Brian Walker

Life
Professor of History, QUB; sometime Director of Irish Studies Institute, QUB; ed. of Appletree Faces of Ireland series (1991), and works on Irish elections; a freq. contrib. to Irish Booklore; co-editor of The History of the Irish Book (OUP) with Robert Welch (UU).

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Commentary
John Whyte, Interpreting Northern Ireland (OUP 1990): B[rian] M. Walker, Ulster Politics: The Formative Years, 1868-86 (1989), argues that a powerful combination of Catholic and Presbyterian tenant-farmers opposed Church of Ireland landlords in the 1870s and 80s and that it was not until the general election of 1886 that the cleavage which marks North of Ireland politics was firmly established. Behind the split lay the growing autonomy of the Catholic electorate after Reform, the increased presence of the clergy in Home Rule and nationalist organisation, and the growing support of nationalist politicians for the Catholic line in education. (Whyte, op. cit., p.127.)

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References
Belfast Central Public Library holds Frank Matcham, Architect (Blackstaff 1988).

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