Pamela Hinkson (1900-82)


Life
[pseud. ‘Peter Deane’;] b. London, dg. of Katharine Hinkson-Tynan; moved to Ireland when her father was appointed magistrate in Mayo; ed. priv. in Ireland and later in Germany and France; journalist; worked for British Ministry of Information in Germany; wrote Great War fiction as ‘Peter Deane’; moved to England after father’s death in 1919; lectured in US and India; successful with The Ladies’ Road (1932), which ends with the burning of an Anglo-Irish house (‘That night Cappagh lit a torch for the countryside’);
 
ghost-wrote Seventy Years Young (1937), the autobiography of Lady Fingall; issued Irish Gold (1939); Indian Harvest (q.d.) followed visit to the Viceroy in the 1930s; issued The Light on Ireland (1935); lecture tours in USA for Brit. Min. of Information during WWII; The Deeply Rooted (1934) [DIB]; Golden Rose (1944); The Lonely Bride (1951). The Ladies of the Road sold 100,000 copies in Penguin, 1932; d. in Ireland. IF2 DIW DIB ATT

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Works
[Selected:] The End of All Dreams (First Novel Library 1923); The Girls at Redlands (London: Partridge 1923), girl’s school story; Patsy at School (London: Nelson 1925); St Mary’s (London: Longmans 1927); Schooldays at Meadowfield (London & Glasgow: Collins 1930); Ladies of the Road (London: Gollancz 1932; NY: Penguin 1946), The Deeply Rooted (London: Gollancz 1935); Ireland (London: Muller 1935), 91pp.; Irish Gold (London: Collins 1939), sketches; Indian Harvest (London: Collins 1941). Golden Rose (London: Collins 1951); The Lonely Bride (London: Collins 1951).

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References
Desmond Clarke, Ireland in Fiction: A Guide to Irish Novels, Tales, Romances and Folklore [Pt. 2] (Cork: Royal Carbery 1985), gives details: b. London, novelist and critic. dg. of Katherine and H.A.H.; lists The End of All Dreams (1923), The Ladies of the Road (1932), The Deeply Rooted (1938) [sic], The Lonely Bride (1951) [chronicle of big house family 1890-1921; Ann Burke makes suitable marriage; Land League disturbances; sons lost in World War; money is scarce; natives more or less ragged and unkempt, but viewpoint not without sympathy]. These are all Big House novels, viewing Irish society from that standpoint, and focussing on the pains of loss and dissolution of that class. Irish episodes are ‘related with intense poignancy’.

Bernard Share, ed., Far Green Fields, 1500 Years of Irish Travel Writing (Blackstaff 1992), includes extract from Pamela Hinkson, Indian Harvest (Collins 1941).

Cathach Books (1996/97) lists The Light on [sic] Ireland (London: Muller 1935), 91pp.

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Notes
Stephen Gwynn, Irish Literature and Drama (1936) [pref.], writes: Pamela Hinkson ... inherits all her mother’s charm of style and sense of beauty [...]

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