Oliver Goldsmith: 1728-1774


Life

1728: b. 10 Nov., Pallasmore [Pallas], Forgney, Co. Longford (or poss. Ardnagowan near Elphin); a forebear called John Goldsmith was rector of Bourishoull, Co., Mayo, in 1641 and narrowly escaped death in the rebellion [‘Popish massacre’]; Oliver was 2nd son of a poor Anglican clergyman, and Anne Jones, dg. of Oliver Jones, of Smith Hill House, who was head of diocesan school at Elphin; had a br. Charles, who later followed him to London; the family moved to Lissoy on his father receiving the living of Kilkenny West, nr. Ballymahon, Co. Westmeath, 1730; ed. Lissoy [autograph var. Lishoy], under Thomas Byrne, and diocesan school of Elphin, Co. Roscommon; also briefly at Athlone, and later at Edgeworthstown under Rev. Patrick Hughes; contracts smallpox; enters TCD as a sizar, 11 June, 1745 [var. 1744], his tutor being Theaker Wilder, a mathematician; attends plays at Royal Theatre and neglects studies; falls to bottom of his class in theology and law; suffers death of his father 1747, after which the house at Lissoy passed to Mr. Hudson, married to OG's sister Catherine; his mother settles at Ballymahon, in straightened circumstances; his br. Henry became curate in his father’s former living, taught school, living at Pallas - establishing a happy family and a reputation for kindness; OG put under the charge of an uncle, Contarine; makes money by selling songs to Hicks for printing [vide Colm Ó Lochlainn, More Irish Street Ballads, 1965]; friendship with college friend Robert Bryanton, the scion of Ballymulvey House, led to frolics in neighbourhood of Ballymahon;

 
wins college prize, and riots with the money by conducting a party with town women in his rooms; knocked down by his tutor, Wilder, and quits college; his re-entrance to college secured by his br. Henry, then already in orders; formally admonished in connection with the Black Dog riot, which left two townspeople dead and resulting the explusion of four students; grad. 27 BA Feb. 1749 [O.C. - vars. 1748; 1750, Swarbrick, ed.]; sets out walking to Cork with view to emigration, but turns back for Lissoy after three days, 1749; suffered a rift with his mother (‘I have a sneaking fondness for her still’); rejected for Holy Orders by Bishop of Elphin because of inappropriateness of his dress (red breeches), 1751; supplied with £50 by an uncle to study law in London (Inner Temple) but loses it on cards in Dublin; goes to Edinburgh to study medicine, again supported by his uncle, Sept. 1752-Feb. 1753; attends soirées of Duke of Hamilton and is regarded as ‘the facetious Irishman’; imprisoned Newcastle on suspicion of recruiting for French;
 
1755: OG travels to continent and remains at Leyden until 1755; wanders in France, Switzerland, and Italy, 1755-56 (‘remote, unfriended, melancholy, slow’); perhaps becomes MD at Louvain or Padua; visits Voltaire at Lausanne; returns to England, arriving at Dover, 1 Feb. 1756; reaches London destitute; sets up as physician in Southwark, and takes teaching work at Dr. Milner’s school at Peckham; there he meets the publisher Ralph Griffiths and commences writing for the Monthly Review, 1757, producing more than 90 notices, including a review of Burke’s Philosophical inquiry ... into the sublime and beautiful; seeks employment as surgeon’s mate in the Royal Navy, and found not qualifed at examination, 21 Dec. 1758; OG parts with Griffiths after seven months, accusing him of ‘falsifying’ his writing, 1759; engaged by Smollett on British Magazine, 1759; issues first independent work, Memoirs of a Protestant, condemned to the Galleys of France, for his Religion, a translation; fails to qualify for med. post in India Company, 1758; issues Enquiry into the Present State of Polite Learning (April 1759), makes acquaintance with Bishop Thomas Percy of Reliques fame, who would later write Memoir of Goldsmith (1801); OG writes short life of Bishop Berkeley, replete with Irish anecdote (1759); contribs. to Critical Review et al.; contribs. article on Carolan to British Magazine (July 1760);
 
