctorate on Rolleston (UCD).
 
For W. B. Yeats’s comments on Rolleston, see Douglas Archibald, John Butler Yeats [Irish Writers Series] (Lewisburg: Bucknell UP 1974), p.91. See also Michael McAteer , ‘“Kindness in Your Unkindness”: Lady Gregory and History’, in Irish University Review, Spring/Summer 2004), pp.94-108; espec. 97ff.

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Commentary

W. P. Ryan
W. B. Yeats
James Joyce
Charles H. Rolleston
Frank Tuohy
James Calahan
Nicola Gordon Bowe

W. P. Ryan, The Irish Literary Revival (1894), [On first attending the Southwark Irish Literary Club, W. B. Yeats] offered to enduce Mr T. W. Rolleston and other to throw themselves into the Irish literary movement ... the meeting ... came off at Mr Yeats’s house in Chiswick on the 28th December, 1891 &c [36]. [After the publication of his anthology, Poems and Ballads of Young Ireland, ded. John O’Leary and the Young Ireland Societies] The Poems and Ballads had just appeared, and were taken as indicating a new inspiration in Ireland. Mr Rolleston was in the “black books’ just then, on account of a pamphlet on boycotting, and certain strictures on some aspects of the national movement. Of his lofty ideals, national spirit, and staunch integrity there was no question, but I scarcely think that he had grasped the full nature of the difficulties and harassing circumstances surrounding a less fortunate peasantry’ [50, Rolleston’s bearded photo appears on p.53]. Rolleston, ed. of Dublin University Review, present [at Chiswick House meeting]. [T]o Yeats, unmistakable Irish mystic, he was a curious contrast; [Rolleston takes umbrage at someone’s disparagement of Whitman, whom he has translated into German with Dr. Knortz, 54]. Rolleston proved himself an enthusiast and a capable organiser. It was frequently remarked that he had at length found his proper Irish sphere [56]. [Planned in Gavan Duffy’s New Irish Library series, for 1893, T. W. Rolleston, What Small Nations have Done for Humanity, 70.] T. W. Rolleston, the reading ten years ago of Standish O’Grady’s Heroic Ireland was a turning point in his intellectual career ... came under the spell of Thomas Davis ... some characteristics of the National movement a few years ago alarmed and disturbed him ... certain traits of popular revolution could not fail to excite not perhaps his aversion but his deep regret ... his claim for more tolerance, more education, more Celtic idealism ... in fact, he has made Tone the study of his life ... inspired confidence in all comers ... [involvement in] Irish Industries’ Association ... his culture, insight, and finely-balanced mind [tend to make him] more critical than creative [85-86]. [Discovered Jane Barlow, 146.]

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W. B. Yeats (1) wrote, in the introductory note to his list of “30 Best Irish Books”: ‘As I have no doubt others elsewhere have asked a like question, I send you a list of thirty books, hoping Mr. O’Grady, Mr. Rolleston, Mr. Ashe King, or some other Irish literary man will fill up the gaps.’ (Daily Express, 27 Feb. 1895; Wade, ed., Letters, p.246.)

W. B. Yeats (2): Yeats wrote to John O’Leary, ‘I send you The Second Book of the Rhymers’ Club, in which everybody is tolerably good except the Trinity College men, Rolleston, Todhunter and Green, who are intolerably bad as was to be expected [...]’ (Letters, ed., Wade, p.232; quoted in Denis Donoghue, ed., W. B. Yeats: Memoirs, London; Macmillan 1972, p.37, n.3.)

Yeats to Katherine Tynan: ‘I read out Rolleston’s “Dead at Clonmacnoise” to Edwin Ellis who said it was like “Victor Hugo”.’ (Letter of early May [1888] Letters, Vol. I, ed. John Kelly, OUP 1986, p.65.)

W. B. Yeats (3): ‘This man, T. W. Rolleston, came to be what Russell calls “an intimate enemy”; without passion, though in mind and in body he seemed a vessel shaped for fiery use, I came to think him, in Ben Jonson’s phrase, “a hollow image”. And yet after five and twenty years I continually murmur to myself his lyric, “In the quiet watered land, a land of roses”. He was the true founder of the Irish Literary Society, though the first general idea was mine, understanding all about resolutions and amendments and the like.’ (Memoirs, XIII; given in Richard Finneran [The Complete Poems].)

