George Ogle

Life
1704-1746 [“The Elder”]; lived as gentleman on his estate in Co. Wexford; issued The Loves of Hero and Leander [and other trans.] (Dub. 1728); A Modest Defence of the Public Stews [being] an Essay upon [the] Whoring as it is Practised in these Kingdoms, [by pseud. Col. Harry Mordaunt] (1730), reissued as A History of the Sexes (1740), by Luke Ogle [another pseud.]; issued translations of Horace, Boccaccio, and Horace; also, and best-known, The Canterbury Tales of Chaucer, modernised by ‘several hands’ (1741), sometimes ascribed to Samuel Boyse, with contributions by Henry Brooke; wrote an epilogue for Brooke’s Gustava Vasa (US Edn. 1791); clever ‘translator, influenced Moore’s Anacreon’ [PI]. PI ODNB OCIL

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Works
The Canterbury Tales of Chaucer. Modernis’d by several hands
[George Ogle, Thomas Betterton, John Dryden, Samuel Cobb, Samuel Boyse, Henry Brooke, Alexander Pope, John Markland and - Grosvenor]. Publish’d by Mr. Ogle. [With the Life of Chaucer by John Urry. Including the spurious Tale of Gamelyn, and the continuation of the Squire’s Tale by Spenser.] [Another edition.]. 3 vol. J. & R. Tonson: London 1741. 8o. 2 vol. George Faulkner: Dublin 1742. 12o. (BL.)

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References
Dictionary of National Biography: 1704-1746, trans. Anacreon and Horace; published Antiquities Explained, Vol. I; and contrib. to modernised versions of Chaucer, 1741; lists Antiquities explained (Vol. I, 1737); his trans. of Anacreon appeared in appendix of James Sterling, Loves of Hero and Leander (1728), a work dedicated to him under the form of ‘an ingenious young gentleman’; Moore denied the charge of plagiarism made in John Bull (12 Sept. 1824), in his Journal (IV, 144). Ogle’s Antiquities explain’d (1737), ded. Duke of Dorset, being a Collection of figured gems, similar to one printed in London; good engravings, and some trans.; his verse trans. of Griselda or The Clerk of Oxford’s Tale appeared Sept. 1739; contrib. trans. to Tales of Chaucer Modernis’d, 1741, along with others by Dryden, Pope, Betterton, et al., while writing most of the prologues as well as seven artisan tales; supplied a continuation of the Squire’s Tale in Spenser’s Faerie Queene, Bk. 4, printed separately 1785. Note, no mention made of Defence of Stews or Luke Ogle in this entry.

British Library holds George Ogle, A Modest Defence of public Stews, sometimes attributed to George Ogle [or Bernard de Mandeville]. See also, under Luke Ogle, History of the Sexes, a modern defense, etc.

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