Liam Kennedy

Life
Economic History Lecturer, QUB; author of Adoption Of a Group Innovation In Irish Agriculture 1890-1914: An Exercise (Oxford: Institute of Agricultural Economics 1977); Conference on Co-operation in Northern Ireland (New University of Ulster 1978); ed., Crime and punishment in West Belfast [Summer School, West Belfast] (1994); The Early Response of the Irish Catholic Clergy to the Co-Operative Movement (q.d.); with [another], An Economic History of Ulster, 1820-1940 (Manchester UP 1985); Economic Theory of Co-operative Enterprises: Selected Readings (Oxford: Plunkett Foundation for Co-Operative Studies 1983); Retail Markets in Rural Ireland at the End of the 19th Century [n.d.]; Social and Economic Aspects of Co-Operative Amalgamation: A Case Study (1976); Susan Sontag: Mind as Passion (Manchester UP [q.d.]); Two Ulsters: A Case for Repartition (Belfast: QUB 1986); The Modern Industrialisation of Ireland, 1940-1988 [Economic & Social History Society of Ireland] (Dundalgan Press 1989), 74pp.; Co-operation in Northern Ireland (?1979); Colonialism, Religion and Nationalism in Ireland (Belfast: IIS/UB 1996). Also, ‘Modern Ireland: Post-Colonial Society or Post-Colonial Pretensions’, in Irish Review (Winter 1992/93), pp.107-21.

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Commentary
Eamon Hughes
, ‘Forgetting the Future’, in Irish Review, 25 (1999/2000), contends that Liam Kennedy’s rebuttal of post-colonialism overlooks the special conditions of emigration as a motor of a colonised economy. (Ref., ‘Modern Ireland: Post-colonial Society or Post-Colonial Pretensions?’, Irish Review, No. 13, Winter 1992/95, pp.107-21; here pp.14-15.)

Conor McCarthy, Modernisation: Crisis and Culture in Ireland 1969-1992 (Four Courts Press 2000),writes: ‘Liam Kennedy has, in fact, disputed the relevance of the whole “post-colonial” thesis to Ireland on precisely economic grounds (Kennedy, ‘Modern Ireland: Post-Colonial Society or Post-Colonial Pretensions’, in Irish Review, Winter 1992/93 [pp.107-21], n.p.). But what Kennedy ignores is the fact that social, political and even economic thinking takes place in the realm of ideology and culture, and it is here, as Colin Graham has recently demonstrated (Colin Graham, ‘Liminal Spaces: Post-Colonial Theories and Irish Culture’, in Irish Review (Autumn/Winter, 1994, p.38-39), that the kind of “post-colonial” analysis sponsored by groups such as Field Day might function to open up new areas of understanding. [...] However, Kennedy and Graham both reckon that the vocabularly of [25] imperialism, colonialism and neocolonialism have been discredited by their use in the context of the Northern crisis by Provisional Sinn Féin.’ (p.25.)

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