W. B. Yeats (4) alluded to “Clonmacnoise” in the course of a Senate debate on the Electricity Bill, 1925, dealing with historic monuments, ‘There are many monuments which we should respect and which will become of great improtance to this country, not only to the education of the people, but to the tourists who come here. Therefore, they will be of financial value. There is a famous poem called “Clonmacnoise”, which will be sung by the people of other countries. A poem of the late Mr Rolleston is so beautful that it will in all probability bring many tourists into that district if you can protect the ruins [quotes “In a quiet, watered land [...] Slumber there.’] I think I am the first person to quote a poem in the Seanad. I only do so because I am sure the poem will be, to use the appropriate words, “a definite asset”. (The Senate Speeches of WB Yeats, ed. Donald Pearce, Indiana 1960; Faber 1961), p.89.

W. B. Yeats (5): Louis MacNeice writes of Yeats: ‘Again, he laments that T. W. Rolleston would not canalise his writing into national channels: “He is a fine Greek scholar and quite the handsomest man in Ireland, but I wish he would devote his imagination to some national purpose. Cosmopolitan literature is, at best, but a poor bubble, though a big one. Creative work has always a fatherland.”’ (W. B. Yeats, Faber 1944, p.72.)

[For Yeats’s feelings about Rolleston, see also Douglas Archibald, John Butler Yeats [Irish Writers Series] (Lewisburg: Bucknell UP 1974), p.91.]

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John Eglinton, writing of Thomas Davis in his essay ‘Island of Saints’ (see Saints and Bards, 1906), mentions that ‘Mr T. W. Rolleston has called him “an ideal Irishman”, but that ‘an ideal editor’ is his truer designation. [See Eglinton, infra.]

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James Joyce: ‘“Roilig na Riogh” is utterly lacking in the high distinctive virtue of “The Dead at Clonmacnoise”, and Mr Rolleston, who certainly is not driven along by any poetic impulse, has written a poem because the very failure of the poetic impulse pleases in an epitaph.’ (Review William Rooney, Poems and Ballads; in Daily Express, 11 Dec. 1902; rep. in Critical Writings, ed. Mason & Ellmann, [1959] 1965, p.85.)

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Charles H. Rolleston [RN Commander, ret.], Portrait of An Irishman (1939) - Foreword by Stephen Gwynn. GWYNN on ROLLESTON: ‘his importance was rather as an organising and inspiring personality than as an actual creator; but at least one poem will find a place in every anthology of Irish poetry [“The Dead at Clonmacnoise”] ... an aristocratic nationalist ... regarding the Land War as a vulgar quarrel about rents’. BIOGRAPHY: T. W. Rolleston was son of Charles Rolleston-Spunner, QC (the second name adopted in connection with a legacy), and Elizabeth, dg. of Baron Richards, married c.1832. The family home, ffranckfort [Frankfort] Castle, near which he was born, was built by O’Malley, king of Ormonde, in the 12th century [Kings County/Offaly.] Rolleston associated with Charles Gavan Duffy in an attempt to form a company to circulate Irish literature; he was first Hon. Sec. of the Irish Lit. Society. His address to the Press Club three years after the foundation of the society caused a stir in Irish language revival circles. [Cont.]

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Charles H. Rolleston, Portrait of An Irishman (1939) - reprints T. W. Rolleston’s the address from the Irish Weekly Independent, 1896, ‘[the term] ‘revival a misnomer ... Irish literature, in the sense in which we now use the term, never lived till now. ... In very early days Ireland had a literature in which there were many features of heroic greatness ... another race with another civilisation and another language entered Ireland, made themselves at home there, and in the course of time they too began to produce a literature, written in the English tongue, and having no connection whatever with the stream of Gaelic literature. [...] neither of these literatures were at all adequate as an expression of the best thoughts and feelings of the nation. Education was forbidden to the Gaelic-speaking Irishman and the development of the language was arrested. It remained in a childlike condition ... Anglo-Irish literature on the other hand, powerful as it was in the hands of Swift, profound in those of Berkeley, brilliant in those of Lever, was as incapable as the Gaelic of filling the place of a national literature for Ireland. ... They might defend and champion the Celt - those brilliant Anglo-Irish writers - and they often did so; but it was as Wilberforce championing the West Indian slave; they had little in common with him; they could not share his memories; they could not share his aspirations; the iron of bondage had never entered into his soul [...] These Two streams ... flowed beside each other without intermixing until at last the hour of doom struck for the Gaelic language. [...] (Cont.)

