Thomas Sheridan (1687-1738)

Extracts from the works


Life
[“The Elder”: RR, FDA1;] b. 1687, in Cavan, gs. of Bedell’s collaborator Donnchadh Siordain [Gl. Donnchadh Ó Siordáin], later becoming Rev. Dennis Sheridan; nephew of Thomas and William Sheridan, both bishops; entered TCD, Oct. 1707; BA 1711; MA 1714; BD 1724; DD 1726; regained the family home of Quilca (from Cuilcagh), nr. Virginia, Co. Cavan, through marriage, having been lost by family attachment to Jacobite cause during Williamite confiscations; opened a school at Capel St. (‘I am famous for giving the best advice and following the worst’), where Swift occasionally taught when he was ill;
 
founded the Intelligencer with Swift, 1729; Sheridan’s friendship with Swift much strained by the former’s long convalescence in his home (Quilca); alienated Swift by accusing him of avarice, unwisely answering to the former’s earlier request that he notify him of any growing infirmity [ODNB]; published Philoctetes [1725], and prose translations of Persius and Juvenal; enjoyed patronage of Lord Carteret due to Swift and received a living at Ringcurran, Co. Cork, 1725;
 
lost viceregal favour soon after through the folly of preaching on the text ‘Sufficient to the day is the evil therefore [&c.]’ at the birthday of Queen Anne [var. anniversary of Hanoverian succession], occasioning suspicions of Jacobitism 1725; disadvantageously exchanged a Cork parish for another nr. Quilca, 1730; appt. Headmaster of Royal School, Cavan, but failed and returned impoverished to Dublin; d. 10 Oct. 1738, in Rathfarnham, at the table of Mr. O’Callaghan, br. of a former pupil; discovered by Dr Helsham to have a greatly enlarged heart at autopsy;
 
11 vols. of his manuscript remains are held in Pearse St. Library (Gilbert Collection), and others in TCD Library; called by Lord Orrery ‘ill-starred, good natured, improvident […] a punster, a quibbler, a diffler and a wit […] his pen and his fiddlestick were in continual motion, and yet to little or no purpose’; a portrait by J. Stewart is held in the Harvard Theatre Collection and another by John Lewis in the National Gallery of Ireland; he was father of Thomas Sheridan, actor, theatre manager, playwright, and elocutionist, and grandfather of the playwright R. B. Sheridan. RR ODNB PI DIL FDA OCIL
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Works
  • An Easy Introduction of Grammar in English for the Understanding of the Latin Tongue (Dublin 1714);
  • Preface to Homer’s Battle of the Frogs and Mice with the Remarks of Zolius, to which is Prefix’d The life of the Said Zolius (Bernard Lintot: Temple Gates [London] 1717);
  • Ars pun-ica, sive Flos linguarum/ The Art of Punning; or The Flower of Languages; in seventy nine rules: for the farther improvement of conversation, and help of memory , by the labour and industry of Tom Pun-Sibi [pseud. of Thos. Sheridan] (Dublin: printed by & for James Carson, in Coghill’s-Court in Dame’s-street, opposite to the Castle Market 1719), [16], 38, [2]pp. 4o., and Do. [printed in Dublin] (London: J. Robert [et al.] [1719]), [10], xiii, [1], 27, [5]pp., 21 cm.;
  • The Philoctetes of Sophocles, translated from the Greek (Dublin: printed by J. Hyde & E. Dobson for R. Owens Bookseller in Skinner-Row 1725) [ded. to Lady Carteret and Jon. Swift];
  • The Life of Rev. Dr. Jonathan Swift, Dean of St. Patric[k]’s Dublin, by Thomas Sheridan, MA (London: Bathurst [et. al.] 1734) [see details];
  • trans. The Satyrs of Persius (Dublin: G. Grierson; London: D. Browne 1739; London: A. Millar 1739); trans. The Satires of Juvenal (London 1739/Dublin 1769; Cambridge: J. Nicholson, 1777);
  • The Life of Rev. Dr. Jonathan Swift, Dean of St. Patric[k] ’s Dublin, by Thomas Sheridan, MA (London: C. Bathurst, W. Strahan [et al.] 1784; 2nd edn. 1787.)
Miscellaneous
  • A Prologue to Julius Caesar As It was Acted at Madam Violante’s Booth December the 15th, 1732, by some of the young Gentlemen in Dr. Sheridan’s School [Folger Library], and [with Jonathan Swift,] The Intelligencer, No.1-19 (Dublin & London 1729), Nos. 1-20 (London 1730) [& reps., as infra].
Reprints
  • Robert Hogan [ed.,] ‘Selected Poems of Thomas Sheridan’, in Journal of Irish Literature [ed. Hogan], XVI, 1 (January 1987), pp.33-60, and Do. (May 1987), pp.19-48;
  • Robert Hogan & Edward A. Nickerson, eds., The Faithful Shepherd: A Translation of Battista Guarini's Il pastor fido, by Thomas Sheridan (Delaware UP [1989]), 193pp.;
  • Robert Hogan, ed., The Poems of Thomas Sheridan (Assoc. Univ. Presses 1994), 431pp.

