Marchioness of Londonderry

Life
1878-1949 [Edith Helen Chaplin Vane-Tempest-Stewart]; dg. Viscount Chaplin; m. Marquis of Londonderry [supra]; prominent hostees for Tories in London, and was a friend of Ramsay MacDonald; sometimes styled suffragette; fnd. Women’s [War Service] Legion in 1914-18; Chairman of Queen’s Inst. of District Nursing; Pres. of Women’s Advisory Committee of Northern Counties Provisional Area of the National Union of Conservative and Unionist Associations; in charge of Red Cross station at Mount Stewart, where she laid out the gardens, viz., Mount Stewart, Newtownards, Co. Down. IF2.

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Works
The Magic Inkpot: A Volume of Irish Fairy Stories
(1928).

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Criticism
Anne de Courcy, Circe: Life of Edith, Marchioness of Londonderry (Sinclair-Stevenson 1993), 336pp., 16 pls.

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Commentary
George Dangerfield, The Strange Death of Liberal England (?1932; and rev. ed. 1972), gives account of the Londonderrys checking before acceptance that each house they were invited to could not contain a Home-Ruler at the time of the Bill in 1914, with consequence deterioration of social culture in London [291]. SEE also Padraic Colum’s account of Joyce’s comparison between the Stewart (Castlereagh) lineage of the Londonderrys and the son of Myles, the son of John Dillon (whom Joyce saw as the destroyer of Parnell (in The Joyce we Knew, ed. Ulick O’Connor (1967).

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References
Hyland Books (Cats. 214 & 220) list Marchioness of Londonderry, The Magic Inkpot: A Volume of Irish Fairy Stories (1st edn. 1928), 16 col. ills. by Brock and Lady Margaret Stewart.

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Notes
Caveat: avoid confusion between Lady Edith (1878-1949) and Lady Frances Anne (née Vane-Tempest), Marchioness of Londonderry and Countess of Antrim in her own right; both listed in DUB (the latter not dated). See also under Wilmot.