1760: encounters John Newbery and worked for him on the Public Ledger, his first piece appearing 12 Jan. 1760; OG occupies upper room in Newbury’s home, Canonbury House, Islington at times during 1760-69; 123 “Chinese Letters” published in the Public Ledger, 1760-62, later collected as Citizen of the World; or Letters from a Chinese Philosopher residing in London to his Friends in the East (1762) and containing the characters Beau Tibbs, Mrs Tibbs, and ‘the Man in Black’, a self-portrait [1761]; moves from Green Arbour Court to better rooms at Wine Office Court, Fleet St.; becomes acquainted with Garrick, Murphy, Smart, Bickerstaff, and a member of Johnson’s Club, 1760; entertains a party incl. Percy and Johnson, 31 May 1761; writes abridgement of Voltaire (1761); writes a Life of Beau Nash (1762); experiences illness and visits spas, 1763; first meets Boswell, who disparaged him in his Life of Johnson, 1763; issued History of England in a Series of Letters from a Nobleman to his Son (1764), anonymously published and attributed on style to Chesterfield, Lord Orrery, and Lord Lyttleton [var. Aug. 1771 CAB]; secures patronage of Lord Clare with his Traveller, or a Prospect of Society (Dec. 1764), the first work to appear under his own name, and compared by Johnson to work of Pope; receives 20 for the poem, which Newbery sold through numerous editions; moves from Wine Court to the Temple; reputedly wrote Goody Two Shoes;
 
1765: an edition of his collected essays printed in 1765; enters dispute with a chemist over a prescription, being ejected from the house of a lady he had offered to help as a physician, 1765; Boswell reports that Johnson visited him in poverty and removes the manuscript of The Vicar of Wakefield for sale; known to have been purchased by Newbery with Collins and another, for 21 on 21 Oct. 1762, the copyright being sold to Francis Newbery, nephew of John, at a profit of 63; not published until 1766 (96th edn. 1889), probably in view of sale of The Traveller; Vicar of Wakefield quickly running to three editions during 1766, the fourth edn. starting at a loss; wrote a short English grammar for five guineas; wrote History of Rome (1769) [var. Roman History], for booksellers; death of Newbery, 1767;
 
1767: The Goodnatur’d Man rejected by Garrick in favour of a comedy by Hugh Kelly, 1767, and then taken up by Colman to be performed at Covent Garden, 1768, with a gloomy prologue by Johnson who attended the rehearsals as an encouragement; ran for ten nights only; printed with a Preface attacking the fashion for sentimental drama or ‘genteel comedy’, supposedly by Goldsmith himself but probably by Arthur Murphy; used proceeds, c.500, from play and publication, to move to newly-furnished chambers; occupied cottage on Edgeware Rd., returning in October; published History of Rome (May 1769); issued The Deserted Village (26 May 1770), running to a fifth edition by August; issued Life of Parnell (1770); travelled to Paris with the Horneck family (Mrs Horneck, Mary, and Catherine, 1770, Mary, whom he met at 14, being his ‘Jessamy Bride’ (later m. H. W. Bunbury); writes The Haunch of Venison, a poetical epistle to Lord Clare (publ. posthum 1776), in return for a gift of Lord Clare; agreed with Davies to write a Life of Bolingbroke (Dec. 1770);
 