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Charles H. Rolleston, Portrait of An Irishman (1939): ‘For good or ill, English has to be henceforth the medium of expression of our ideas, our feelings, our character, our whole outlook upon the world of nature and the world of Man. ... endeavoring to take up the threads of another literature ..’. Rolleston was soon taken to task for these remarks. Douglas Hyde reports the Press Club controversy from the League standpoint in Myself and the League (1938) [quoted here by C. H. Rolleston], ‘T. W. Rolleston raised a great controversy by a speech which he delivered to the Press club ... the principle thing he said was that it was impossible to employ Irish as a medium of expression for contemporary ideas and contemporary criticism.’ At a meeting of the League Council [specially convened on 1 Feb. 1896], John [Eoin] MacNeill answered every point; Rolleston therewith established a test based on the translation of a passage on crustaceans and others chosen from Herbert Spencer, which Hyde translated into Irish and MacNeill retranslated into English. Rolleston confessed astonishment to find that only one or T. W.o terms had presented difficulties and conceded the issue. T. W. Rolleston was an emphatic and useful supporter of W. B. Yeats, and also a supporter of Sinn Féin in so far as it seemed to him to represent ‘the rise of resistance to clerical domination’.

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Nicola Gordon Bowe, ‘Wilhelmina Geddes, Harry Clarke and their part in the Arts and Crafts Movement of Ireland’, in The Journal of Decorative and Propaganda Arts [DAPA], No. 8 (Miami 1988): ‘The search for a specifically Irish idiom inevitably led to the widespread and often indiscriminate use of Celtic ornament. [Examples at exhibitions of 1988 and 1901] were generally criticised for “lack of good design and sold adherence to old dogmas” ... the same critic noted the lack of application of original thought to the vital element of design and deared that “the faintest breath of the new spirit in art has still to reach” most exhibitors. While there were “any number of tankards that Cuchulainns might have drunk mead from”, there was little cohesive synthesis of form, function, and decoration in useful everyday objects. By 1904 the third, much smaller and predominantly contemporary Irish exhibition reflected advances ....’ (Citing The Studio, Vol. 26, 1902, p.295 (Bowe, pp.2-3.) Matter quoted is from T. W. Rolleston. [Check this source.]

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Frank Tuohy, Yeats (London: Macmillan 1976), Rolleston’s first impressed Yeats by his physical beauty but was soon to prove a ‘hollow image’; in [1892], Rolleston went over to Dublin to found the National Literary Society there; had unfortunate habit of recruiting staunch Unionists, and published tactless suggestion that the London society open branches in ‘England, Ireland, America and the colonies’ (p.72); Yeats later enticed by Rolleston’s attempt to set up splinter group of IRB to be called Irish National Alliance; Yeats again ‘notic[ed] his courteous manners and his beautiful classic face’; after the foundation of the movement with Dr. Mark Ryan presiding, Rolleston deserted (Tuohy, p.87).

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James Cahalan, The Irish Novel: A Critical History (Boston: Twayne Publishers 1988), notes that Moore’s story ‘The Wedding Gown’ was translated into Irish by Tadhg Ó Donnchada and then back into English by T. W. Rolleston, ‘much improved after its bath in Irish’, as Moore said (p.112).

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Quotations
High Deeds of Finn and Other Romances of Ancient Ireland
(London: Harrap MCMX [1910]), 16 ills. by Stephen Reid, introduction by Stopford A. Brooke; lv, 214pp; author’s preface expresses debt to translations of the ‘Finn Cycle’ by Standish Hayes O’Grady (Silva Gadelica), A. H. Leahy (Heroic Romances), Whitley [sic] Stokes, Kuno Meyer, M. de Arbois de Jubainville (Cycle Mythologique Irlandais, trans. R. I. Best), and makes complimentary reference to Eleanor Hull’s Cuchullain, the Hound of Ulster. The collection omits the “Pursuit of Dermot and Grania” on the grounds that ‘it represents the character of Finn in a light inconsistent with what is said of him elsewhere and partly because it has in it a certain sinister and depressing element which renders it unsuitable for a collection intended largely for the young’ [p.ix, ftn.]. Brooke regards Rolleston’s version of the Finn Cycle as a fulfillment of his own plan for the recasting of Irish epic in modern literary English. The volume includes ‘a pronouncing index’ of proper names - using ‘a’ as in father, &c., to equate with Irish (Gaelic) vowel sounds. [Cont.]

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High Deeds of Finn and Other Romances of Ancient Ireland (1910) - “Quest of the Sons of Turenn”: ‘[...] With that the Sons of Mochaen and the Sons of Turenn rushed fiercely upon each other. Long and sore was the strife that they had, and the blood that fell made red the grassy place wherein they fought. Not one of them but received wounds that pierced him through and through, and that heroes of less hardihood had died of a score of times. But in the end the sons of Mochaen fell, and Brian, Inchar, and Incharba lay over them in a swoon.’

