William Collier

Life
?1830- ; Author of History of Ireland for Schools (London 1884) and numerous works of school history; also The Blacksmith; The Queen’s Jewel; Is She a Woman?; Kate Kearney, or the Lakes of Killarney (1836); The Rival Sargeants; all farces, comedies, comic operas, or burlettas. GBI RAF

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References
Stephen Brown, Guide to Books on Ireland ([Dublin: Talbot] 1912), lists William Collier (Kate Kearney, Maid of Killarney).

Patrick Rafroidi, Irish Literature in English, The Romantic Period, 1789-1850, Vol 1 (Gerrards Cross: Colin Smyth 1980), cites also The Blacksmith; The Queen’s Jewel; Is She a Woman?; Kate Kearney, or the Lakes of Killarney (1836); The Rival Sargeants; all farces, comedies, comic operas, or burlettas.

COPAC lists The great events of history from the beginning of the Christian era to the nineteenth century (London: T. Nelson and Sons 1860; reps. 1864, 1884), vii, 348pp.; A history of English literature in a series of biographical sketches (London; Nelson 1861 1869 1895), and Do., [new rev. edn. with supplement on English literature in America] (London: NY: T. Nelson & Sons 1898, rep. 1919), vii (9)-582pp; History of Ireland for schools (Belfast, London & NY: Marcus Ward & Co. 1885), [4], 268p, 1 folding pl.; ills.; col. map; History of Greece (London, Edinburgh & NY: T. Nelson & Sons 1897); History of Rome (London, Edinburgh & NY: T. Nelson & Sons 1876, 1885, 1887); History of the British Empire (London, Edinburgh & NY: T. Nelson & Sons 1863 reps. 1868 1881 1890), 348, [4]pp.; Tales of old English life, or, Pictures of the periods (Edinburgh 1874). Also, with James Bryce & Leonard Schmitz (Viscount, 1838-1922), The international atlas and geography: modern, historical, classical, and physical (London: William Collins [1880]), 156, 38 p., 122 pp. [pls.]: ills, maps (chiefly col.), 47cm. [cites birth date as c.1830.]

Cathach Books (Cat. 12), lists Author of History of Ireland for Schools (Lon. n.d.).

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Notes
History of Ireland for Schools (1884) was included in James Joyce’s library in 1920, and itself contains the sentence conveying briefly the argument of the Book of Invasions: ‘Clan Milly from Spain [were] descendants of Millya [...] or Milesius, King of Spain, who [...] had married Scota [...] daughter of the Pharoah, King of Egypt.’ (pp.10-11; quoted in Maria Tymoczko, The Irish Ulysses, Calif. UP 1994.)

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