1773: published anonymously “An Essay on the Theatre; or, A Comparison between the Laughing and Sentimental Comedy in Westminster Gazette (Jan. 1773, pp.4-6), criticising the latter; increasingly plunged in death through expensive living; She Stoops to Conquer (Covent Garden, March 1773), a tale of ‘mistakes of the night’ concerning class confusions, and produced after interventions by Johnson; altercation with Thomas Evans and the editor of The London Packet, in which appeared ‘Tom Tickle’, an insulting letter mocking his tender feelings for ‘the lovely H-k’;
1774: publishes The Retaliation (1774), containing celebrated lines on Burke, Garrick, Cumberland, et al.; The History of Greece (1774); An History of the Earth and Animated Nature, 8 vols. (posthum. 1774), commissioned 1769, and paided for long before delivery, often ridiculed for its preposterous inventions; removed to country lodgings nr. Hyde to write and recoup his fortune; returned ill to London; embarked on “The Retaliation”, and is writing of Reynolds (‘by flattery unspoiled’) at the time when he suffers his final attack;d. 5.00 a.m., 4 April 1774, of strangury (congestion of bladder) and fever; reputed last words, ‘I am not at ease in my mind’; bur. Temple Church, monument at expense of The Club in Westminster Abbey, with Latin epitaph by Johnson (‘qui omnes fere scribendi genus tetigit, et nullum tetigit, quod non ornavit [there was almost no subject he did not write about, and he wrote on nothing without enhancing it]’ - who also remarked to Boswell, ‘Let not his frailties be remembered; he was a very great man’ (Prior, Life of Goldsmith); there are extensive references to Goldsmith in Boswell’s Life of Dr. Johnson;
 
post-hum.: Miscellaneous Works of Goldsmith (1801), with Percy’s Memoir of Goldsmith; Dublin editions of poems and plays in 1777 and 1780; English edns. in 1831 and 1846; an edition of Vicar of Wakefield appeared in 1843 with ills. by William Mulready; the edition of Deserted Village by R. H. Newell (1811), contains the first account of the locality of the eponymous village, with engravings of same by Aitkin; remembered for his kindness to the common people among whom he lived; characterised as consummate booby in Boswell’s Life of Johnson; statue by J. H. Foley at College Green on front of TCD West Gate, 1864; James Prior wrote a life of Goldsmith (2 vols., 1836), to accompany an edition of the Works issued in (4 vols. 1836-37); others were written by Washington Irving (1844), John Foster (1848); Peter Cunningham’s edition of the Works (1854) was the first issue of Murray’s British Classics, and reissued with an introduction by Austin Dobson (1900); it fell to Sydney Owenson [later Lady Morgan], in The Wild Irish Girl (1806), to identify him as an Irish writer whose pen captured the scenes of his native country, a theme reiterated by John Montague and others; a modern edition of The Vicar of Wakefield was ill. by Hugh Thompson; Tom Murphy dramatised The Vicar of Wakefield [c.1975], and adapted She Stoops to Conquer to an Irish setting. RR CAB ODNB PI JMC ODQ DIB DIW DIL OCEL NCBE OCIL FDA
[ top ]

Works
Individual editions, Citizen of the World (1760-61); The Traveller (1764); The Deserted Village (1770); The Vicar of Wakefield (1766); The Good Natur’d Man (1768); An Essay on the Theatre; or, A Comparison between the Laughing and Sentimental Comedy (1773) [anon., Westminster Gazette, Jan. 1773]; She Stoops to Conquer (1774); History of the Earth and Animated Nature, 8 vols. [see also infra]; The Haunch of Venison, a poetical epistle to Lord Clare (London: G. Kearsly & J. Ridley 1776), 4o. Also, Lives of Dr Parnell and Lord Bolingbroke, with The Bee (Belfast 1818), vi, 243pp.

RICORSO Library, “Irish Classics” - full-text editions

Collected Editions: The Miscellaneous Works of Oliver Goldsmith, M.B., 4 vols. (London: J. Johnson, C. & J. Robinson 1801); R. S. Crane, ed., New Essays by Oliver Goldsmith (Chicago UP 1927); Katherine [Canby] Balderston, ed., The Collected Letters of Oliver Goldsmith (Cambridge UP 1928); Arthur Friedman, The Collected Works of Oliver Goldsmith, 5 vols. (Oxford: Clarendon P. 1966); John Lucas, ed., Oliver Goldsmith, Selected Writings (Belfast: Blackstaff Press 1990); Alan Rudrum & Peter Dixon, eds., Selected poems of Samuel Johnson and Oliver Goldsmith [Arnold’s English Texts] (London: Edward Arnold 1965), 146pp.

