Sinéad Moriarty

Notes

Life
b. and lives in Dublin; lived in Paris and London after graduation; author of The Baby Trail (2004), the narrative of 33-year old Emma Hamilton and her biological clock - commenced in a writer's group; issued From Here to Maternity (2006), about pregnancy and adoption; In My Sister’s Shoes (2007), in which Kate O’Brien, a single woman, returns to Dublin to take up responsibilities of her elder sister who is ill; issued Whose Life is it Anyway? (2008), her fifth novel, dealing with culture-clash within a family - released in UK as Keeping it in the Family; issued Pieces of My Heart (2010), about the marriage of Ava and Paul; Moriarty lives in Dublin with husband and three children; her work is usually classed as chick-lit. mixing sentimentality and humour and increasingly compared with Marian Keyes; Me and My Sisters (2011), in which the Devlin sisters, so very different, pull together in trouble.

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Works
The Baby Trail (Dublin: Penguin Ireland 2004), 311pp.; A Perfect Match (Dublin: Penguin Ireland 2005), 319pp.; From Here to Maternity (Dublin: Penguin Ireland 2006), 297pp.; In My Sister’s Shoes (Penguin Ireland 2007), 320pp.; Whose Life is it Anyway? (Dublin: Penguin Ireland 2008), 368pp.; Pieces of My Heart (Dublin: Penguin Ireland 2010), 439pp.; Me and My Sisters (Penguin Ireland 2011), 457pp.

There is an authorised/personal Sinead Moriarty website online (no bio-dates disclosed).

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Criticism
Roisín Ingle, review of The Baby Trail, in The Irish Times (4 Sept. 2004), Weekend, p.10; Anna Carey, review of Pieces of my Heart, in The Irish Times (7 Aug. 2010), Weekend.

Books Ireland (First Flush): "[Moriarty] has hit on a good formula for books which deal with serious topics but in a light-hearted, reassuring way. (Sept. 2011.)

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Notes
In My Sister’s Shoes (2007): ‘Kate O’Brien is thirty and has very little to think about except trying to keep her balance as she totters up London’s media-land ladder. Fiona O’Brien is Kate’s responsible older sister - with a husband, twin boys, a dog and now ... a life-changing problem. It’s a problem that means Kate going back to Dublin, pronto. There she finds herself stepping into Fiona’s shoes to look after two five-year-old scamps, as well as her widowed father, deluded rapper brother, disapproving brother-in-law and a host of assorted side-kicks. As if that wasn’t enough, the ex she thought she’d got over years ago turns up to haunt her. Will either of the O’Brien sisters survive? And even if they do, can either of them slip back into their old shoes ever again?’ (publisher’s note; COPAC online - 14.09.2008.)

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Whose Life Is It Anyway? (2008): ‘Niamh O’Flaherty, raised in London by patriotic Irish parents, Mick and Annie, has returned to Dublin, where she writes a fluffy newspaper column, and is expected to marry a nice Irish lad. However, Mr Right turns out to be French - older and an intellectual - and so Mr. Wrong in her parents’ eyes. To make matters worse, Pierre’s a snobbish parents Jean and Fleur are appalled at the idea of him marrying her. Cue a series of ups and downs as the lovers attempt to get married and please their parents at the same time.’ (See Books Ireland, Sept. 2008, p.199; also publisher's note; COPAC online - 14.09.2008)

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