Gerard Murphy

WorksNotes

Life
d.1959; appt. Prof. of History of Celtic Literature, UCD; ed. Éigse, 1939-1959; author of Saga and Myth in Ancient Ireland [q.d.] and The Ossianic Lore and Romantic Tales of Medieval Ireland (1961).

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Works
  • Saga and Myth in Ancient Ireland (Dublin: Cultural Relations Committee of Ireland / Colm Ó Lochlainn 1955), 64pp. [infra];
  • The Ossianic Lore and Romantic Tales of Medieval Ireland / Fianaíocht agus Rómánsaíocht [Irish Life and Culture Ser.] (Cultural Relations Committee / Three Candles Press 1961), 69pp. [Bibl. p.62.]

Bibliographical details
Saga and Myth in Ancient Ireland [Irish Life & Culture, 10] (Dublin: Cultural Relations Committee of Ireland / Colm Ó Lochlainn 1955), 64pp. [See extract in RICORSO Library, “Critical Classics”, infra]

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Notes
Obiter dicta: Note that Dillon & Chadwick end their chapter in on xxx with a quotation from Murphy in writing: ‘The Irish gods are neither “little people” nor “fairies”, but tall and beautiful and fair; in all their physical strength and power and fairness of countenance, and even dress, they are superior to human men and women. They recall rather the descriptions of the Gauls which we find in Classical writers. There are no withces or devils, no puerile miracles or mere vulgar displays of magical power. The suprenatural and the marvellous are invested with restraint and dignity. No question of guilt, or punishment or judgement in an after life ever disturbs the serenity of what Gerard Murphy has called that “strange loveliness” of Celtic mythology. It is this “strange loveliness” of “the otherworld atmosphere which gives its special beauty to the Irish mythological cycle.”’ (See Myles Dillon & Nora Chadwick, ‘Celtic Religion and Mythology and the Literature of the Otherworld’ [Chap. 7], The Celtic Realms, London: Weidenfeld & Nicholson 1967, p.158.)

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