[ top ]

Bibliography, Temple Scott, Oliver Goldsmith Biographically and Bibliographically Considered (NY 1928); Katherine Canby Balderston, A Census of the Manuscripts of Oliver Goldsmith (NY 1926).

[ top ]

Dublin reprint editions: The Citizen of the World, 2 vols. (Dublin: George and Alex. Ewing 1762); Do., another edn. 2 vols. (Dublin: J. Williams, 1769); Do., another edn. 2 vols. (Dublin: the United Company of Booksellers, 1775. Essays. 2nd edn. (Dublin: J. Williams, 1767); Do., another edn. 3rd edn. (Dublin: James Williams, 1772); Do., another edn. 3 vols. (Dublin: J. Stockdale for J. Moore, 1793). The Vicar of Wakefield, 2 vols. (Dublin: W. and W. Smith, A. Leathley, J. Hoey, Snr., P. Wilson, J. Exshaw, E. Watts, H. Saunders, J. Hoey, Jnr., J. Potts, and J. Williams, 1766); Do., another edn. 2nd edn. 2 vols. (Dublin: W. and W. Smith, et al., 1766); Do., another edn. 2 vols. Corke: printed by Eugene Swiney, 1766); Do., another edn. 2 vols. (Dublin: W. and W. Smith, et al., 1767); Do., another edn. (Dublin: the United Company of Booksellers, 1791); Do., another edn. 2 vols. (Dublin: printed byJ. Stockdale, forJ. Moore, 1793); Do., another edn. 2 vols. (Dublin: T. Henshall, [1794]). Le curé de Wakefield (Dublin: G. Gilbert, 1797. The Good Natur’d Man [A Comedy, As performed at the Theatre-Royal in Covent-Garden] (Dublin: J. A. Husband, for J. Hoey, Snr., P. and W. Wilson, J. Exshaw, H. Saunders, W. Sleater, J. Williams, D. Chamberlaine, J. Potts, J. Mitchell, J. Sheppard, and W. Colles, 1768), 70pp. 12o, Do., another edn. (Dublin: J. Hoey, sen., et al., 1770); Do., another edn. (Dublin: Messrs. Price, Sleater, W. Watson, Whitestone, Chamberlaine, S. Watson, Burrowes, Potts, Williams, Hoey, Wilkinson, Sheppard, Colles, Wilson, Moncrieffe, Walker, Jenkin, Exshaw, Burnet, Hillary, Wogan, Mills, White, Higly, and Beatty, 1784). She Stoops to Conquer, Belfast: printed by James Magee, 1773); Do., another edn. (Dublin: Messrs. Exshaw, Saunders, Sleater, Potts, Chamberlaine, Williams, Wilson, Hoey, Jnr, Husband, Lynch, Vallance, Colles, Walker, Moncrieffe,Jenkin, Flin, and Hillary, 1773); Do., another edn. (Dublin: Exshaw, et al. [excluding Colles], 1773); Do., another edn. (Dublin: Bartholomew Corcoran, 1774); Do., another edn. (Dublin: Messrs. Price, Sleater, W. Watson, Whitestone, Chamberlaine, S. Watson, Burrowes, Potts, Williams, Hoey, Wilkinson, Sheppard, Colles, Wilson, Moncrieffe, Walker, Jenkin, Exshaw, Burnet, Hillary, Wogan, Mills, White, Higly, and Beatty, 1784); Do., another edn. (Dublin: Messrs. Price, et al., 1785); Do., another edn. (Dublin: Graisberry and Campbell, for William Jones, 1792). The Traveller, or a Prospect of Society (Dublin: George Faulkner, 1767); Do., another edn. (Dublin: George Faulkner, 1770). The Deserted Village (Dublin: J. Exshaw, H. Saunders, B. Grierson, J. Potts, W. Sleater, D. Chamberlaine, J. Hoey, Jnr, J. Williams, C. Ingham, J. Porter, and R. Moncrieffe, 1770); Do., another edn. 2nd edn. (Dublin: H. Saunders, B. Grierson, J. Potts, W. Sleater, D. Chamberlaine, J. Hoey, Jnr., J. Williams, C. Ingham, J. Porter, and R. Moncrieffe, 1770); Do., another edn. (Dublin: