Hugh Gough [Sir] (1779-1869)

Extracts from criticismMiscellaneous information


Life
[Field-Marshall Hugh Viscount Gough]; adj. of Col. Rochfort’s Foot (119th), 1794; capture of Cape with 78th Highlanders, 1795; commander of 2nd Batt. at Talavera, 1809 and wounded; lieut.-col.; distinguished at Barossa and Tarifa, 1881; wounded at Nivelle, 1813; knighted and given freedom of Dublin, 1815; major-gen., 1830; KCB, 1831; captured Canton forts, 1841; GCB;
 
created baronet for services in China, 1842; comm.-in-chief for India and defeated Mahrattas, 1843; conducted First Sikh War with successful battles of Mudki, 1845, Ferozeshah and Sobraon, both 1846; created Baron Gough; conducted second Sikh War, 1848, with closing battle at Goojerat, 21 Feb. 1849, leading to annexation of the Punjab; created Viscount; freedom of City of London with pension; general, 1854; KP, 1857; privy councillor, 1859; GCSI, 1861;
 
field-marshal, 1862; d. at his home, St. Helen’s [formerly Seaview], Merrion Rd., Co. Dublin [now a Radisson S.A.S. hotel]; bur. with his wife at St. Brigid’s, Stillorgan; commemorated with an equestrian statue commissioned from John Foley by Dublin Corporation for the Phoenix Park, Dublin (unveiled 21 Feb. 1880) and blown up by the IRA in 1957 and ultimately removed to Chillingham Castle, Northumberland, and restored. ODNB

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Commentary
Ronan Sheehan, Foley’s Asia (Dublin: Lilliput Press 1999) gives an account of Gough’s campaigns at Barossa with the 87th (attributing him with the cry, “Faugh a beallagh!” and “Eirigi .. rise up!”), Mahrajpore (where he loses 790 men and professes to his critics, “I will never be bate”; p.21.), Moodkee [sic], Ferozeshah (“I’ll wipe the Sakes [Sikhs] off de face of de earth”), Gujerat, &c. Quotes Sir John Mitchel, commanding the troops in Ireland: ‘Honoured I have been by the temporary deposit in my hands of this memorial of glory. I now surrender it to the safeguard of Ireland’s sons. Keep it, Irishmen, as an everlasting momento of your glory. Treasure it as a sacred deposit. Glory in it as the statue of one who was an honour to your country, one whose whole life, whetehr civil or military, was one continued career of kindness, konour, honesty of purpose, combined with the purest loyalty and the most enthusiastic patriotism. He was loved and honoured by his countrymen. He was par excellence our Irish chevalier, sans peur et sans reproche, and to wind up all, he was the heart and soul of an Irishman.’ (p.25.)

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Notes
Kith & Kin?: John Gough (1721-1791) was master of the Friends’s School, Dublin, 1752-74 and afterwards at Lisburn; published a History of the People Called Quakers (1789-90), and a tract on non-payment of [Anglican] tithes. (See ODNB.)

Namesake: [Hugh] Gough was among those who contributed to the expense of acquiring Corot's “Marseilles” for the Hugh Lane Collection (see Municipal Gallery, Dublin; Hugh Lane Gift, an exhibition of 2008.)

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