Michael Kearney

Life
fl.1635-1668; Gaelic scribe who translated Keating; resided ad Ballyloskye, Co. Tipperary; b. Co., 1635-1668, his text being the basis of the edition of The Kings of the Race of Eibhear, a poem of John O’Dugan [Seán Mór Ó Dubhagáin], brought out by John O’Daly in 1847. PI

 

Works
John Daly [viz., O’Daly], ed., The Kings of the Race of Eibhear, A Chronological Poem, by John O’Dugan, with a translation by Michael Kearney, A.D. 1635 (Dublin 1847).

[ top ]

Commentary
Russell K. Alspach, Irish Poetry from the English Invasion to 1798 (Penn UP 1959), p81f., giving details of his translation of Keating, as retaled by John Daly [O’Daly]; notes that a plate of the translation is included in Sir John Gilbert’s Facsimiles of National Manuscripts of Ireland, viz., Pt. IV, pl. LXXXIII; Commencement of Preface, transcribed by John O’Maelchonaire; text and tran. Pl LXXIV, Michael Kearney’s English version, 1668; Irish and English (Alspach, p.82); Alspach later discourses on Kearney’s translation of The Kings of the Race of Eibhear by John O’Dugan, quoting the Introduction: ‘I offer it as I found the same in an ancient mansucript, deserving of your kindnesse, if by a perfecter Coppie thereof appearing, you find any thing hereing misreported, or misplaced, you favourably rectifye the mistake, or omission by mee in this behalfe unwillingly committed’ (Alspach, p.104); Daly’s preface calls Kearney a native of Balllyloskye, Co. Cross Tipperary, and identifies him with Castle Kearney, a ruin which might have been his seat. (p.5; Alspach, p.104).

[ top ]

References
D. J. O’Donoghue, The Poets of Ireland: A Biographical Dictionary (Dublin: Hodges Figgis & Co 1912); refers to a poem by the title of The Kings of Cashel, translated from the Irish of John O’Dugan (1847), apparently trans. in 1635 and not printed till then.

[ top ]

Quotations
‘The most important part of pleasant Eire,/Is Munster of the mountains-studded plains,/On account of her nobility, her wealth,/Her store of precious stones, and the honour her people support./I cannot conceal the good qualities of the men of Munster,/In whom no flaw was ever found;/they were famed for love of freedom, comeliness of countenance,/And loftiness of spirit.’ (Daly, ed., The Race of Eibhear, 1847, p.31.

[ top ]