Messrs. Price, Sleater, W. Watson, Whitestone, Chamberlaine, S. Watson, Burrowes, Potts, Williams, Hoey, Wilkinson, Sheppard, Colles, Wilson, Moncrieffe, Walker, Jenkin, Exshaw, Burnet, Hillary, Wogan, Mills, White, Higly, and Beatty, 1784); Do., another edn. Poems, Belfast: printed by James Magee, 1775); Do., another edn. (Dublin: Charles Downes, for Thomas Reilly, 1801); Do., another edn. The Haunch of Venison (Dublin: W. Whitestone, W. Watson, W. Sleater, J. Potts, J. Hoey, W. Colles, W. Wilson, R. Moncrieffe, G. Burnet, C. Jenkin, T. Walker, W. Hallhead, W. Spotswood, M. Mills,J. Exshaw, J. Beatty, and C. Talbot, 1776). Poems and Plays (Dublin: Messrs. Price, Sleater, W. Watson, Whitestone, Chamberlaine, S. Watson, Burrowes, Potts, Williams, Hoey, Wilkinson, Sheppard, W. Colles, W. Wilson, Moncrieffe, Walker, Jenkin, Hallhead, Exshaw, Spotswood, Burnet, P. Wilson, Armitage, E. Cross, Hillary, Wogan, Mills, White, T. Watson, Talbot, Higly, and Beatty, 1777); Do., another edn. (Dublin: Wm. Wilson, 1777); Do., another edn. new corrected edition (Dublin: Messrs. Price, et al., 1785); Do., another edn. The Beauties of Goldsmith (Dublin: J. Rea, for Messrs. S. Price, Walker, Exshaw, Beatty, Wilson, Wogan, Burton, Byrne, and Cash, 1783); Do., another edn. An History of the Earth and Animated Nature, 8 vols. (Dublin: J. Williams, 1776); Do., another edn. 8 vols. (Dublin: J. Williams, 1777); Do., another edn. 8 vols. (Dublin: J. Williams, 1782-83). An History of England in a Series of Letters from a Nobleman to his Son, 2 vols. (Dublin: J. Exshaw and H. Bradley, 1765); Do., another edn. 2 vols. (Dublin: J. Exshaw and H. Bradley, 1767); Do., another edn. 4th edn., 2 vols. (Dublin: J., Exshaw and W. Colles, 1784). The History of England, from the Earliest Times to the Death of George II, 4 vols. (Dublin: A. Leathley, J. Exshaw, W. Wilson, H. Saunders, W. Sleater, D. Chamberlaine, J. Hoey, Jnr., J. Potts, J. Williams, J. Mitchell, J. A. Husband, W. Colles, T. Walker, R. Moncrieffe, and D. Hay, 1771); Do., another edn. 4th edn., 4 vols. (Dublin: W. Sleater, H. Chamberlaine, J. Potts, W. Colles, R. Moncrieffe, T. Walker, W. Wilson, J. Exshaw, and L. White, 1789); Do., another edn. 5th edn. 4 vols. (Dublin: William Porter, for W. Gilbert, P. Wogan, J. Exshaw, W. Porter, W. McKenzie, J. Moore, W. Jones, and J. Rice, 1796); Do., another edn. An abridgement of the History of England, from the invasion of Julius Caesar, to the death of George II. 5th edn. (Dublin: James Williams, 1779. The Roman History, 2 vols. (Dublin: S. Powel, J. Exshaw, H. Saunders, B. Grierson, W. Sleater, D. Chamberlaine, J. Potts, J. Hoey, Jnr., J. Williams, and C. Ingham, 1769); Do., another edn. 2 vols. (Dublin: S. Powel, et al., 1771); Do., another edn. 2 vols. (Dublin: P. Wogan, J. Exshaw, W. Sleater, J. Rice, and R. White, 1792); Do., another edn. 2 vols. Cork: printed by J. Connor, 1800). The Roman History, abridged for schools (Dublin: P. Wogan, 1798. The Grecian History, 2 vols. (Dublin: printed forJames Williams, 1774); Do., another edn. 2 vols. (Dublin: P. Wogan, 1801). [From Richard Cargill Cole, Irish Booksellers and English Writers, 1740-1800 (London: Mansell Pub.; NJ: Atlantic Heights 1986), Appendix 4 [pp.245-47].

