Nora Tynan O’Mahoney

Life
1865-[1904; var. O’Mahony]; b. Whitehall, Clondalkin, Co. Dublin; sis. of Katherine Tynan, m. John O’Mahoney, barrister (d.1904); called by Fr. Brown ‘Irish and Catholic’; novels include Mrs Desmond’s Foster Child (1912); also Una’s Enterprise (1907), ‘a chicken story’ inculcating thrift and poems, The Field of Heaven (1915). IF DIW

[ top ]

References
Stephen Brown
, Ireland in Fiction: A Guide to Irish Novels, Tales, Romances and Folklore [Pt. I] (Dublin: Maunsel 1919), lists novels for juveniles, Una’s Enterprise (1907) [in which girl of good social position maintains her widowed mother, brother and sister by poultry farming, ‘of which much is said’]; and Mrs. Desmond’s Foster Child (1912) [an Irish farmer’s wife switches the child of Anglo-Indian parents in her charge for her own, but confesses when the child is due to return to Indian; Irish atmosphere].

[ top ]

Desmond Clarke, Ireland in Fiction: A Guide to Irish Novels, Tales, Romances and Folklore [Pt. 2] (Cork: Royal Carbery 1985), adds The Secret of the Yellow Meadows Farm (Dublin n.d.), a children’s story; a stories for and about good little girls.

Belfast Public Library holds The Fields of Heaven (1915).

[ top ]

Notes
What men like: Nora Tynan O’Mahony [sic] writes on short skirts worn by women in the Irish Independent (2 Aug. 1928) where, following a discussion of women’s knees, she warns women “not to forget that men like reticence, far more perhaps than they like power and paint - and legs” (Louise Ryan, Gender, Identity and the Irish Press 1922-1937: Embodying the Nation Lampeter: Edwin Mellen Press 2002, p.56; see Breda Gray [review], Women’s Studies International Forum, Sept.-Oct. 2003, pp.500-01 and Diaspora E-list [Bradford], June 2004.)

[ top ]