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Bibliographical details
The Life of Rev. Dr. Jonathan Swift, Dean of St. Patric[k]’s Dublin, by Thomas Sheridan, MA (London: Printed for C. Bathurst, W. Strahan, B. Collins, J. F. & C. Rivington, L. Davis, W. Owen, J. Dodsley, T. Longman, R. Baldwin, T. Cadell, J. Nichols, T. Egerton, and W. Bent. MDCCLXXXIV [1784]). Front. plate of Swift, also a plate of Dr. Thomas Sheridan, Cook sculpt. [p.368 facing]. First Vol. [of which no second]: Dedication to Sir George Savile. Introduction; Life of Doctor Swift; SECT. I: From his Birth to the Death of Sir William Temple; SECT. II: From the Death of Sir William Temple to the Time of Swift’s Introduction to Lord Oxford [31]; SECT. III: From his Introduction to Mr. Harley, to the Death of the Queen [63]; SECT. IV: A Review of his Conduction during his Connection with the Queen’s last Ministry [165]; SECT. V: From his Return to Ireland to his Death [210]; Sect. VI: Private Memoirs of Swift [283]; SECT. VII: Various anecdotes of Swift [395]; SECT. VIII: Anecdotes of the Family of Swift, written by himself [545]; His Will [557]. (For extracts, see under Quotations, infra.)

[ See 2nd Edn. (1787) - https://archive.org/details/liferevdrjonath00shergoog ]

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Criticism
  • James Woolley, ‘Sheridan’ [bibliographical essay], in Studies in Eighteenth-Century Literature, XI (1979), and Woolley, ed., The Intelligencer (OUP [q.d.]);
  • Briciu Dolan, ‘Tom the Punman, Dr.Thomas Sheridan, Friend of Swift,’ in Journal of Irish Literature, XVI, I (January 1987), pp.3-32;
  • Robert Hogan, intro. to The Poems of Thomas Sheridan (Assoc. Univ. Presses 1994) [431pp.];
  • Michael Cronin, Translating Ireland: Translations, Languages, Cultures (Cork UP 1996), pp.73-76.
See also Richard Ryan, Biographia Hibernica: Irish Worthies (1821), Vol. II, pp.504-06,

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Commentary
Jonathan Swift, Blunders, Deficiencies, Distresses and Misfortunates of Quilca (1724), on shortcomings of Sheridan’s home in Co. Cavan: ‘But one lock and a half in the whole house. The key of the garden lost … The door of the Dean’s bed-chamber full of large chinks … the Dean’s bed threatening every night to fall under him … the little table loose and broken in the joints […]. A great hole in the floor of the ladies’ chamber, every hour haphazarding a broken leg’. (Quoted in Constantia Maxwell, Ireland Under the Georges (1940; rev. 1949), with footnote remark that ‘Quilca was the little house in Co. Cavan which belonged to his thriftless friend Thomas Sheridan, where he himself had occasionally spent many happy weeks of quiet enjoyment in the company of Mrs Dingley and Esther Johnson, and where he is said to have written part of Gulliver’s Travels. (op. cit., p.93.) Further: ‘But one chair in the house for sitting on, and tha is in a very ill state of health. / The kitchen perpetually crowded with savages. Not a bit of turf in this cold weather; and Mrs Johnson [Stella] and the Dean in person, with all their servants, forced to assist at the bog, in gathering […]’ (Quoted in Victoria Glendinning, Jonathan Swift, Hutchinson 1998, pp.163-64; cited in Pauline Holland, doct. diss., UUC 2004.)

