Klaxon

[1923-24]; Con Leventhal contrib. perceptive review of Ulysses, 1923, which the printers would not touch, and so he founded Klaxon, one issue [DIB].

LIB NOTE: The magazine includes ‘The Midnight Court’, trans. Percy Arland Ussher from the Gaelic of Brian Merriman. In four parts, of which part I appears here (p.3-11); ‘North’, a 15-line poem by H. [Francis] Stuart (p.11); ‘The Ulysses of James Joyce’ by Laurence K Emery (pp.14-20) [see RX]; a poem, ‘Cleopatra’, by FR Higgins (p.21); and Thomas McGreevy [sic] on ‘Picasso, Mamie [sic] Jellet, and Dublin Criticism’ (p.23-27 [END]), with some other pieces. A photoplate, facing page one, shows a female Negro Sculpture in Wood’; the editorial, called ‘Confession’ calls the paper ‘the offspring of gin and vermouth in a local public-house’ expresses the wish to adminstering a ‘whiff of Dadaist Europe to kick Ireland in artistic wakefulness’. The Ulysses essay is characterised as ‘exhibit of the year from the Salon des Réfusés. ‘Young men must not invest in safe securities’ says Cocteau in block capitals [reproduced here]. We fling our speculative bonds on the waters and assert our lustiheaded youth.’ L.K.E. (p.1-2). There is also a excitable and comic preface by F.R.H. (p.2).

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