[ top ]

Miscellaneous Works” (var. edns.), The Miscellaneous Works of Oliver Goldsmith, M.B. Containing all his essays and poems (London: W. Griffin 1775), iv, [9-]200pp., 8o; another edn. (London: W. Griffin 1778), vi, 225pp., 12o; another edn. (London: W. Osborne & T. Griffin 1780; 1782; 1784; 1786), vi, 225pp., 8o; another edn. (London: W. Osborne & T. Griffin 1786), 238pp., 12o; another edn. (London: W. Osborne & T. Griffin; Gainsbro’: H. Mozley 1789), 238pp.,. 12o; The Miscellaneous Works of Oliver Goldsmith, M.B. Consisting of his essays, poems, plays [ &c.], 2 vols. (Edinburgh, Perth: R. Morison & Sons 1791), 12o; The miscellaneous works, 4 vols. (Edinburgh: Geo. Mudie 1792), 12o; The Miscellaneous Works of Oliver Goldsmith; now first uniformly collected, 7 vols. (Perth: R. Morison & Son; Edinburgh: A. Guthrie 1792) plates, port. 8o; The Miscellaneous Works of Oliver Goldsmith, M.B. Containing all his essays and poems; with an account of the life and writings of the author. A new and correct edition (London: J. Deighton 1793), xli, 288pp., 12o; another edn. (Glasgow: J. & M. Robertson, et al. 1795), another edn. (Boston [Mass.]: Thomas & Andrews, 1795), 237pp. 12o; [Samuel Rose, ed.,] The Miscellaneous Works of Oliver Goldsmith, M.B. A new edition, To which is prefixed, some account of his life and writings [by Thomas Percy, Bishop of Dromore], 4 vols. (London: J. Johnson, et al. 1801; 1806), pls., port. 8o. . 4 vol.: plates; port. 8o; another edn. (London: W. Otridge & Son, 1812); another edn. (Glasgow: R. Chapman 1816); another edn. (London: F. C. & J. Rivington, et al. 1820); another edn., 6 vols. (London: Samuel Richards 1823), plates; port. 12o; Washington Irving, ed., The Miscellaneous Works of Oliver Goldsmith, with an account of his life and writings. A new edition. 4 vols. (Paris: A. & W. Galignani; Jules Didot 1825), plate, port., 8o; Irving, ed., The Miscellaneous Works of Oliver Goldsmith, with an account of his life and writings, stereotyped from the Paris edition (Philadelphia: J. Crissy; Desilver, Thomas & Co. 1836), 527pp., plate; port. 8o; The Miscellaneous Works of Oliver Goldsmith, with an account of his life and writings, 4 vols. (Paris: Baudry’s European Library, &c. 1837), plate; port., 8o; James Prior, ed., The Miscellaneous Works of Oliver Goldsmith, M.B. Including a variety of pieces now first collected (London: John Murray 1837), 8o; Irving, ed., The Miscellaneous Works of Oliver Goldsmith, M.B. To which is prefixed some account of his life and writings [extracted from the edition of 1823]; another edn. (Edinburgh: Thomas Nelson 1840), xxii, 458pp., plate, port., 8o; The Miscellaneous Works of Oliver Goldsmith, M.B. With a brief memoir of the author [ &c.] (London: Andrew Moffat; Glasgow: D. A. Borrenstein 1841), xii, 308pp.; illus. 8o; The Miscellaneous Works of Oliver Goldsmith, M.B. To which is prefixed some account of his life and writings. A new edition, [etc.] (Edinburgh: Thomas Nelson 1843) xxii, 458pp., plate, port., 8o; James Prior, ed., The Miscellaneous Works of Oliver Goldsmith, including a variety of pieces now first collected, 4 vols. (Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott & Co. 1866), ill. plates.; The Miscellaneous Works of Oliver Goldsmith. With biographical introduction by Professor Masson [The Globe edition] (London & NY: Macmillan & Co. 1869 [1868]; 1871), lx, 695pp., 18cm.