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Sir Leslie Stephen, Swift [1882] (London: Macmillan 1899): ‘After the war of Wood’s halfpence Swift became friendly with Carteret, whom he respected as a man of genuine ability, and who had besides the virtue of being thoroughly distrusted by Walpole. When Carteret was asked how he succeeded in Ireland, he replief that he had pleased Dr. Swift. Swift took advantage of the mutual goodwill to recommend several promising clerymen to Carteret’s notice. He was especially warm in behalf of Sheridan, who received the first vacant living and a chaplaincy. Sheridan characteristically spoint his own chances by preaching a sermon upon the day of the accession of the Hanoverian family, from the text, “Sufficient unto the day is the evil thereof.” The sermon was not political, and the selection of the text a pure accident; but Sheridan was accused of Jacobitism, and lost his chaplaincy in consequence. Though generously compensated by the friend in whose pulpit he had committed this “Sheridanism”, he got into difficulties. His school fell off; he exchanged his preferments for others less preferable; he failed in a school at Cavan, and ultimately the poor man came back to die at Dublin, in 1738, in distressed circumstances. Swift’s relations with him were thoroughl characteristic. He defended his cause energetically; gave him most admirable good advice in rather dictatorial terms; admitted him to this closest familiarity, and sometimes lost his temper when Sheridan too a liberty [192] at the wrong moment, or resented the liberties taken by himself.’ [Cont.]

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Sir Leslie Stephen (Swift [1882], Macmillan 1899) - cont [no para.]: ‘ A queer character of the “Second Solomon”, written, it seems, in 1729, shows the severity with which Swift could sometimes judge his shiftless and impulsive friend, and the irritability with which he could resent occasional assertions of independence. “He is extremely proud and captious”, says Swift, and “apt to resent as an affront or indignity what was never intended for either”, but what, we must add, had a strong likeness to both. One cause of poor Sheridan’s troubles was doubtless that assigned by Swift. Mrs. Sheridan, says this frank critic, is “the most disagreeable beast in Europe”, a “most filthy slut, lazy, and slothful, luxurious, ill-natured, envious, suspicious”, and yet managing to govern Sheridan. This estimate was probably shared by her husband, who makes various references to her detestation of Swift. In spite of all jars, Swift was not only intimate with Sheridan and energetic in helping him, but to all appearances really loved him. Swift came to Sheridan’s house when the workmen were moving the furniture, preparatory to his departure for Cavan. Swift burst into tears, and hid himself in a dark closet before he could regain his self-possession. He paid a visit to his old friend afterwards; but waws now in that painful and morbid state in which violent outbreaks of passion made him frequently intolerable. Poor Sheridan rashly ventured to fulful an old engagement that he would tell Swift frankly of a growing infirmity, and said something about avarice. “Doctor”, replied Swift, significantly, “did you never read Gil Blas?” When Sheridan soon afterwards sold his school and returned to Dublin, Swift received his old friend so inhospitably that Sheridan left him, never again to enter his house. Swift [193] indeed had ceased to be Swift; and Sheridan died soon afterwards.’. [Cont.]

Sir Leslie Stephen (Swift [1882], Macmillan 1899) - cont. [next para.] ‘Swift often sought relief from the dreariness of the deaney by retiring to, or rather by taking possession of, his friends’ country-houses. In 1725 he stayed for some months, together with “the ladies”, at Quilca, a small country-house of Sheridan’s and compiled an account of the deficiencies of the establishment - meant to be continued weekly. Broken tables, doors without locks, a chimney stuffed with the dean’s great-coat, a solitary pair of tongs forced to attend all the fireplaces and also to take the meat out of the pot, holes in the floors, spikes protruding from the bedsteads, are some of the items; whilst the servants are all thieves, and act upon the proverb, “The worse their sty, the longer they lie.” Swift amused himself here and elsewhere by indulging his taste in landscape gardening, without the consent and often to the annoyance of the proprietor.’ [There follows a narration of Swift’s relations in this vein with Sir Arthur Acheson of Market Hill.] (pp.192-94; Source: Sir Leslie Stephen, Swift [1899 Edn.; rep. by BiblioLife - online; accessed 29.12.2009.) Note that Stephen was the founding editor of the DNB - for which he was knighted - and therefore the most probable author of the article therein.

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Henry Craik (Life of Jonathan Swift, 1894): ‘Most of the summers of 1724 and 1725, he [Swift] spent at Quilca, the quiet country retreat which Dr. Sheridan had made for himself in a bleak spot amongst the wildest of Cavan heaths […] Round it have clung many traditions of its owner, Swift, and their amusements. The stretch along which Sheridan was wont, as it is said, to attempt a revival of Roman chariot races; the slope close by the lake which he used for a theatre; the seat in the garden where Stella’s arbour stood; the lake itself where Sheridan is said to have constructed an impromptu island out of twigs and turf to astonish Swift - all these have their place in the stories that haunt the neighbourhood, with a vitaility strange when we consider how completely the surrounding in habitants are separated from the class for whom Swift wrote and spoke. Not far off is the house of Rantavan, near the street of Mullagh, the home, in Swift’s days, of Henry Brooke, where, according to tradtion, Brooke’s mother showed her superiority to the general fear of the Dean, by meeting Swift on his own ground of sarcasm.’ (Vol. II, p.170.)

