John Hely-Hutchinson (1724-1794)


Life
[John Hely; later Hely-Hutchinson; Baron Donoughmore]; TCD BA, 1744; bar, 1748; assumed additional name of Hutchinson, 1751; MP Lanesborough, 1759; MP Cork, 1761-90; MP Taghmon, 1790-94; privy counsellor and prime sargeant, 1760; Provost of Trinity, 1774; secretary of state, 1778; keeper of the privy seal; attacked for abuse of power as TCD Provost and made butt of Berwick’s Hudibrastic verse; fnd. modern language chair at Dublin University (TCD);
 
anonymously advocated Free Trade in Commercial Restraints on Ireland Considered (1779); supported legislative independence and Catholic Emancipation; believed in opening TCD to Catholics; joined opposition on regency question; friend of Burke and William Gerard Hamilton but remonstrated with Edmund Burke over his charge of making illiberal theological remarks; his wife was created baroness Donoughmore, 1785. RR ODNB DIB FDA

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Works
The Commerical Restraints of Ireland Considered: in a series of letters ... containing an historical account of the affairs of that kingdom, so far as they relate to this subject (Dublin 1779), and Do. [re. edn., as] The Commercial Restraints of Ireland (Dublin 1882); A Speech Delivered in the House of Commons of Ireland [...] on the subject of Lord S[trangford]'s Bill (Dublin 1784);

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Commentary
Maureen Wall
, Catholic Ireland in the Eighteenth Century, Collected Essays, ed. Gerard O’Brien (1989), ‘The Making of Gardiner’s Relief Act, 1781-82’ [chap.], remarks that Hely-Hutchinson [with Ogle, Bushe, and Yelverton] favoured the admission of Catholics to Trinity - and a proposal that the king assent to a statute admitting them - in preference to their continuing to be going abroad (p.142.)

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References
Seamus Deane, gen. ed., The Field Day Anthology of Irish Writing (Derry: Field Day 1991), Vol. 1, p.819, supplies extract from Edmund Burke, “Letter to a Peer in Ireland” [here 816-22], in which the following: ‘Mr Hutchinson must well know, the regard and honour I have for him in this particular, and he does not thing my dissenting from him in this particular, arises from a disregards for his opinions; it only shews, that, I think, he has lived in Ireland. To have any respect for the Charater and person of a popish prist there - Oh! it is an uphill work indeed! But until we come to respect what stands in a respectable light with others, we are very deificient in the Temper which qualifies us to make any Laws or regulations about them. It even disqualifies us from being charitable towards then with any Effect or Judgement.’ Deane [as sect. editor] remarks that Hely-Hutchinson ‘right remonstratd with Burke’ over these remarks since the provost was a staunch defender of the Irish catholics and was in favour of opening Trinity College to them on as broad a front as possible’ (Ibid., ftn.7.) Further, The Field Day Anthology of Irish Writing (Derry 1991), Vol. 2, ‘Irish gothicism’ [introductory essay by W. J. McCormack], cites Hely-Hutchinson in connection with Kockloftie, a house attacked by Ribbonmen in William Carleton’s time. Further references incl. earls [sic] of Donoughmore, 835, 837, Lady Morgan’s The O’Briens and the O’Flahertys, Chap IV, incl. a verse, ‘pat O’Daisey, / And Mistress Casey, / All blood relations to Lord Donoughmore’, which ed. describes as a variant on the verse ridiculing the Hely Hutchinson family in Richard Alfred Milliken’s ‘Groves of Blarney’ [see FDA, 1101, ‘..Tis there you’d see Peg Murphy’s daughter / A washing praties forenent the door, / With Roger Cleary, and Father Healy, / All blood relations &c], 871n; Lady Morgan, ibid. ‘we are going to play blindman’s buff at the Castle, in opposition to the Provost’s kutch-a-kutch-choo parties, who is obliged to have innocent fellows and their left-hand wives’, 872n.

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Notes
Kith & Kin (1): Richard Hely-Hutchinson, [1st Earl of Donoughmore] (1756-1825), son of the Provost; MP for Sligo, later Taghmon; supported Catholic emancipation; created Viscount Suirdale, 1797; commanded Cork Legion against United Irishmen; created an earl for his support of the Union; continued to support Emancipation but also promoted coercion; Postmaster General, 1805-08. (See Doherty & Hickey, A Chronology of Irish History Since 1500, Dublin: Gill & Macmillan 1989.)

Kith & Kin (2): John Hely-Hutchinson (1757-1832), 1st Baron Hutchinson, afterwards second Earl of Donoughmore; 2nd son. of John Hel-Hutchinson (1724-1794), ed. Eton & TCD; lieut.-col. of Athole highlanders, 1783; served Duke of York, 1793; major-gen. on staff when troops fled from Humbert at Castlebar; MP Lanesborough, 1776-83, and Cork, 1790-1800; supported Union; wounded in Alkmaar in charge of Craven's bridage, 1799; commanded first division under Abercromby in Egypt, and succeeded in command, 1801; captured Cairo, 1801, and Alexander; created Baron Hutchinson, with pension; appt. general, 1813; GCB, 1814; diplomatic missions include Prussia and Russia, 1806-07; carried George IV’s proposals to Queen Caroline at St. Omer, 1820; succeeded as Earl of Donoughmore, 1825. [ODNB.]

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Kith & Kin (3): Christopher Hely-Hutchinson (1767-1826); fifth son of former MP Taghmon, 1795; distinguished himself as volunteer (militia) at Ballinamuck, 1798; on the Helder, 1790, and in Egypt, 1801; MP Cork, 1801-12, 1819-26; MP Co. Longford, 1812-19; served in Russian army at Eyln and Friedland. [ODNB.]

Kith & Kin (4): John Hely Hutchinson (1787-1851), 3rd Earl; served in Peninsula and Waterlool; deprived of commission of aiding escape of Lavalette at Paris; suceeded his uncle, 1832. Richard Hely-Hutchinson, first earl (1756-1825); advocated Catholic Emancipation; son of Johna [supra]; created Viscount Suirdale, 1797; commanded Cork legion, 1798; supported Union, created Earl, 1800; post Master-general in Ireland, 1805-09. [ODNB.]

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Kith & Kin (5): A Capt. John Hely-Hutchinson was tried with Maj. Gen. Sir Robert Thomas Wilson and Michael Bruce, Esq., for aiding the escape of Gen. Lavalette; see report on trial (c.1816), xxiv, 105pp. [Hyland Cat. Oct. 1995].

Kith & Kin (6): Victor Hely-Hutchinson, 1901-1947, Dir. of Music at BBC in 1944, was the youngest son of Sir Walter Hely-Hutchinson, the last Governor of Cape Colony, in South Africa. (See full biographical account posted by John Hely-Hutchinson, Moolmanshof, 217 Voortrek St., Swellendam 6740, Republic of South Africa [hhmodels@intekom.co.za], at MusicWeb-International [online]

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