[ top ]

Modern Editions, William Henry Hudson, intro. & annot., Vicar of Wakefield [Heath’s English Classics] (Boston: D.C. Heath & Co. [1920]), xxxv, [1], 264, [2]pp, pls., port.; R. S. Crane, ed., New Essays by Oliver Goldsmith (Chicago UP 1927); Katherine Balderston, ed., The Collected etters of Oliver Goldsmith (Cambridge UP 1928); Arthur Friedman, ed., The Collected Works of Oliver Goldsmith, 5 vols. (Oxford: Clarendon Press 1966); The Deserted Village by [OG] with a note on the author and a summary of his life by Desmond Egan (Curragh: Goldsmith Press 1978), 44pp.; Tom Davis, ed., She Stoops to Conquer [New Mermaid Ser.] (London: A & C. Black 1996) [8th edn.]; The Deserted Village, ill. Blaise Drummond (Oldcastle: Gallery Press [2002]), 58pp.

[ top ]

Criticism
  • [Bishop] Thomas Percy, Life of Dr. Oliver Goldsmith (1801) [var Memoir], and Do. [rep.], ed., Richard Harp (Salzburg: Institüt f[ü]r Englische Sprache und Literatur 1976);
  • James Prior, Oliver Goldsmith, 2 vols. (1837);
  • John Foster, The Life and Times of Oliver Goldsmith (London 1848 [another edn. 1855]);
  • Washington Irving, Oliver Goldsmith, A Biography (1849) [based in Prior; available at Wikisource online; accessed 08.03.2011];
  • William Black, Goldsmith (London 1881);
  • Mathias McDonnell Bodkin, In the Days of Goldsmith (1903);
  • M. P. Conant, The Oriental Tale in England in the Eighteeth Century (NY: Random House 1908);
  • J. A. Strahan, “Oliver Goldsmith”, in Blackwood's Magazine [Vol. CCX] (July-Dec. 1921), [p.221ff.; online; 23.11.2010].
  • H. J. Smith, Oliver Goldsmith’s Citizen of the World, A Study (Yale UP 1926);
  • Temple Scott [pseud. of J. H. Isaac], Oliver Goldsmith Bibliographically and Biographically Considered (NY: Bowling Green P. 1928);
  • Stephen Gwynn, Oliver Goldsmith (London: Thorton Butterworth 1935) [var. 1937];
  • R. W. Jackson, Goldsmith: Essays Towards an Interpretation (Dublin APCK 1951), and Do. [rep.] ( Plainview, N.Y.: Books for Libraries Press [1974]), 47pp.
  • Ralph M. Wardle, Oliver Goldsmith (Kansas UP; London: Constable 1957);
  • G. Sherburn, ‘the Periodicals and Oliver Goldsmith', in A Literary History of England, ed. A. C. Baugh [2nd edn.] (NY: Knopf 1957), pp.1057-58;
  • Oscar Sherwin, The Life and Times of Oliver Goldsmith (NY 1961);
  • Clara M. Kirk, Oliver Goldsmith (NY: Twayne 1967);
  • J. Dussinger, ‘Oliver Goldsmith, Citizen of the World’, in Studies in Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century, 55 (1967), pp.445-61;
  • Ricardo Quintana, Goldsmith: A Georgian Study (NY: Macmillan 1967; London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson 1969);
