Philip Dixon Hardy

Works


Life
1794-1875; bookseller, printer, publisher, poet; ed. TCD, BA 1847; introduced steam printing in Ireland, 1833; ed. Dublin Penny Journal from 1833 (acc. Hayley, 1987); also ed. Dublin Literary Gazette [later National Magazine]; issued numerous religico-polemical works, and tourist guides, as well as some collections of poetry, The Friend of Ireland, containing an exposure of errors and superstitions of the Church of Rome [vols. 1-10] (1838-39); The Northern Cottage, or The Effects of Bible Reading (1842);
 
issued The Inquisition (1849); The Maynooth Grant considered religiously, morally, and politically (1853); also poetry, Wellington (1814); Bertha, a Tale of Erin (1817); A Wreath from the Emerald Isle (1826); The Pleasures of Religion and Other Poems (1869) [sic DIH]; and works of travel, The Northern Tourist (1820), The New Picture of Dublin (1831), The Holy Wells of Ireland (1836), and Hardy’s Tourists’ Guides through Ireland, In Four Tours (1858). IF RAF DIH

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Works
Journalism
  • ‘Ireland viewed in its past and present state’, Dublin Literary Gazette, Vol. III, Feb. 1831, pp.129-30;
 

ed., Pic Nics from the “Dublin Penny Journal”, Being a Selection from the Legends, Tales, and Stories of Ireland, which have Appeared in the Published Volumes of the Dublin Penny Journal, illustrated with ten characteristic engravings by Mr. B. Clayton, Jun. (Dublin: Philip Dixon Hardy, Cecila Street. W. F. Wakeman, D'Olier Street. London: Richard Groombridge, Panyer Alley, Paternoster Row, 1836), vi, 328pp., ill. 16°. [cloth 7s. 6d.] first noticed April 1836; copies held in 6 libraries incl. BL and TCD Lib. Frontispiece with scene from one narrative facing t.p. with vignette. Dedication, pp.[v]–vi, to ‘Sir William Betham, F.S.A. L.S. M.R.I.A. R.A.S. Z.S. Ulster King of Arms of all Ireland, &c. &c.’, signed ‘Philip Dixon Hardy’ and dated ‘37. Stephen’s Green, March 28, 1836’. 1p. list of contents precedes main text. CONTENTS: “Darby Doyle’s Voyage to Quebec” (signed “T. E.” and dated ‘Upper Canada, Oct. 4, 1832’), pp.[1]–18; “Reminiscences of a Rockite” (signed “M’C.”), pp.[19]–63; “The Pooka” (signed “E. W.”), pp.[64]–77; “Meelan; a Legend of the South. By Edward Walsh” [poetry], pp.[78]–87; “The Dreamers. Founded on Fact” (signed “J. L. L.”), pp.[88]–109; “The Smugglers” (signed “Tim. Simkins”), pp.[110]–133; “Hie over to England” (signed “W. B.’, running title reads: “Shaun Long and the Fairies”), pp.[134]–148; “Ellen Duncan” (signed “Denis O’Donoho”), pp.[149]–174; “Murtough Odge, the Outlaw’, pp.[175]–187; “The Abduction of a Voter” (signed “Denis O’Donoho”), pp.[188]–215; “The Leprawhaun” (signed “J. L. L.”), pp.[216]–232; “The Unforgiven”, pp.[232]–244; “The Red Spirit” (signed “Iota”), pp.[245]–259; “Paddy Doyle’s First Trip to Cork” (signed “E. W.” and dated “Shandangin, May 1833”), pp.[260]–273; “Pether Brierly’s Inn Adventure” (signed “Denis O’Donoho”), pp.[274]–280; “The Pattern of the Lough” (signed “J. L. L.”), pp.[290]–309; “The Banshee” (signed “J. L. L.”), pp.[310]–328. Further edns: as Legends, Tales, and Stories of Ireland: Illustrated with Ten Characteristic Engravings (1837).

 

References
Stephen Brown, Ireland in Fiction: A Guide to Irish Novels, Tales, Romances and Folklore [Pt. I] (Dublin: Maunsel 1919), cites Legends, Tales and Stories of Ireland (Dublin 1837); Essays and Sketches of Irish Life and Character; also , Ireland in 1846-47 considered in reference to the rapid growth of Popery, and works on topography; tends to stage Irishry.

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Patrick Rafroidi, Irish Literature in English: The Romantic Period, 1789-1850 (Gerrards Cross: Colin Smythe 1980), gives bio-details: ran Dublin Penny Journal, and The National Magazine; works, Wellington, 3 cantos (1814); Bertha, a Tale of Erin, 6 cantos (1824); The Pleasures of Piety, poem (1827); also anthologies, The Harp of Zion, collection of Protestant hymns; Legends, Tales and Stories of Ireland (1837); Brown attributes to him Essays and Sketches of Irish Life and Character, and Ireland in 1846-7, considered in reference to the rapid growth of Popery, and topographical works.

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Barbara Hayley, ‘A Reading and Thinking Nation: Periodicals as the Voice of Nineteenth-century Ireland’, in Three Hundred Years of Irish Periodicals, ed. Hayley & Enda McKay (Assoc. of Irish Learned Journals: Gigginstown, Mullingar 1987), pp.29-48, gives an account of Hardy’s editorship of the Dublin Literary Gazette, which he commenced with intention of standing above party, though tending to write articles defending the Penal Laws - viz.: ‘Never were severe laws more mercifully administered; never was honour, humanity, and pity for a proscribed religion and people more tenderly exhibited.’ (‘Ireland viewed in its past and present state’, Dublin Literary Gazette, Vol. III, Feb. 1831, pp.129-30; cited in Hayley, op. cit., p.34.)

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Hyland Books (Cat. 214) lists Tourist’s Guide, 3rd Tour, Lakes of Killarney, Cork, &c. (1st ed. 1859), maps. ills.

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Notes
National Magazine: Samuel Lover’s uncle Charles Lover, edited the National Magazine up to 1830 when he handed it over to Philip Dixon Hardy shortly before the journal expired in 1831. (See Barbara Hayley, ‘Irish Periodicals’, in Anglo-Irish Studies, ii (1976) [pp.83-108], p.91.) Further, Philip Dixon Hardy claimed a loss of £250 on the National Magazine, in addition to the £400 lost by the previous proprietors, and losses of £1,000 and £2,000 are reported on penny magazines, and quarterly journals alike (idem.)

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