Richard Chenevix Trench (1807-86)

Works


Life
b. Dublin, ed. Cambridge; Protestant Archbishop of Dublin, 1864-84; issued poetry collections incl. Justin Martyr (1835), Honor Neale (1838), and Poems from Eastern Sources (1842); Sacred Latin Poetry (1849), Christian hymns in translation; also trans. a play of Calderon; best-known for his popular philological works, Study of Words (1851) and English Past and Present (1856), taking evolutionist view of language as ‘fossil poetry’;
 
acquainted with Gladstone and Garibaldi; Alfred Lord Tennyson dedicated “The Palace of Art” to him; accredited with a motion at the Philological Society on 7 January 1858 which led to the creation of the Oxford English Dictionary; issued Poems, 2 vols. (1885); spent summers at Broomfield House, Ashford, Co. Wicklow; d. London; his Study of Words was a source for Joyce’s preparations and quotations in “Oxen of the Sun” (Ulysses). CAB ODNB PI DIB DIW TAY OCEL MKA ODQ RAF OCIL

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Works
The Story of Justin Martyr, and Other Poems (1835); Sabbation, Honor Neale, and Other Poems (1838); Poems (1841); Genoveva: A Poem (1842); Poems from Eastern Sources, The Steadfast Prince, and Other Poems (1842); Elegiac Poems (1843); Sacred Latin Poetry (1849); Poems Written During the Russian War (1854-55); Alma and Other Poems (1855); Poems (NY 1856); Timoleon, A Poem (1881); Poems, 2 vols. (1885) [Rafroidi].

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Commentary
Susan Davison
, ‘Joyce’s Incorporation of Literary Sources in “Oxen of the Sun”’, in Genetic Joyce Studies, 9 (Spring 2009): ‘Richard Chevenix Trench’s The Study of Words (1892), a posthumously revised edition of On the Study of Words: Lectures Addressed (Originally) to the Pupils of the Diocesan Training-School Winchester (1851). In ‘Richard Chenevix Trench and Joyce’s Historical Study of Words’, [Gregory] Downing suggests that “Joyce absorbed the idea of analyzing language as an organic medium of culture from Trench’ and that &147;Oxen” subsumes lots of linguistic phenomena discussed in his four major works: On the Study of Words; On the Lessons in Proverbs; English Past and Present; and A Select Glossary. He noticed a proliferation of “Trench-words” in the final text of “Oxen” , but had been unable to identify any “canvassing clusters or sequences” on the notesheets. [21] We can now say with confidence that Joyce had access to The Study of Words as he was writing “Oxen”’ (Online; accessed 21.05.2010). Reference to Downing, ‘Joyce's “Oxen of the Sun” Notesheets: A Transcription and Sourcing of the Stylistic Entries: A Compilation of the Existing Transcriptions and Sourcings, Supplemented by New Sourcing Work’, in Genetic Joyce Studies, 2 (2002).

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Quotations
H. Hovelaque [professeur au lycée Saint-Louis], Anthologie de la Littérature irlandaise des Origines au XXe siècle (Paris Libraire Delagrave 1924), contains extracts: ‘La puisssance du langage’:

La language est aussi l'histoire fossile. Quel souvenir de grandes révolutions sociales - révolutions dans les nations et dans les sentiment des nations - est contenu dans le mot “frank” done on se sert, nous le savons tous, pour exprimer tout ce qui est généreux, droit et libre. ... ’; ‘Le langage est plein d’enseignements, parce qu’il est l’expression intime, l’incarnation, si je puis m’exprimer ainsi, des sentiments,des pensées et de l’experience d’une nation ou même souvent, et de tous les résultats qu’elles ont obtenues,de tous les progres qu’elles ont faits dans le cours des siècles. [... &c.]’ (Hovelaque, op. cit., pp.361ff.)


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References Oxford Dictionary Quotation selects ‘England, we love thee better than we know’; and verses from The Kingdom of God. (See also Melasina, supra.)

Try ... www.cyberhymnal.org/bio/t/r/trench_rc.htm
www.fact-index.com/r/ri/richard_chenevix_trench.html

Charles A. Read, The Cabinet of Irish Literature (London, Glasgow, Dublin, Belfast & Edinburgh: Blackie & Son [1876-78]), lists Justin Martyr and other poems (1835); Sabbation, Honor Neale, and other poems (1838); Sacred Poems for Mourners; Sacred Latin Poetry.

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D. J. O’Donoghue, The Poets of Ireland: A Biographical Dictionary (Dublin: Hodges Figgis & Co 1912); b. 9 Sept.; ed. Harrow and Cambridge; Archbish. of Dublin [January 1, 1864, after Dr. Whately]; Dean of Westminster 1856; hon DD TCD, 1864; d. Eaton Square Lon. 28 Mar. The Story of Justin Martyr and Other Poems (Lon. 1835), Sabbation, Honor Neale and other poems (1838, Poems (anon. 1841?), Genoveva, a poem (1842), Poems from Eastern Sources; The Steadfast Prince and other Poems (1842), Poems written during the Russian War; Alma and other poems (1855), Timeleon, a poem (1881), Poems, 2 vols. (Lon 1885); many other theol. works.

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Brian McKenna, Irish Literature, 1800-1875: A Guide to Information Sources (Detroit: Gale Research Co. 1978) , calls him ‘an Irishman impervious to any of the influences that were shaping a native literature’; cites John Bromley, The Man of Ten Talents, A Portrait of Richard Chenevix Trench (1959) 253p. See also The Field Day Anthology of Irish Writing (1991), note at p.455.

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Patrick Rafroidi, Irish Literature in English: The Romantic Period, 1789-1850 (Gerrards Cross: Colin Smythe 1980), Vol. 2; Bibl., The Story of Justin Martyr, and other poems (1835); Sabbation, Honor Neale, and other poems (1838); Poems (1841); Genoveva, a poem (1842); Poems from Eastern Sources, The Steadfast Prince, and other poems (1842); Elegiac Poems (1843); Sacred Latin Poetry (1849); Poems Written During the Russian War (1854-55); Alma and other Poems (1855); Poems (NY 1856); Timoleon, poem (1881); Poems, 2 vols. (1885).

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Margaret Drabble, ed. Oxford Companion of English Literature (OUP: 1985), ‘drew attention to masterpieces of Latin hymnody’]; and Life’s a Dream, trans Calderon; theological works; also The Study of Words [1851], from which ‘Language is fossil poetry ... many a single words is itself a concentrated poem, having stores of poetical thought and imagery laid in it.’

Henry Boylan, Dictionary of Irish Biography (Dublin: Gill & Macmillan 1988): 1807-1886; fought against disestablishment of the Church [of Ireland, but presided over its new identity; incapacitated by an accident in 1875; died 23 Eaton Sq., London. Study of Words (1851).

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University of Ulster Library, Morris Collection, holds Study of Words (1914).

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Notes
Lord Tennyson’s The Palace of Art is dedicated to him.

Author? Probably author of Richard Chenevix [sic], A Charge to the Clergy of [ ...] Dublin and Glendalough and Kildare [&c.] (Dublin: Hodges 1868), 83pp.; another of the same kind, [ ...] at the Visitation (Dublin: Hodges Oct. 1869) [Emerald Isle Books, Cat. 1995].

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