  • Robert Hopkins, The True Genius of Oliver Goldsmith (Johns Hopkins UP 1969);
  • A. Lytton Sells, Oliver Goldsmith, His Life and Works (London: Allen & Unwin; NY: Barnes & Noble 1974);
  • George Sebastian Rousseau, ed., Goldsmith: The Critical Heritage (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul 1974);
  • A N. Jeffares, ‘Goldsmith and the Good-Natured Man,’ in Hermathena, CXIX (Dublin 1975) [rep. as ‘Good-Natured Goldsmith’, in Images of Invention: Essays on Irish Writing (Gerrards Cross: Colin Smythe 1996), pp.90-105];
  • John Ginger, The Notable Man: The Life and Times of Oliver Goldsmith (London: Hamish Hamilton 1977);
  • J. B. Lyons, The Mystery of Oliver Goldsmith’s Medical Degree (Blackrock: Carraig Books 1978);
  • Samuel J. Woods, Jr., Oliver Goldsmith: A Reference Guide (Boston: G. K. Hall 1982);
  • Wolfgang Zach, ‘Oliver Goldsmith on Ireland and the Irish: Personal Views, Shifting Attitudes, Literary Stereotypes’, in Studies in Anglo-Irish Literature, ed. Heinz Kosok (Bonn: Bouvier 1982) [q.pp.];
  • Andrew Swarbrick, ed., The Art of Oliver Goldsmith [Critical Studies Series] (NJ: Barnes & Noble; London: Vision Press 1982) [var. 1984; incls. John Montague, ‘The Sentimental Prophecy: A Study of the Deserted Village’, pp.90-107, also in The Figure in the Cave; infra];
  • Harold Bloom, ed., Oliver Goldsmith (NY: Chelsea 1987);
  • W. J. McCormack, ‘Goldsmith Biography and the Phenomenology of Anglo-Irish Literature’, in Oliver Goldsmith: The Gentle Master, ed., Seán Lucy, (Cork UP 1984) pp.168-93 [ incls. A. N. Jeffares, et al.];
  • John Montague, ‘The Sentimental Prophecy: A Study of the Deserted Village’, in The Figure in the Cave (Dublin: Lilliput 1989), pp.61-77;
  • Katherine Worth, Sheridan and Goldsmith (NY: St. Martin’s Press 1992); E. H. Mikhail, ed., Goldsmith: Interviews and Recollections (NY: St. Martin’s Press 1993); Peter Dixon, Oliver Goldsmith Revisited (Boston: Twayne Publ. 1991) [q.pp.];
  • Richard C. Taylor, Goldsmith as Journalist (NJ: Farleigh Dickinson UP; London: Assoc. UP 1993), 205pp.;
  • B. S. Pathania, Goldsmith and the Sentimental Comedy (New Delhi: Prestige Books 1998);
  • Declan Kiberd, ‘Nostalgia as Protest: Goldsmith’s “Deserted Village’’’ & ‘Radical Pastoral: Goldsmith’s She Stoops to Conquer’, in Irish Classics (London: Granta 2000), pp.107-23 & pp.124-36.
 

See also James Boswell, Life of Johnson [1791], G. B. Hill; revised L. C. Powell, 6 vols. (OUP 1939-50); Richard Ryan, Biographia Hibernica: Irish Worthies (1821), Vol. II, p.181-97; J. J. Kelly, The Early Haunts of Oliver Goldsmith (q.d.), and C. A. Moore, Backgrounds of English Literature 1700-1776 (Minnesota UP 1953);

[ top ]