Edward Walshe

LifeWorksCriticismCommentaryQuotationsReferencesNotes

Life
fl. 1552; presum. Irish and Protestant, a writer on the plantation, he recommended heavy populations of settlers in Ireland. See also Edward Walsh’s The Office and Duety in Fightyng for our Countrey (1545), a loyalist document.

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Works
The office and duety in fightyng for our countrey: Set forth with dyuerse stronge argumentes gathered out of the holy scripture prouynge that the affection to the natiue countrey shulde moche more rule in vs christians then in the Turkes and infidels, who were therein so feruent, as by the hystoriis dothappere (Imprynted at London: In Aldersgate strete by Johannes Herford. At the costes and charges of Robert Toye dwellynge in Paules church yarde, at the sygne of the Bell, 1545), [40].pp. [ded. signed Edward Walshe].

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Criticism
D[avid] B[eers] Quinn, Intro., ‘Edward Walshe’s Conjectures Concerning Ireland, 1552’, in Irish Historical Studies, 5 (1947), pp.303-22.

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Commentary
W. B. Stanford, Ireland and the Classical Tradition, 1984, p.203 and n. 228. ‘In 1552, Edward Walshe of Waterford addressed his Conjectures on the state of Ireland to the Duke of Northumberland in the hope of influencing the English colonial policy to favour dense rather than sparse plantation, ‘the waye taken by the polliticke romaynes’ (with reference to agrarian law of Caius Gracchus in 123 b.c.) Bibl., D. B. Quinn, ‘Edward Walshe’s Conjectures Concerning Ireland’, in Irish Historical Studies, 5 (1947), 303-22.

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