Richard Talbot [Earl of Tyrconnell] (1630-1691)

Criticism

Life
with Charles II in exile up to the Restoration; appt. Viceroy of Ireland by James II, 1687-89; commander of the Catholic cavalry at the Battle of the Boyne; he was the object of poetic celebration by Daibhí Ó Bruadair and much Protestant criticism for his management of the state during the period of the Jacobite parliament in Dublin; styled ‘Richard Teague’ in “Lilliburlero”; and later anathemised by Lord Macaulay as ‘lying Dick Talbot ... Bully, Bravo, Pimp, Sychopant, Hypocrite’; his brother was Peter Talbot, Archbishop of Dublin [q.v.]. ODNB DIB

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Criticism
Some contemporary papers
  • Albertus Warren, A Panegyrick to His Excellency Richard Earl of Tirconnell (Dublin: Printed by Joseph Ray 1686), 1 broadside [verse; Chadwyck-Healey, Early English Books, 1641-1700; 1297:17]; The Present Dangerous Condition of the Protestants in Ireland: with a new order of [Richard Talbot, Earl of] Tyrconil [concerning the export of passengers and goods]: in a letter from Dublin, Feb. 19, 1688 ([Dublin] rep. 1689; copy in TCD Library];
  • The Popish Champion, or, A compleat history of the life and military actions of Richard Earl of Tyrconnel, generalissimo of all the Irish forces now in arms[,] Wherein you have a true account of his birth and education, his advancement and honours, his treacherous disarming the Protestants, and cruelties towards them. The progress of his arms; the towns he has taken and demolish'd, and the families he has ruin'd. Together with a relation of all the skirmishes, battels, sieges, and remarkable transactions which have hapned under his government; with the particulars of the late bloody fight in the north, the manner of the late King's landing at Kinsaile, with what remarkable has hapned since. As also a brief description of the Kingdom of Ireland in its provinces, principal towns, fortresses, situation and present deplorable state; the means how it came to be a conquer'd kingdom, with the sundry rebellions made by the natives against the Crown of England, and by what means reduced. Written for the present satisfaction of all good Protestants, and dedicated to the officers in his Majesties army, and all the rest of the gentlemen souldiers now going against Tyrconnel. To this treatise is added the life and memorable actions of Father Petre, &c. Publish'd with allowance]. ([London]: [printed for John Dunton ...] MDCLXXXIX [1689], [4], 58pp., 4o. [ Short title Index as The history of the life and actions of Richard Talbot Earl of Tyrconnel [Wing (2), P2944];
  • Antoine Anselme [Abbot of Saint-Sever], Oraison funèbre de Richard Talbot, Duc de Tyrconnel [together with sim. orations for Messire Charles de Ste. Maure, Duc de Montausier, and Princesse Anne Marie Louise d’Orléans, Duchesse de Montpensier (1712).
  • By the Lord Deputy and Council [A proclamation for the protection of the rights, properties, and religion of the people] ( Dublin: 21 Feb. 1686), fol. [British Library; for other proclamations and declarations, see infra]
 