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Myths and Legends of the Celtic Race (1911): ‘In the Ultonian Cycle it will have been noticed that however extravagantly the supernatural element may be employed, the final significance of almost every tale, the end to which all the supernatural machinery is worked, is something real and human, something that has to do with the virtues and vices, the passions or the duties of men and women. In the Ossianic cycle, broadly speaking, this is not so. The nobler vein of literature seems to have been exhausted, and we have now beauty for the sake of beauty, romance for the sake of romance, horror or mystery for the sake of the excitement they arouse.’ (p.254; quoted in Michael McAteer , ‘“Kindness in Your Unkindness”: Lady Gregory and History’, in Irish University Review, Spring/Summer 2004, p.97.)

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The Dead at Clonmacnoise”: ‘In a quiet, watered land, a land of roses,/Stands St. Kiernan’s city fair:/And the warriors of Erin, in their famous generations/Slumber there.// There beneath the dewy hillside sleep the noblest/Of the clan of Conn,/Each below his stone with name in branching Ogham/And the sacred knot thereon. // There they laid to rest the seven kings of Tara, / There the sons of Cairbre sleep - / Battle-banners of the Gael that in Kieran’s plain of crosses / Now their final hosting keep. // and in clonmacnoise they laid the men of Teffia, / And right many a lord of Breagh; / Deep the sod above Clan Creide and Clan Connaill /Kind in hall and fierce in fray. // Many and many a son of Conn, the Hundred-Fighter, / In the red earth lies at rest; / Many a blue eye of Clan Colman the turf covers, / Many a swan-white breast.’

[Cf. var. punct. in Frank Tuohy, Yeats: An Illustrated Biography (Macmillan 1976), p.42: ‘water’d’; ‘fair’; ‘Slumber there ...’; continuing, ‘Many and many a son of Conn, the Hundred Fighter, / In the red earth lies at rest; / Many a blue eye of Clan Colman the turf covers, / Many a swan-white breast.’ ]

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The Grave of Rury”: ‘Clear as air, the western waters / Evermore their sweet, unchanging song / Murmur in their stony channels / Round O’Connor's sepulchre in Cong. / Crownless, hopeless, here he lingered; / Year on year went by him like a dream, / While the far-off roar of conquest / Murmured faintly like the singing stream. / Here he died and here they tombed him / Men of Fechin chanting round his grave. / Did they know, ah! did they know it, / What they buried by the babbling wave. / Now above the sleep of Rury / Holy things and great have passed away; / Stone by stone the stately abbey / Falls and fades in passionless decay. / Darkly grows the quiet ivy, / Pale the broken arches glimmer through; / Dark upon the cloister-garden / Dreams the shadow of the ancient yew. / Through the leafless aisles the verdure / Flows, the meadow-sweet and fox-glove bloom / Earth, the mother and consoler, / Winds soft arms about the lonely tomb. Peace and holy gloom possess him, / Last of Gaelic monarchs of the Gael, / Slumbering by the young, eternal / River voices of the western vale.’

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D. P. Moran: Rolleston accuses Moran of ‘going back I know not how many generations to the dismal conception of an Ireland divided into watertight compartments, with a separate religion in each, and no common thought, no national sentiment among them all. You cannot build a nation that way, nor a literature either.’ (The Leader, 5 Jan. 1901; FDA2, p.973; cited in Edna Longley, The Living Stream, 1994, p.17.)

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References
Justin McCarthy, ed., Irish Literature (Washington: Catholic Univ. of America 1904), selects “On the Colloquy of the Ancients” from Lecture on Imagination and Art in Gaelic Literature”; also “The Dead at Clonmacnoise”, “The Last Desire”, “To My Bicycle”, and other poems.

Irish Book Lover: There are recurrent allusions to Rolleston in the Irish Book Lover, Vols. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 11, 13 & 20.

D. J. O’Donoghue, Poets of Ireland: A Biographical and Bibliographical Dictionary of Irish Writers of English Verse (Dublin: Hodges Figgis & Co. 1912), tentatively attributes the occasional pseudonym ‘Kendal’ to him.

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Stephen Brown, Ireland in Fiction [Pt. I] (Dublin: Maunsel 1919) lists Myths and Legends of the Celtic Race (1911) and The High Deeds of Finn (1910).