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W. B. Stanford, Ireland and the Classical Tradition (IAP 1976; 1984): As headmaster of the Cavan Royal School from 1720 to 1726, Thomas Sheridan trained seniors to perform classical plays in the original Greek; the first performances of their kind in Ireland or Britain; Archbishop King refers to one in a letter of Dec. 1720, ‘I was invited to see Hippolytus acted in Greek by Dr Sheridan’s pupils. They did very well—spoke an English preface. The master had made one for them, but a parcel of wags got the boy and made another prologue for him.’ Quoted Elrington Ball, Correspondence of Swift 6 vols. (1910-14), iii, 124, n.3. The dedication of Sheridan’s Philoctetes (Dublin 1725) shows that the performance was attended by the Lord Lieutenant. [Cf. A. Lefanu, Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Mrs Frances Sheridan (London 1824), p.12.] ([Cont.)

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W. B. Stanford (Ireland and the Classical Tradition, 1984) - cont.: Swift wrote a commendation to Lord Dorset, Viceroy in 1735, ‘Your Grace must please to remember that I carried you to see a comedy of Terence acted by the scholars of Dr Sheridan with which performance you were well pleased. The doctor is the most learned person I know in this kingdom and the best schoolmaster here in the memory of man having an excellent taste in all parts of literature.’ (Ball, Correspondence, v. p.150). Stanford characterises this as the ‘exaggerated praise by a friend’, and notes a translation of Sophocles’s Philoctetes, and of Persius’ Satires as well as a Latin grammar and miscellaneous writings. [33] Further: Dublin printing of textbooks nearly restricted to a handsome production of Sheridan’s Philoctetes (1729) printed by Hyde and Dobson in 1725; also eds. of Terence (1729) and Tacitus (1730) from Grierson [by Sheridan?] [54]. Bibl.., T. Sheridan, Philoctetes (1725) [sic].

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Richard Cargill Cole, Irish Booksellers and English Writers, 1740-1800 (1986), writes, ‘Sheridan was so alarmed by Dublin printers’ Patrick Wogan and Patrick Byrne’s piracy of his Dictionary, first printed in London, that he wrote a notice in the Edinburgh Advertiser (6 July 1784): “Whoever shall discover any person vending, or exposing to sale, any book or books, of the above pirated edition, in Scotland, or elsewhere in Great Britain, shall, upon conviction of the delinquent, receive the sum of Ten Pounds from the author, over and above the penalty by act of parliament, to be paid by Mr. Alexander Johnston, writer [i.e. lawyer] in Edinburgh.”’ (Cargill, p.7.)

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Joseph Th. Leerssen, Mere Irish & Fior-Ghael: Studies in the Idea of Irish Nationality, Its Development and Literary Expression Prior To The Nineteenth Century (John Benjamins Pub. Co., Amsterdam & Philadelphia, 1986), writes: Thomas Sheridan … made a vigorous attack on the cheaper kinds of pun in a book with the unashamedly punning title, Ars Pun-ica sive Flos Linguarum, or the Flowers of Languages, by ‘Tom Pun-sibi’ (1719); answered by The Folly of Puns by ‘Jack Serious’ (1719), and in a bitterly hostile anonymous broadsheet, Tom-Pun-Sibi Metamorphosed (1719). [p.174].

