Ernest Gébler

Criticism

Life
1915-[?]; b. Dublin; worked backstage at Gate in 1930s; novels include He Had My Heart Scalded (1945), on a Dublin childhood; issued The Plymouth Adventure (1949) - The Voyage of the Mayflower (US 1950) - selling 5 million copies and filmed in the US with Spencer Tracy in the lead; contrib. to Envoy in 1949; bought Lake Park, Roundwood, a demesne in Wicklow, later sold to Richard Murphy, 1955; married and divorced; his plays incls. She Sits Smiling, Call Me Daddy, Cry for Help, and Eileen O’Roon; remarried to Edna O’Brien, 1954; a memorial service at Westminster Abbey attended by a large number of his journalist-peers; his claim to having writing much of her early novels in a mentoring capacity has been strenuously contested by O’Brien; Gébler is the subject of an autobiographical account by Carlo Gébler, which reveals a bullying and unfeeling attitude as husband and father. DIW

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Works
Novels, A Week in the Country; The Love Investigator; The Old Man and the Girl; Hoffmann (published in England as Shall I Eat You?); Not the End of the World [1987?].

Plays, She Sits smiling; The Spaniard in Galway; Eileen O’Roon (on BBC TV as Why Aren’t you Famous?); A Cry for Help; Call Me Daddy. Screenplays, Hoffman, The Girl with Green Eyes (The Lonely Girl, Edna O’Brien); television drama, Call Me Daddy; Women can be Monsters; Why Aren’t you Famous; Where Will I Find What Will Change my Life?; A Little Milk of Human Kindnesss.

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Criticism
Carlo Gébler, Father and I (London: Little, Brown 2000); Brendan Lynch, Prodigals of Genis: The Writers and Artists of Dublin’s Baggotonia (Dublin: Liffey Press 2011) [chap. on Gébler]; see also ‘The Poison from the Past: Shirley Kelly interviews Carlo Gébler', in Books Ireland (2000 Sept.), pp.211-12.

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Notes
Namesake?: Not to be confused with Stan Gébler Davies, author of James Joyce: A Portrait of the Artist (London: Davis-Poynter 1975), which gives a damaging account of the novelist's domestic life.

Lake Park: For an account of Lake Park, see Richard Murphy, The Kick (London: Granta 2002), p.164.

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