Arthur Quiller Couch, ed., Oxford Book of English Verse, 1250-1918 (new ed. 1929), gives “Clonmacnoise” (p.866).

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Geoffrey Taylor, ed., Dublin Book of Verse [1909], gives biog.: 1857-1920, b Shinrone, son of a judge; ed. St. Columba’s and TCD; lived on the Continent; only good verse is ‘The Dead at Clonmacnoise’, which Taylor calls the best poem of the 19th c. O’Connor quotes ‘The Dead at Clonmacnoise’ (Book of Ireland, 1979).

Frank O’Connor, A Book of Ireland (London: Collins 1959), selected “The Dead at Clonmacnoise” (p.50) and “The Grave of Rury” (pp.51-52). O’Connor remarks that Rory O’Connor, the subject of the latter, was actually buried at Clonmacnoise, not Cong.

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Seamus Deane, gen. ed., The Field Day Anthology of Irish Writing (Derry: Field Day 1991), Vol. 2 selects from Sea Spray, Verses and Translations, ‘The Dead at Clonmacnoise’; also Rolleston’s defence of the Treasury of Irish Poetry, and especially its preface by Stopford Brooke [also printed], in an exchange with D. P. Moran of The Leader, beginning with an editorial of 5 Jan. 1901, followed by Rolleston’s reply, 5 Jan. 1901. [969-975]. [BIOG, 779]