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Pat Rogers, review of Jonathan Swift & Thomas Sheridan, The Intelligencer, ed. James Woolley (Clarendon Press ?1991), 363pp., in Times Literary Supplement (17 July 1992), [q.pp.]; The Intelligencer appeared more or less weekly between May 11 and early December 1728, split into two series, the break occurring between the tenth and eleventh, with a 20th emerging later in May 1729. Extracts were reprinted in the London paper, [Nathaniel] Mist’s Weekly Journal (becoming Fog’s Journal in the process, when the Jacobite Mist left England). Sheridan’s contributions include a vicious Tale of a Tub-style allegory on the treatment of Patrick and Andrew by their brother George. The first 19 numbers were ed. by William Bowyer in 1729, and Swift’s contributions went into Faulkner’s landmark ed. of Works, 1735. Swift’s familiar contributions include his review of The Beggar’s Opera; a scabrous poem, ‘Mad Mullinix and Timothy’, and several items echoing the gloomy Short View of the State of Ireland (actually reprinted in one Intelligencer issue) and anticipating the Modest Proposal. Thomas Sheridan, best known as father of the person who figures in Boswell’s Johnson, and grandfather of Richard Brinsley Sheridan, shows as an accomplished polemicist and not just a monkey to Swift’s organ-grinder; not easy to distinguish the two men on internal evidence alone; indeterminate authorship of some parts of the series, including the poem on Dean Jonathan Smedley (who can now be dated d.1729); The Intelligencer shows frequent influence from Pope’s gallery of villains in the first Dunciad. The Intelligencer is full of the life of Dublin streets; draws on the resurgent Irish historiography [making] the first ever edition of a Swiftian text set squarely in its Irish context.

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Maureen E. Mulvihill, review of Hogan, ed., The Poems of Thomas Sheridan (Assoc. Univ. Presses 1994), in ILS (Fall 1995), p.13; cites John Boyle, 5th Earl Orrery, ‘Thomas Sheridan possessed cacoethes scribendi to the greatest degree, and was continually letting off squibs, rockets, and all manner of little fireworks from the press, by which he offended many particular persons, who, although they stood in awe of Swift, held Sheridan in defiance … He was slovenly, indigent, and cheerful. He knew books better than men; and he knew the value of money least of all … he remained a punster, a quibbler, a diffler, and a wit. Not a day passed without a rebus, an anagram, or a madrigal. His pen and fiddlestick were in constant motion.’ (Remarks on the life and writings of Dr Jonathan Swift, 1752).

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Quotations

To the Dean, when in England, in 1726
 

You will excuse me, I suppose,
For sending rhyme instead of prose,
Because hot weather makes me lazy,
To write in metre is more easy.
While you are trudging London town,
I’m strolling Dublin, up and down;

While you converse with lords and dukes,
I have their betters here, my books:
Fix’d in an elbow chair at ease,
I chuse companions as I please.
I’d rather have one single shelf,
Than all my friends, except your self;
For after all that can be said,
Our best acquaintances, are the dead.

While you’re in raptures with Faustine,
I’m charmed at home, with our Sheelina;
While your staving there in state,
I’m cramming here with the best of wine;
Burgundy, Cyprus, and Tockay,
Why so can we, as well as they.
No reason, my dear Dean,
But you should travel home again.
What tho’ you mayn’t in Ireland hope,
To find such folk as Gay and Pope:
If you with rhymers here would share,
But half the wit, that you can spare;
I’d lay twelve eggs, that in twelve days,
You’d make a doz’n of Popes and Gays.

Our weather’s good, our sky is clear.
We’ve ev’ry joy, if you were here;
So lofty, and so bright a skie,
Was never seen by Ireland’s-Eye!
I think it fit to let you know,
This week I shall to Quilca go;
To see McFayden’s horny brothers,
First suck, and after bull their mothers.
To see alas, my wither’d trees!
To see what all the country sees!
My stunted quicks, my famish’d beeves
My servants such a pack of thieves;
My shatter’d firs, my blasted oaks,
My house in common to all folks:
No cabbage for a single snail,
My turnips, carrots, parsnips, fail;
My no green pease, my few green sprouts;
My mother always in the pouts:
My horses rid, or gone astray,
My fish all stol’n, or run away:
My mutton lean, my pullets old,
My poultry starv’d, the corn all sold.

A man come now, from Quilca says,
They’ve stolen the locks from all your keys:
But what must fret and vex me more,
He says, they stole the keys before.
They’ve stol’n the knives from all the forks,
And half the cows from half the sturks;
Nay more, the fellow swears and vows,
They’ve stol’n the sturks from half the cows,
With many more accounts of woe,
Yet tho’ the devil be there, I’ll go:
’Twixt you and me, the reason’s clear,
Because, I’ve more vexation here.

 
A. N. Jeffares & Peter Van de Kamp, eds., Irish Literature: The Eighteenth Century - An Annotated Anthology, Dublin/Oregon: Irish Academic Press 2006, pp.138-40.)