Proclamations and declarations by the Lord Deputy and Council*

A proclamation for the protection of the rights, properties, and religion of the people ( Dublin: 21 Feb. 1686); A proclamation commanding a stricter observance of a former proclamation for the suppressing of tories, robbers, &c. (Dublin: 21 Feb. 1686); another (Dublin: 24 Feb. 1686/7); another (Dublin: 7 March 1686); another [Dublin: 2 March, 1688); another (Dublin: 8 Feb. 1687); another (Dublin: 4 April 1687); another (Dublin: 11 April, 1687); A declaration concerning the pay and clothing of the army (Dublin: 29 April, 1687); another (Dublin: 2 May 1687); A declaration ordering the country and market people coming to the Curragh Camp to be treated well, &c.] (Dublin: 18 July 1687); An act of council revoking a former act of 2 May, 1687, reducing the import duty on Spanish iron (Dublin: 18 July, 1687); another (Dublin: 31 Oct. 1687); A proclamation commanding all persons assembled in a riotous manner to disperse, &c. (Dublin, 25 Jan. 1688); another (2 Feb. 1688/9)]; A declaration commanding the inhabitants of Dublin to deliver up their arms, ammunition, &c. (25 Feb. 25th 1688); another (Dublin: 1 March 1688/9); A proclamation concerning an outbreak in Ulster and at Sligo (Dublin: 7 March 1688); another (Dublin: 1 June 1688); another (Dublin: 23 June 1688); By the Lord Deputy General ... a declaration for the good government of the army (the Camp, 20 July, 1688); A declaration concerning the incamping of the horse and dragoons and for incouraging such as have hay to preserve it, and to bring it to the camp (Dublin: 28 Aug. 1688); A declaration for the good government of the army (Dublin: 24 Aug. 1688); another (Dublin: 20 Sept. 1688); another (Dublin: 25 Sept. 1688); another (Dublin: 15 Oct. 1688); another (Dublin: 7 Dec. 1688). Also, A Proclamation [by the King], prohibiting His Majesties subjects to enter into the service of foreign Princes and States. [2 March, 1688.]

 
*Full listing from COPAC, being the extant documents of this kind in all UK and Irish Libraries; many listed as Ireland 1922.

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Commentary
Patrick Kennedy, Modern Irish Anecdotes [n.d.]: to his wife belongs the credit of the retort to James’s saying, ‘Madam, I congratulate you on the swiftness of your countrymen in retreat’; ‘Your majesty deserves a higher compliment, for you have outstripped the fleetest of them.’ (p.12.)

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Barry McLoughlin, review of John Childs, The Williamite Wars in Ireland 1688-1691 (London Continuum 2008), in Books Ireland (Feb. 2009): ‘[...] From the outset the Williamite forces were numerically superior, better led and amply equipped with artillery. On the Irish side, despite French assistance, the question was posed whether the Catholics should sue for terms after the defeat at the Boyne. Tyrconnell thought that further resistance was questionable, but his Irish officers feared for their estates. Had William granted them this concession in 1690, the war might have ceased, but William, like Cromwell in 1649-50, had creditors to satisfy in the city and the security was Irish land.’ (p.18.)

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Notes
Kith & kin (1): A proclamation concerning a cessation of armes: agreed and concluded on at Siggingstowne, in the county of Kildare, the fifteenth day of September, in the ninteenth yeare of His Majesties raigne, by and between Iames Marques of Ormonde, ... for & in the name of our gratious soveraigne Lord Charles ..., and Donogh Viscount Muskery, Sir Lucas Dillon, Knight, Nicholas Plunkett, Esquire, Sir Robert Talbot, Baronet Sir Richard Barnewell, Baronet, Torlogh ó Neale, Geffrey Browne, Ever Mac-Gennis, & Iohn Walsh, Esquires : authorized by His Majesties Roman Catholic subjects, of whose party they are and now in armes in the said kingdom, &c. : to treat and conclude with the said marques for a cessation of armes by vertue of an authority given unto them bearing date at Cashell the 7 day of September, in the said ninteenth yeare of His Majesties raigne of the other party : whereunto is added an instrument touching the manner of payment of 30[,]800 pound sterling by severall payments. [iss. by Lords Justices and Council; Charles I, sovereign] (1643).

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Kith & kin (2): See The Whole Trial and Examination of Richard Townley, Edward Tildesly, and Thomas Hall, Esqrs; and Robert Talbot, Genlteman [sic] (Dublin: Printed by Gwyn Needham on Cork-hill [1716]), 1 sh., ([2]pp.); 31 x 19 cm. [The four men were accused of having taken part in the Jacobite rising of 1715 (COPAC).

Kith & kin (3): Catalogue of valuable printed books, music, autograph letters and historical documents comprising the property of Mrs M. Talbot Holden-Jones [with that of Sir Peter Smithers, Count Charles Oberndorff, Richard Newton, and Mrs. Ursula Fürstner] [to] be sold by auction by Sotheby & Co. [...] at their large galleries [...] Monday, 11th May 1970-Tuesday 12th May 1970 ([Sotheby Parke Bernet & Co.] 1970).

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