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Bibliographical sources
British Library lists [1] Modern Ireland and her Agrarian Problem [...] translated [...] by T. W. Rolleston.. 168pp. Hodges, Figgis & Co.: Dublin, 1906. 8o.[2] A Treasury of Irish Poetry in the English tongue. Edited by S. A. Brooke and T. W. Rolleston.. xliiipp. 578. Smith, Elder & Co.: London, 1900. 8o. [3] Prose Writings of Thomas Davis. Edited, with an introduction, by T. W. Rolleston.. xiv, 285pp. Walter Scott: London, [1890.] 8o. [4] Thomas Davis. Selections from his prose and poetry. Introduction by T. W. Rolleston. With a portrait and other illustrations.. xiv, 367pp. Gresham Publishing Co.: London, [1910?] 8o. [5] The Encheiridion of Epictetus. Translated from the Greek, with preface and notes, by T. W. H. Rolleston. xxix, 59pp. Kegan Paul & Co.: London, 1881. 8o. [6] The Teaching of Epictetus: being the ‘Encheiridion of Epictetus,’ with selections from the ‘Dissertations’ and ‘Fragments.’ Translated from the Greek, with introduction and notes, by T. W. Rolleston.. xxxix, 222pp. 1888. [7] The Teaching of Epictetus. Being the ‘Encheiridion of Epictetus’ with selections from the ‘Dissertations’ and ‘Fragments.’ Translated [...] with introduction and notes, by T. W. Rolleston.. xxxix, 222pp. 1891. [8] Because I am a German [...] Edited with an introduction by T. W. Rolleston.. 153pp. Constable & Co.: London, 1916. 8o. [9] Irland och Polen. [By T. W. H. Rolleston.] Översättning fran Engelskan.. 24pp. Stockholm, 1917. 8o. [10] An Address to the Irish People, by P. B. Shelley. Reprinted from the original edition of 1812. Edited by T. J. Wise, with an introduction by T. W. Rolleston. 29, 22pp. London, 1890. 8o. [11] Lays of Country, Home and Friends. (Poems of Arthur O’Leary.) [With an introduction by T. W. H. Rolleston.]. xxxi, 100pp. Sealy, Bryers & Walker: Dublin, 1891. 8o. [12] Selections from Plato, from the translation of Sydenham and Taylor. Revised and edited by T. W. Rolleston. Including portions of the “Phaedrus,” the “Republic,” “Greater Hippias” and the “Banquet,” together with the “Apology of Socrates,” the “Crito,” the “Phaedo” and the Seventh Epistle of Plato.. xxxii, 281pp. [1892.] [13] Portrait of an Irishman. A biographical sketch of T. W. Rolleston [...] 14 plates [including portraits].. xv, 189pp. Methuen & Co.: London, 1939. 8o. [14] Deirdre: the Feis Ceoil prize cantata, Dublin, 1897, etc.. 17pp. P. Geddes & Co.: Edinburgh, [1897.] 8o. [15] Imagination and Art in Gaelic Literature, being notes on some recent translations from the Gaelic. A lecture delivered [...] on February 16th, 1900.. 32pp. [1900.] [16] Ireland and Poland. A comparison. London: T. Fisher Unwin, 1917. 21p; 22cm [17] Ireland and Poland. A comparison.. 14pp. G. H. Doran Co.: New York, 1917. 8o. [18] Ireland’s Vanishing Opportunity.. 19pp. Talbot Press: Dublin; T. Fisher Unwin: London, 1919. 8o. [19] Lessing and Modern German Literature. [20] Thomas William Hazen Rolleston, Letters to Walt Whitman. With a portrait. Indiana University Publications. Humanities Series. no. 26. [21] Life of G. E. Lessing (Bibliography by J. P. Anderson.). 218, xvpp. 1889. [22] Life of Gotthold Ephraim Lessing.. Port Washington, London: Kennikat Press, 1972. ISBN 0 8046 1609 4 218, xv p. 21 cm. bibl. i-xiv [...]. [23]pp. Myths & Legends of the Celtic Race [...] With sixty-four full-page illustrations.. 456pp. George G. Harrap & Co.: London, 1911. 8o. [24] Parallel Paths: a study in biology, ethics, and art.. xv, 299pp. Duckworth & Co.: London, 1908. 8o. [25] Parsifal; or, the Legend of the Holy Grail. Retold from ancient sources with acknowledgement to the “Parsifal” of Richard Wagner by T. W. Rolleston. Presented by Willy Pogány. F.P.. Harrap & Co.: London, 1912. fol. [26] Sea Spray. Verses and translations.. 64pp. Maunsel & Co.: Dublin, 1909. 8o. [27] The High Deeds of Finn, and other Bardic romances of ancient Ireland [...] With an introduction by Stopford A. Brooke [...] and with sixteen illustrations by Stephen Reid.. lv, 214pp. George G. Harrap & Co.: London, 1910. 8o. [28] Three Love Tales after Richard Wagner. Tannhäuser, Lohengrin, Parsifal. [In verse.]. xv, 127pp. G. G. Harrap & Co.: London, 1920. 8o. [29] Walt Whitman. [By T. W. Rolleston.] [30] A Philosophical View of Reform [...] Now printed for the first time. Together with an introduction and appendix by T. W. Rolleston.. xi, 94pp. Humphrey Milford: London, 1920. 4o. [31] From the Land of Dreams (Irish poems.) [...] With an introduction by T. W. Rolleston.. xxii, 115pp., iv. Talbot Press: Dublin; T. Fisher Unwin: London, 1918. 8o [...]. [32] Tannhäuser [...] Freely translated in poetic narrative form by T. W. Rolleston. Presented by Willy Pogány.. G. G. Harrap & Co.: London, [1911.] 8o. [33] Tannhäuser [...] Translated [...] by T. W. Rolleston. Presented by Willy Pogány.. G. G. Harrap & Co.: London, [1927.] 4o. [34] The Tale of Lohengrin, Knight of the Swan, after the drama of Richard Wagner. By T. W. Rolleston. Presented by Willy Pogany. (Etched plate [...] by W. Pogany.). G. G. Harrap & Co.: London, [1913.] 8o. [35] Grashalme [...] In Auswahl übersetzt von K. Knortz und T. W. Rolleston.. xii, 180pp. Zürich, 1889. 8o.

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James Carty, MA, Asst. Librarian, National Library of Ireland, Bibliography of Irish History 1870-1911 (Dublin: Stationary Office [1937], 1940), lists Boycotting: A Reply to Mr. S. Laing (Dublin: Ponsonby 1888), 15pp., and Ireland, the Empire, and the War (Dublin: Sealy, Bryers & Walker 1900), 24pp. [pamphs.]

Belfast Linenhall Library lists Myths and Legends of the Celtic Race; see also Lyra Celtica. Belfast Central Public Library holds High Deeds of Finn (1910, 1934); Myths and Legions of the Celtic Race (1918); Sea Spray (1909).

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Notes
Charles Hubert Oldham, TCD don in whose rooms the policy of the new Dublin University Review, ed. by T. W. Rolleston, was discussed (See A. N. Jeffares, Yeats, A New Life (1988), p.21; p.70, &c., for this, and for an account of the fracas [with Charles Gavan Duffy] over the Irish Library.

Charles Henry Rolleston, the author of Portrait of an Irishman (London: Methuen 1939), appears with his sister Thea and W. B. Yeats in a photo taken in [T. W.] Rolleston’s garden in Killiney in 1894; rep. in Tuohy, (Yeats: An Illustrated Biography, Macmillan 1976, p.74).

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