John Hogan (1800-58)


Life
b. Tallow, Co Waterford; raised in Cork, and ed. School of Art at Cork; worked in solicitor’s office; wood-carver with Woodward & Deane; worked for Dr Murphy, Bishop of Cork, carving 27 statues in wood and bas-relief for North Chapel; went to Rome with support of subscription and patronage of Lord de Tabley, working and residing there, 1824-49; converted to neo-classicism; revisited Ireland, 1829, 1840, &c.; refused Royal Hibernian Academy offer of membership; elected to Vir Tuosi del Pantheon, 1837; placed ‘Repeal cap’ on O’Connell’s head at Mullaghmast, Co. Clare, 1843;
 
returned to live in Ireland 1848 [var. 1849], as a result of the Italy revolution but disappointed by reception in post-Famine conditions; Irish works incl. ‘The Dead Christ’ (Carmelite Church, in Clarendon St. Dublin, 1828); Theobald Mathew (1840, 1844); James Warren Doyle (Carlow Cath., 1840); Daniel O’Connell (City Hall, Dublin, 1846, and the Crescent, Limerick, 1857); Thomas Drummond (City Hall, with motto, ‘Property has its duties as well as its rights’); Thomas Davis (Mount St Jerome, 1853), Robert Graves (Royal College of Physicians, Dublin, 1853); a ‘Drunken Faun’ (UCD); also ‘Eve’, in Rome;
 

d. 27 March, 14 Wentworth Place, Dublin; his widow and children assisted by subscription raised by William Carleton, who wrote a tribute in the Irish Quarterly Review; his Italian wife was figured on the watermark of the Irish currency, 1922-77. ODNB BREF DIB DIH

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Criticism
John Turpin, John Hogan, Irish Neo-Classical Sculptor in Rome (1982), 213pp.; port. Mulrenan; bibliographical study included in Sarah Atkinson, Essays (Dublin 1895).

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References
W. B. Stanford, Ireland and the Classical Tradition (IAP 1976; this ed. 1984); John Hogan, b. Cork, 1800; studied plaster casts of antique statuary recently presented to the Cork Arts Society; early classical work includes a drunken faun (praised by Thorwaldsen), a Roman soldier, and a Minerva (1822). Studied at Rome after 1823, visiting Vatican and Capitoline museums; became first Irish or English member of Virtuosi del Pantheon in 1837; his Drunken Faun only survives in plaster casts in Dublin and Cork; his Shepherd Boy in Iveagh House; portrait statue of Bishop James Doyle (JKL) in Carlow Cathedral combines classicism and naturalism. [122]

William Carleton: ‘I had the honour and pleasure of knowing the great poet personally - well and closely did I study his features. I have heard him sing his own songs accompanied by himself on the piano; and at the conclusion of each song there was uniformly an upturning of the eyes, which flashed and sparkled with such a radiance of inspiration as I never witnessed before nor ever expect to witness again. Whether John Hogan ever saw Thomas Moore or not I cannot say but this I can say, that the model which he conceived and executed for his monument would have given Moore to the world in the very fervour of inspiration with which he usually concluded his own song.’ Carleton later dismissed the statue by Christopher Moore which was preferred to it and erected on College Street as ‘one of the vilest jobs that ever disgraced the country, such a stupid abomination as has made the whole kingdom blush with indignation and shame.’ (See Benedict Kiely, Poor Scholar: A Study of [...] William Carleton, 1947; rep. 1972, p.150.).

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Notes
Crowning moment: Hogan placed the ‘famous Repeal cap’ on Daniel O’Connell’s head at the Mullaghmast monter meeting in Co. Clare, 1843; see Fergus O’Ferrall, ‘Daniel O’Connell, Changing Images’, Kennedy & R. Gillespie, eds., Ireland: Art into History (1994), p.99.

Portrait: There is an oil portrait of Hogan by Charles Grey; see Anne Crookshank, Irish Portraits (Ulster Museum 1965). See also port. by [?Wm.] Mulrennan, in Turpin’s biography, as supra.

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Hogan’s statue of Daniel O’Connell in the Rotunda of the City Hall, Dublin, and with it Charles Lucas, Wm. Drummond and Henry Grattan.

Sunny Jim?: Peter Costello (James Joyce: The Years of Growth 1882-1915, Kyle Cathie 1992), writes: ‘Peter McSwiney was the founder of the story that is now Clerys, and had issue including a son Paul Peter who died before him, who married a daughter of James Hogan [sic], the Cork-born sculptor [sic]. his sister [...] was married to the painter Michael Angelo Hayes.’

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