D. G. Waring

CriticismCommentary


Life
?1891-1977; [Dorothy Grace; m. Hartnett; pseud. Dorothy Gainsborough Waring]; b. Co. Cavan, to a Protestant upper-middle class family; m. St. Clair Harnett and lived in Licenser House, Co. Antrim, which was burnt down 1964, for which the owners later received 30,000 compensation; Waring issued a number of romantic novels written from a strongly Unionist standpoint and dealing with political and matrimonial strife, often intertwined, chiefly in an Irish big-house setting but involving wartime themes; all were published by John Long, and some reprinted by Mellifont Press in 1944;
 
Grace] appears to have been associated with the Londonderrys and has been accused of Nazi sympathies [see NDNB] but her family have asserted that her involvement with British fascists was occasioned by her duties as a member of the Forces, which rhymes with the plots of her novels; in Fortune Must Follow (1937), for instance, Neill McCrane is an anti-German agent who return to Northern Ireland and breaks up local cattle-smuggling on the border; in Against My Fire (1941), an evacuated couple reveal themselves as emotional wreckers and finally as Nazi agents in Co. Down [see Clarke, infra]; she died on 24 Oct. 1977; there are cuttings about her in the Linen Hall Library collection. IF2

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Works
  • Deep Malice (London: John Long 1939), 320pp., and Do., [abridged] (Dublin: Mellifont 1944), 128pp.;
  • And If I Laugh (London: John Long 1940), 256pp.;
  • Against My Fire (London: John Long 1941), 224pp.;
  • Fortune Must Follow (London: John Long 1937), 320pp.;
  • Hated There With (London: John Long 1942), 231pp. [see “Notes”, infra.];
  • Not Quite So Black (London; Robert Hale 1948), 270pp.;
  • Nothing Irredeemable (London: John Long 1936), 286pp.;
  • Wilful-missing (London: John Long 1936), 288pp., and Do. (Dublin: Mellifont 1944), 128pp.;
  • The Oldest Road (London: John Long 1938), 288pp.;
  • Out of Evil (London: John Long 1937), 320pp., and Do. (Dublin: Mellifont 1944). 128pp.;
  • This Day’s Madness (London: John Long 1939), 288pp.;
  • This New Corn (1940), 288pp.

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References
Desmond Clarke, Ireland in Fiction: A Guide to Irish Novels, Tales, Romances and Folklore [Pt. 2] (Cork: Royal Carbery 1985) lists eight novels, giving tongue in cheek summaries of each, Nothing Irredeemable (London: John Long 1936) [Sir Desmond Loughlin, ex-Tans, dispossessed, separates from wife in London; finally reunites]; Out of Evil (London: John Long 1937) [visitor’s romance among Anglo-Irish gentry in Co. Down; Orange viewpoint but entertains idea that if Orange and IRA stand together against Ireland’s common enemy her troubles will end]; Deep Malice (London: John Long 1939) [Anita Etheridge creates mischief through séances and occultism in Co. Down]; The Fortune Must Follow (London: John Long 1938) [retired anti-German agent Neill McCrane breaks up a cattle-smuggling gang in Newcastle, Co. Down]; This New Corn (London: John Long 1940) [Kevin Magowan, back from fighting for Franco, sorts out matrimonial problems in Co. Down]; And If I Laugh (London: John Long 1940) [B Specials Officer and people of Co. Down village in wartime; anti-Catholic and anti-Irish viewpoint]; Against My Fire (London: John Long 1941) [unmarried couple evacuated to Co. Down reveal themselves as emotional wreckers and finally as Nazi agents]; Not Quite So Black (London: John Long 1948) [Barry Loughran returns from 8th Army to find wife having an affair; after complications involving the ‘not so black’ step-mother Lucile, wife Eva and her lover Rupert drive drunk off cliff; Barry marries Maeve, cousin of Rupert - for whom he has been working in the big house as chauffeur].

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New Dictionary of National Biography: Dorothy Grace Waring [m. Harnett; pseud. D. Gainsborough Waring (18911977, fascist campaigner and author. The ODNB article is by Gordon Gillespie. (Access by password online]

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Notes
Hatred There With (1942), is billed as a ‘thrilling story of Nazi conspiracy’ on the front dust-jacket. Naomi Doak (UUC), who writes on Ulster women authors, informs us that the author is said to have had British fascist associations [BS].

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