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The Life of Rev. Dr. Jonathan Swift, Dean of St. Patric[k]’s Dublin (London: C. Bathurst, et al., MDCCLXXXIV [1734]): ‘[…] We may judge of the greatness of his influence, from a passage in a letter of Lord Carteret to him, March 24 1732, ” I know by experience how much the city of Dublin thinks itself under your protection; and how strictly they used to obey all orders fulminated from the sovereignty of St. Patrick’s”. And in the postscript to another of March 24 1736, he says, “When people ask me how I governed Ireland? I Say, that I pleased Dr. Swift.” / But great as his popularity was, it was chiefly confined to the middling, and lower class of mankind. To the former of these his chief applications wre made, upon a maxim of his own, “That the little virtue left in the world, is chiefly to be found [273] among the middle rank of mankind, who are neither allured out of her paths by ambition, nor driven by poverty.” All of this class he secured almost to a man. And by the lower ranks, and rabble in general, he was reverenced almost to adoration. They were possessed with an enthusiastic love to his person, to protect which they would readily hazard their lives; yet on his appearance among them, they felt something like a religious awe, as if in the presence of one of a superior order of beings. At the very sight of him, when engaged in any riotous proceedings, they would instantly fly different ways, like scholboys at the approach of their master; and he has often been known, with a word, and lifting up his arm, to disperse mobs, that would have stood the brunt of the Civil and Military power united. / As to the upper class of mankind, he looked upon them as incorrigible, and therefore had scarcely any intercourse with them. He says himself, that he had little personal acquaintance with any Lord Spirital or Temporal in the kingdom; and he considered the Members of the House of Commons in general, as a set of venal prostitutes, who sacrificed their principles, and betrayed theinterests of their country, to gratify their ambition or avarice. With thesehe livev in a continued state of warfare, makign them feel severely the sharp stings of his satyr; while the, on the other hand, dreading, and therefore hating him more than any man in the world, endeavoured to retaliate on him by every species of obloquy.’ [273]. (For longer extracts, see Library, “Authors”, infra.)

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References
Peter Kavanagh, Irish Theatre (Tralee 1946), refers to him as author of the first English trans. of Philoctetes of Sophocles (1725), and father of the theatre manager [and namesake].

Seamus Deane, gen. ed., The Field Day Anthology of Irish Writing (Derry: Field Day 1991), Vol. 1: selects ‘To the Dean when in England in 1726’ [Swift’s Poems, ed. Williams, 1958, III, pp.1042-44, here at 495-60; bibl., p.492]; p.395 [social life similar to that in London in ‘To the Dean’]; p.498.

Michael Cronin, Translating Ireland: Translations, Languages, Cultures (Cork UP 1996), cites The Philoctetes of Sophocles, translated from the Greek (Dublin: printed by J. Hyde and E. Dobson for R. Owens Bookseller in Skinner-Row 1725) [ded. to Lady Carteret and Swift] (Cronin, n.100 [p.89].)

A. N. Jeffares & Peter Van de Kamp, eds., Irish Literature: The Eighteenth Century - An Annotated Anthology (Dublin/Oregon: Irish Academic Press 2006), selects “To the Dean, when in England, in 1726” [138; as supra]; from The Intelligencer, 2 [140]; from The Intelligencer, 13 [144].

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Notes
Kith & Kin: Thomas Sheridan, was descended from Donnchadh Ó Siaradáin, one of Bedell’s translators of a century before. (See Robert Welch, A History of Verse Translation from the Irish 1789-1897, Gerrards Cross 1988, p.17). And note poss. connection with Bishop Bedell: ‘Early in 1642 he [Bishop Bedell] was allowed to transfer to the house of a clergyman friend, Rev. Dennis Sheridan, at Dromlor, which was already crowded with English refugees. He died there of a fever on 7 Feb. 1642 […] &c.’ (Dictionary of Irish Biography, 1988;, under Bedell.)

Portraits: A portrait of Thomas Sheridan by J. Stewart held in the Harvard Theatre Collection is reproduced in Jane Dunbar, Peg Woffington (1968), facing p.183; see also “Dr Sheridan’s School”, drawn by T. Archdeaken, in Samuel Whyte, [ed.,] Poems on Various Subjects (1795; rev. edn.), p.44.

Samuel Fitzpatrick (Dublin) has the story about Sheridan preaching the text, ‘Sufficient unto the day ..’, and losing all chance of preferment, adding that the ODNB erroneously states that this was Queen Anne’s birthday. (The story is also told in W. E. H. Lecky's History of Ireland in the Eighteenth Century.)

James Joyce makes an allusion to Sheridan’s ‘art of panning’ [sic] in Finnegans Wake (1939; p.184).

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